• Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

SobaAddict70

eG Foodblog: SobaAddict70 (2013) -- La Cuisine du Marché

162 posts in this topic

023.JPG

041.JPG

Carrot and cippolini onion confit

4 rainbow carrots, peeled and trimmed

3 gold cippolini onions, peeled and trimmed of its stem end

1/2 cup olive oil

1 large shallot, peeled and trimmed, and thinly sliced

juice of 1 lemon

1 lemon, cut into quarters

1 teaspoon fennel seeds

1/2 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes

1 teaspoon ground cumin

pinch of sea salt

1 tablespoon capers

Bring a pot of water to a boil, then add the carrots and onions. Simmer for 8-10 minutes over low heat or until carrots yield some resistance when pierced with a fork. You don't want the carrots to be tender, since they'll cook further in the olive oil bath.

Drain the vegetables, then place in a heavy-bottomed pot and add the olive oil, shallot, lemon juice, lemon, fennel seeds, crushed red pepper flakes, cumin, sea salt and capers. Simmer over low heat for 45 minutes to one hour or until the carrots are tender and easily pierced with a fork. The onions should be falling apart.

Spoon onto a serving bowl, garnish with parsley or chives, then serve at once.

Substituting cauliflower for the cippolini onion is another variation. Other add-ins are orange juice and quartered oranges, kumquats, Meyer lemons, marinated olives and green garlic.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

052.JPG

Pearl barley biryani.

I like pushing the boundaries of "what is possible" when it comes to food while still keeping one foot in tradition. The only things that differ here are the grain that was used and dried cranberries instead of raisins, otherwise it still has the same spices and ingredients that you may find in a vegetable biryani -- black mustard seeds, curry leaves, cumin, green cardamom, onions, ghee, etc.


Edited by SobaAddict70 (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The non-rice biryani is interesting and looks tasty, yes - but I will confess that I would prefer to have rice in my biryani. I might call the barley-subbed dish by another name, but that's just me.

BTW - are the plates you show (in general, not just the ones in this blog) the plates you eat...or do you do that Keith_W subterfuge of plating a teeny portion for the photo then loading it up after the photo? Just curious. Enquiring minds want to know and all that stuff. :-)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The non-rice biryani is interesting and looks tasty, yes - but I will confess that I would prefer to have rice in my biryani. I might call the barley-subbed dish by another name, but that's just me.

BTW - are the plates you show (in general, not just the ones in this blog) the plates you eat...or do you do that Keith_W subterfuge of plating a teeny portion for the photo then loading it up after the photo? Just curious. Enquiring minds want to know and all that stuff. :-)

1. "tradition" is not the same thing as "authenticity". I think we can all agree that the barley biryani is not authentic, but it follows the same techniques as a traditional biryani -- toast spices in ghee, add aromatic vegetables, etc. I can do an authentic biryani, cassoulet, carbonara, bourguignon, etc. but I'm more interested in expanding the realm of what is possible while still following certain rules. it works for me, and maybe other people. *shrug* for instance, on the blog you will find a recipe for BEET bourguignon -- pretty much Julia's recipe except it's vegan and gluten-free.

2. most of the time, what you see is how it's served. there are times when I do what Keith does, but that's not information that has to be shared. :wink:


Edited by SobaAddict70 (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So, tomorrow (Monday), I have brunch in the East Village with my mother -- you'll see pix of that.

Not sure what's for dinner tomorrow, probably leftover biryani -- but I might do a salad or a couple of apps to start.

I'll also comment more on how I devise menus. A few months ago there was a thread started by liuzhou on "Cooking For One"; this blog was a reaction to that.

Talk to y'all later.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

PERFECT omelet Soba. No unsightly brown on the outside - it could have been made in France. Rare to see.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Heh. I like to see some browning on my omelets. I don't personally care for the ultra-French type of omelets. I for one thought that Top Chef episode in the last season with Wolfgang Puck asking his gang of cheftestapants-to-be candidates to "make him an omelet" (without any other qualifications) to be both laughable and eyebrow-raising. I WISH someone had made a SE-Asian type omelet for him, or a bubbly-browned-flat omelet for him, or even something like Oh Chien (oyster omelet) for him, rather than defaulting to some approximation of a FRENCHIFIED omelet.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Heh. I like to see some browning on my omelets. I don't personally care for the ultra-French type of omelets. I for one thought that Top Chef episode in the last season with Wolfgang Puck asking his gang of cheftestapants-to-be candidates to "make him an omelet" (without any other qualifications) to be both laughable and eyebrow-raising. I WISH someone had made a SE-Asian type omelet for him, or a bubbly-browned-flat omelet for him, or even something like Oh Chien (oyster omelet) for him, rather than defaulting to some approximation of a FRENCHIFIED omelet.

I guess you can show everyone those when you do a blog.


Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

mweinstein@eGstaff.org

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

for huiray, here's a one-egg omelette from a few days ago ... I forget what the filling was, but I think it might have been cheese and something else.

you'll notice the brown spots. this omelette had 1 tablespoon cold water and no cream. personally I prefer a French omelette in the same way as how Julia demonstrated on her show, but as the saying goes, à chacun son goût.

011.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

PERFECT omelet Soba. No unsightly brown on the outside - it could have been made in France. Rare to see.

ty Patrick. that's high praise indeed. thanks again. :wink:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

so it turned out that Prune was closed -- I'll probably mosey on down there for lunch sometime this week or maybe Mission Chinese Food. and I still wanna try Torrisi Italian Specialties for dinner.

in the meantime, brunch was some Japanese izakaya on St. Mark's Place.

there is a reason why I don't do restaurant food photography, because I'm using a camera held together by tissue paper and glue from 2006.

053.JPG

miso soup

065.JPG

broiled chicken bento box -- clockwise from bottom left: broiled chicken in ponzu sauce, salad with carrot-ginger dressing, california roll, shumai, fried chicken

061.JPG

shrimp and vegetable tempura, steamed rice

lunch for two people, for $27.95, including tax and tip. very reasonable for cheap eats.


Edited by SobaAddict70 (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Indeed a one egg omelette would be quite a challenge. Would it help if you had a smaller pan?

As per huiray I grew up eating SE Asian omelettes which had lots of browning, so I was confused when people said that a true test of a chef's skill is how well he can make an omelette. Simplest thing in the world, how can it be? Well, that was what I thought until a friend made me an omelette - blonde on the outside, gooey and eggy in the center. It needs nothing else but a sprinkling of herbs and some salt. I tried it at home and my omelette resembles scrambled eggs more than an omelette - and I use three eggs! I don't think I will be posting my efforts at a 1 egg omelette any time soon.

Would you be able to show us some pics of your kitchen and your kitchen toys? That is, if you don't mind. It would be nice to see where all this lovely food is made.


There is no love more sincere than the love of food - George Bernard Shaw

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was describing to Mom dinner last night as we were walking to the train station.

The funny part is that she thinks my dinner is "gourmet". It's interesting to me, because I consider what I do to be "simple". A reminder that perception is truly in the eye of the beholder.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Indeed a one egg omelette would be quite a challenge. Would it help if you had a smaller pan?

As per huiray I grew up eating SE Asian omelettes which had lots of browning, so I was confused when people said that a true test of a chef's skill is how well he can make an omelette. Simplest thing in the world, how can it be? Well, that was what I thought until a friend made me an omelette - blonde on the outside, gooey and eggy in the center. It needs nothing else but a sprinkling of herbs and some salt. I tried it at home and my omelette resembles scrambled eggs more than an omelette - and I use three eggs! I don't think I will be posting my efforts at a 1 egg omelette any time soon.

Would you be able to show us some pics of your kitchen and your kitchen toys? That is, if you don't mind. It would be nice to see where all this lovely food is made.


I don't think the size of the pan is so much a factor as being quick and having everything ready -- a good reason why mise en place is so important. Even in my hobbit-sized kitchen, I still try to have things within easy reach so that I'm not looking for things at a critical juncture. There is literally a 15-second window before the eggs go from "perfect" to "overdone".

Here's a pic of my kitchen.

235519207_8c9fdb1c2e_o.jpg

235519208_efded892f3_o.jpg

235519210_b5d7cb497b_o.jpg

Note the extreme lack of counter space. The top of the garbage can sometimes serves as one. :wink:


Edited by SobaAddict70 (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So I might do a demo for tomorrow's lunch (not breakfast as I have a doctor's appt. at 9:45 am) on how to make a one-egg omelette. Would people be interested in that? These will be filled with asparagus and ricotta cheese.

A comment on how I devise menus:

I know what I am capable of in terms of skill set and equipment. I have not much in the way of the latter -- one frying pan/heavy skillet, one Dutch oven, one medium-sized pot, one small saucepot, one 6 quart stock pot, three Pyrex baking/roasting dishes, one cookie sheet. No microwaves, blenders or food processors. I'll probably get a mortar and pestle soon. Maybe an immersion blender for cream soups and stuff. A mandoline for turnip or potato galettes. This is an extremely low-tech kitchen.

My kitchen skills are somewhere between ambitious intermediate home cook and advanced. Yes, I know how to make the French mother sauces, how to do stocks and some other classic elements of haute cuisine. I don't know pastry or baking -- you can all laugh later this week at my effort to bake bread. :wink: but that's slowly changing. recently discovered how to make homemade pasta.

So I devise menus knowing what I can do and what I can't. sometimes something will work, sometimes not, but I document everything and show the results, failures or no. that's important. the key thing is that I tried, not whether it succeeded or failed. and if it failed, I use that knowledge for next time.

I don't think as to whether it will be all vegetarian or vegan or whatever. I usually have a mental inventory of what's in my pantry, then devise accordingly. I look for inspiration from cookbooks, restaurant menus (like the ones at Chez Panisse or Gramercy Tavern), newspaper articles, food blogs, Facebook posts, books on food, or forums like eGullet. Another key lesson is something my writing professor once mentioned -- "Keep your eyes open and be observant, because you never know when the next thing you see will be what sparks the urge to create, to write." And so it goes, as far as cooking is concerned.

And some things, like the baked eggs with asparagus salad, have personal meaning that go far beyond a mere meal. I draw from experiences in my personal life which serve as material for future use.

Dinner menu for May 27, 2013:

Insalata di funghi (this version will have roasted shiitake mushrooms)

Asparagus, with pistachios, coconut and Indian spices

"Potatoes and turnips"

Leftover pearl barley biryani

More later.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

for huiray, here's a one-egg omelette from a few days ago ... I forget what the filling was, but I think it might have been cheese and something else.

you'll notice the brown spots. this omelette had 1 tablespoon cold water and no cream. personally I prefer a French omelette in the same way as how Julia demonstrated on her show, but as the saying goes, à chacun son goût.

attachicon.gif011.JPG

Thank you.

This looks much nicer to me than the un-browned one. :-)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow, that is a pretty small kitchen! Real credit that you can turn out such lovely looking food from there!

Bit of a bodybuilder are we? Are those protein shakes on the floor? :)


There is no love more sincere than the love of food - George Bernard Shaw

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Heh. I like to see some browning on my omelets. I don't personally care for the ultra-French type of omelets. I for one thought that Top Chef episode in the last season with Wolfgang Puck asking his gang of cheftestapants-to-be candidates to "make him an omelet" (without any other qualifications) to be both laughable and eyebrow-raising. I WISH someone had made a SE-Asian type omelet for him, or a bubbly-browned-flat omelet for him, or even something like Oh Chien (oyster omelet) for him, rather than defaulting to some approximation of a FRENCHIFIED omelet.

I guess you can show everyone those when you do a blog.

Looks like you may have never seen one of those things. Possible also that you can't conceive of an omelet which does not look like the pale French type and might be upset that there could be such a thing as a browned omelet or a non-neatly-folded one which is tasty. I've provided links for "Oh Chien", did you look at them? As for a food blog myself, perhaps one day - but in a sense I already do sort-of one on a regular basis on the "Lunch" thread where I explain in detail what I do and what I use in my meals. You might want to take a look.

Keith_W has chimed in above about SE Asian omelets having lots of browning, so I am not just the only one claiming such a thing. I make them regularly too, such as for some of my fried rice dishes where I do the quick-fry omelet in a very hot pan with plenty of oil (NOT butter) to give that flat, browned (NOT burnt) omelet that one then cuts up into strips to scatter into the fried rice. Perhaps you have even eaten it without knowing it in a Chinese-origin restaurant when you had some kinds of fried rice. ;-)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

but according to Julia, not as perfect. she's one of my kitchen goddesses. :wink:

http://youtu.be/RThnq3-d6PY

Maybe it might be an idea to have other kitchen goddesses as well. :-)

ETA: One of the issues here - to me - is that folks talk in the West/USA about "an omelet" as being only one kind of thing - that pale FRENCH omelet. Even then the non-English speaking parts have frittatas, as an example, which may have browning and have a different shape than that pale, neatly folded French omelet. Yet it is still an omelet. So are all these other kinds of fried beaten-egg dishes in other parts of the world, which DO NOT follow the French model. If one said that one was making a "French omelet", rather than just simply "an omelet" then the specifications for it become narrower. (I'm not specifically referring to you, of course, I'm talking in general)

ETA2: Even Wikipedia lists all sorts of omelets/omelettes, amongst which a French omelet is just one kind and the ONLY one described as having "little to no colour" when properly done. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Omelette


Edited by huiray (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Gauntlet thrown! :laugh:

See my response to Weinoo above.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow, that is a pretty small kitchen! Real credit that you can turn out such lovely looking food from there!

Bit of a bodybuilder are we? Are those protein shakes on the floor? :)

those are bottles of protein powder.

and yes, I need to start lifting again. those are old pix, from 2008.

ty for the compliment.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

but according to Julia, not as perfect. she's one of my kitchen goddesses. :wink:

http://youtu.be/RThnq3-d6PY

Maybe it might be an idea to have other kitchen goddesses as well. :-)

I do, but with respect to specific things like omelettes, Julia is it for me.

*shrug*

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

but according to Julia, not as perfect. she's one of my kitchen goddesses. :wink:

http://youtu.be/RThnq3-d6PY

Maybe it might be an idea to have other kitchen goddesses as well. :-)

I do, but with respect to specific things like omelettes, Julia is it for me.

*shrug*

Heh.

I made an addition to my post above. :-)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.

  • Similar Content

    • By ElsieD
      We are at the airport waiting to board our flight.  As we seem to have interested folks from different parts of the world who may not know too much about our province,  I thought I would start this blog by giving you an overview of Newfoundland and Labrador (NL).
       
      Before Newfoundland  became part of Canada in 1949, it was a British Colony.  Cupids, a town on Conception Bay, was settled 406 years ago, and is the oldest continuously settled official British community in Canada.  Most of the early permanent settlers came from southwest England and southeast Ireland although  the French also settled here and in the 17th century Newfoundland was more French than English.  French is still spoken in Port au Port Penninsula, on the western side of the island, with English spoken everywhere else.   Just off the coast of south west Newfoundland, St. Pierre et Miquelon are islands that are still a colony of France.  There is a regular ferry service between Fortune, NL and St. Pierre et Miquelon.
       
      Geographically, the capital of St. John's is on the same latitude as Paris, France and Seattle, Washington.  In size, Newfoundland and Labrador is a little smaller than California, slightly bigger than Japan and twice the size of the United Kingdon.  NL covers 405,212 sq. kilometers (156,453 sq. miles) with over 29,000 kilometers (18,000 miles) of coastline.  By itself, the island of Newfoundland covers 111,390 square kilometers (43,008 sq. miles).
       
      The population of NL is 510,000, of whom 181,000 live in St. John's.  While there are some larger towns, vast areas are sparsely populated.
       
      In Newfoundland there are no snakes, skunks, racoons, poisonous insects or arachnids.  There is also no ragweed - allergy sufferers rejoice!  There are over 120,000 moose and it is home to one of the world's biggest caribou herds.   They also have some of the continent's biggest black bears.
       
      Note: This information was taken from the official Newfoundland and Labrador web site.
    • By Gunnsr42
      Hello foodies. Tell us what work of art you're cooking for your meals these days. 
    • By chefmd
      My son married a lovely young lady from Yakeshi, Inner Mongolia, China.   Mongolian: ᠶᠠᠠᠠᠰᠢ ᠬᠣᠲᠠ (Ягши хот); Chinese: 牙克石; pinyin: Yákèshí
       
      We had a wedding in the US but her family also wanted to have a traditional wedding in China.  DH and I have never being to China so this was an exciting opportunity for us!  We spent a few days in Beijing doing touristy stuff and then flew to Hailar.  There is only one flight a day on Air China that we took at 6 in the morning.  Yakeshi is about an hour drive from Hailar on a beautiful toll road with no cars on it.  I wish we took pictures of free roaming sheep and cows along the way.  The original free range meat.
       
      The family met us at the airport.  We were greeted with a shot of a traditional Chinese spirit from a traditional leather vessel.  Nothing says welcome like a stiff drink at 9 AM.  We were supposed to have a three shots (may be they were joking) but family took pity on us and limited it to one only.
       

       
    • By Panaderia Canadiense
      Wow, this is my third foodblog for the eGullet….  Welcome!   I'll be with you from Palm Sunday through Holy Sunday to give you all a taste of the veritable food festival that is Easter in Ecuador.  As usual, I intend to eat on the streets, visit a plethora of small shops and vendors, and talk about (and eat copious amounts of ) the specialty dishes of the holiday.
       
      A bit of background on me and where I am.  I'm Elizabeth; I'm 33 years old and since the last foodblog I've ceased to be a Canadian expat in Ecuador, and become a full-fledged Ecuadorian citizen.  I run a catering bakery out of Ambato, and I deliver to clients on the entire mainland.  I've got a large customer base in nearby Baños de Agua Santa, a hot-springs town about an hour downslope of me to the east; I'll be visiting it on Wednesday with close to 100 kg of baked goods for delivery.  Ambato, the capital of Tungurahua province, is located almost exactly in the geographic centre of Ecuador.  It's at an average elevation of 2,850 meters above sea level (slightly higher than Quito, the capital) - but this is measured in the downtown central park, which is significantly lower than most of the rest of the city, which extends up the sides of the river valley and onto the high plain above.  We've got what amounts to eternal late springtime weather, with two well-marked rainy seasons.  Ambato has about 300,000 people in its metro area; it's the fourth largest city in the country.  But maybe the most important thing about Ambato, especially to foodies, is that it's a transport hub for the country.  Anything travelling just about anywhere has to pass through Ambato on the way; it gives us the largest, best-stocked food market in South America.  I have simply staggering variety at my fingertips.
       

       
      This view, which was a teaser for the blog, was taken from my rooftop terrazzo.  It is a fraction of the panorama of the river valley that I see every morning, and since Easter is traditionally somewhat miserable weather-wise, the clouds stick to the hilltops.  The barrio you can see in the middle distance is Ficoa, one of the most luxury districts in the city.  Ambato is notable amongst Ecuadorian cities for having small fruit farms (300-500 m2) still operating within city limits and even within its most established barrios - it's from this that the Ambato gets one of its two sobriquets: The City of Fruits and Flowers.  The tendency for even the poorest barrios to take tremendous pride in their greenspaces gives the other: The Garden City.  My barrio, Miraflores Alto, is a working-class mixture of professors and labourers, and my neighbours keep a mixture of chickens, turkeys, and ducks in their yards; someone down the hill has a cow that I frequently hear but have never seen.  Consequently, if the season is right I can buy duck eggs from my neighbours (and if the season is wrong, entire Muscovy ducks for roasting.)
       

       
      Today, I'll be doing my largest fresh-food shopping at the Mercado Mayorista, the largest market of its kind in South America - this place covers nearly 30 square blocks, and it exists to both buy and sell produce from across the country.  Sundays and Mondays it also opens up to a huge, raucous farmer's market where smaller quantities are available for purchase.  Sunday is the day of the freshest food and the largest number of vendors.  And I'm going to cross more than half the city to get there - I've moved since the last blog, and my new house, on the slopes of the river valley is further away than the old one on the high plain.  I promise to take many pictures of this - particularly close to the High Holy days, the Mayorista is alive with vendors and there will be special sections cordoned off for sales of bacalao, truly enormous squashes, and if it follows the previous years' trends, a festival of Hornado (about which more later).  Apart from mangoes, which are just finishing up their season, it is harvest time across the country, and the Mayorista will be well stocked with all manner of fruits and vegetables.
       

       
      To start us off, I'll demystify one of my teasers a bit.
       

       
      The Minion head that peeks out of my cupboard every day belongs to my jar of ChocoListo, the Ecuadorian equivalent of chocolate Ovaltine.  Since I gave up coffee for Lent, it's my go-to morning beverage.  ChocoListo normally comes in the plain white jar with orange lid that you see in front of the Minion; that's now my hot chocolate jar because I just couldn't resist when the company came out with the specialty jars.  I firmly believe that one is never too old to have whimsical things!
       

    • By therese
      Good morning, y’all, and welcome to the party chez Therese.
      As per the teaser, this week’s foodblog does indeed come to you from Atlanta, where I live with my two children (hereafter known as Girl and Boy) and husband (hereafter known as The Man). Girl is 11, Boy is 14, and The Man is old enough to know better.
      Atlanta’s huge: the total metro population is about 4 million, and there are no physical boundaries to growth like rivers or mountain ranges, so people just keep moving (and commuting) farther and farther out of town. Atlantans can be divided into ITP (inside the perimeter) and OTP (outside the perimeter), the perimeter referring to the interstate freeway that encircles the downtown area and surrounding neighborhoods, separating it from outlying suburbs. The politically minded may note that these areas could be designated red and blue. I’ll let you figure out which is which.
      We’re about as ITP as it gets, with home, work, school, and restaurants all in walking distance. The neighborhood’s called Druid Hills, the setting for the play/movie “Driving Miss Daisy”. The houses date from the 1920s, and because Atlanta has so little in the way of “old” buildings the neighborhood’s on the National Register as a Historic District. Charming, sure, buts lots of the houses need some updating, and ours (purchased in 1996) was no exception. So we remodeled last year, including an addition with a new kitchen, and this week’s blog will look at the finished product.
      So, some encouragement for those of you presently involved in kitchen renovation, some ideas for those who are considering it.
      But never mind all that for the moment: What’s for breakfast?


      Dutch babies, that’s what. And even better, these Dutch babies are produced by my children, the aforementioned Girl and Boy. The first picture is right from the oven, the second is after the somewhat messy job of sifting powdered sugar on top. They are delicious (the Dutch babies, I mean, not the children) and a great weekend treat.

      The Man drinks coffee in the morning whereas I prefer tea. He's not up yet, having played poker last night. I'm hoping he makes it out of bed in time for dinner.

      I also eat fruit whereas he prefers, well, anything but fruit. This is not such a bad thing, as it means that I don’t have to share the fruit. Pomegranates are a pain to eat, but not so bad if you’re reading the newspaper at the same time. This one’s from California, but you can also grow them here if you’ve got enough sunshine (which I don’t).
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.