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Stand Mixers 2002 – 2011


seawakim
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Obviously, you don't use a home appliance in a commercial setting, nor do you need a professional mixer for personal useage.

See if anything here fits your needs. If nothing else, this will give you some specs to compare with other brands. If not, check out commercial dealers.

I don't have experience with the DeLonghi, (since I've always been happy with my KitchAid), but they have a good reputation.

SB :smile:

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The Hamilton Beach 700 should be a good mixer. From what I understand it is built on the old Kenwood Chef design. Which was well known in the UK but was only available in the US for a very few years and had to be converted to our different electrical system.

From what I have read, this one was designed for our system so it should work more efficiently.

I have had several KAs - Since the late 60s, always the bowl-lift models. The newer ones simply don't handle stiff doughs well. I do use the KA for egg whites, meriungues, because I have a copper liner for one of the bowls and it seems to make a significant difference. I had an ancient 10-quart Hobart but sold it last year.

I haven't tried one of the newer 6-quart models because I bought a different type of machine because I needed one that would handle stiff bread doughs (and cookie doughs) without stalling. Plus, it had a much greater capacity. It is an AEG or Electrolux Assistant and is probably too large for your needs. It does do large batches of cake batter nicely - will fill a 14-inch cake pan plus a 9-inch.

One of my friends has the Bosch Concept 7 machine, which has a smaller capacity than the Electrolux but has the direct drive and open top design which is really handy for her as she is very short, barely 5'1" and simply could not use a KA unless she placed it on a wooden chair.

She bakes constantly, cakes, cupcakes, cheesecakes, quick breads, etc., in fact, I have a pumpkin/walnut loaf, one of 14 she baked on Tuesday. Today, she is baking banana nut bread. She does a lot of baking for fund-raising bake sales for our local charities and simply has to have a reliable machine.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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She bakes constantly, cakes, cupcakes, cheesecakes, quick breads, etc., in fact, I have a pumpkin/walnut loaf, one of 14 she baked on Tuesday.  Today, she is baking banana nut bread.  She does a lot of baking for fund-raising bake sales for our local charities and simply has to have a reliable machine.

With friends like that, who even needs their own mixer? :biggrin:

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We bake different things. I bake a lot of bread, artisan loaves, multi-gran and seeded breads, also angel food and sponge cakes, and regular fruit cakes, which she doesn't - we trade. I have to be forced to make cheesecakes but she makes about 6 different varieties, including a lemon/lime "chiffon" cheesecake that is out of this world.

The closest she gets to fruit cake is a cranberry nut bread that is delicious. However she likes my fruitcakes.

Edited by andiesenji (log)

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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Of course the output measurement varies depending on the setting -- I'll be more specific by saying that I think that manufactuers should include a maximum power output for their mixers, just as they do for cars -- Im sure most people understand that horespower ratings for car engines refer to maximum outputs (car engine is not producing 350 horsepower at idle). And it doesn't really matter to me whether the mixer output is expressed in terms of horsepower or torque (they are directly related by the equation HP = Torque * RPM / 5,252), or in watts (1HP=746 watts) so long as manufacturers do it consistently.

I think that Peak HP (which, oddly is often touted by the vacuum cleaner mfgs but not by mixer mfgs) rating would be nice.

Interesting thing about those HP ratings - my husband's HVAC firm replaced an 82-year-old 5 HP electric motor (so labeled on the fine brass plate attached to the motor frame), with a brand-spankin'-new 5HP model, because it was "inefficient." The new lasted about 15 minutes before overheating and seizing. So they replaced it with a 10 HP model. That one lasted about 2 weeks. They finally had to replace it with a 20 HP model. I guess that the ratings have all gone to "peak" HP and that most of these items can't stand running even a few minutes at their peak level.

The now 91-year-old motor is still running fine, powering my husband's air compressor at home. The motor weighs in at nearly 400 pounds and takes up nearly 2 sq. feet of space, which is why it was labeled "inefficient." It didn't affect our electric bill once installed (as compared to the previous compressor motor), so I find it quite efficient, since it was free!

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I see King Arthur Flour now offers the Viking stand mixer.

Does anyone have experience with this brand?

SB (trusts KAF) :wink:

Yes, and not a lot of my experience with it is good. I have a 7 qt 1000 watt model and regret buying every time I bring it down from the shelf. It doesn't incorporate ingredients well because of the conical shape of the bowl; it is prone to stall after beating egg whites for 15 mins at speed 6 (not a huge load) which is why it is ON the shelf.

I have two KA 6 qt models that I beat the daylights out of (no pun intended) on a daily basis and they have yet to complain or stop. Twenty years ago I bought a 5 qt KA and that is still going strong as well. I agree that Kenwood/DeLonghi is a reliable brand - I didn't go with the Kenwood because it had no handle on the bowl at the time.

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We use Kenwood mixers at work (and Hobarts). We've used them for at least 15 years and I like them. I don't own a Kitchen Aid but I've used them often enough in various kitchens. I prefer Kenwood.

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I have THIS KA mixer and have had it for over a year and I love it. However, this is my second one. I was looking for a stand mixer a couple of years ago and after researching them I picked out a Kenmore Stand Mixer (can't find it on their website.) It was so loud it hurt my ears to be in the same room with it on. I also didn't feel it reached the entire bowl as well as it should. I returned it and got a KA from a kitchen wares store. I bought a display model, which was refurbished, for about $200.00. I loved it immediately, but about 3 or 4 months after I began using it it stalled one day, just locked up while making a cheesecake with two-pounds of somewhat cold cream cheese in the bowl. I had been using it alot and was making about 10 or more cakes and cheesecakes weekly with it. I called KA, they sent someone to pick it up (they paid postage) and sent me a new (refurbished) one. I've had it over a year now without any complaints. I use it for making bread, (double batches of cinnamon rolls), cakes, cheesecakes, pound cakes, cookies (several batches of batter at once) and with no problems. I found their customer service to be excellent and very prompt. I'd buy KA again in a moment.

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I've both a 5 qt and a 6 qt KA, both with the bowl lifts which I prefer. Used the 5 qt for years and liked it, though it did tend to walk a bit until I put it on one of those rubber mat things that adhere to the counter.

Got the 6 qt a couple of years ago through Amazon, refurbished, around $200 I think, and I love it. It doesn't walk and it handles everything better than the 5 qt, inlcuding very heavy biscotti doughs (double batches even) and bread doughs too.

I've never had other mixers, so I couldn't comment, but since I've never had a problem with the KA's and they work beautifully for me, I've never felt inclined to investigate anything else.

If you do go with the KA, do yourself a favor and get the 6 qt. When I used my 5 qt again after the 6, I was floored by the difference.

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OK, to get back to the initial question: for the HOME BAKER, the Kitchenaid is the choice. My wife gave me one for Christmas (!) several years ago, and there is nothing I, a home baker/bread maker, can ask which the mixer will not do, including brioche, which is probably the toughest job for the HOME BAKER (emphasis mine).

Ray

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I've had a Kitchenaid K5-A with the bowl lift since the 1970s and love it. It is made by Hobart and is a workhorse. Since you mentioned budget being a factor, I'd suggest you check ebay where I've seen them go for around $100. Replacement bowls and other accessories are still available through Kitchenaid's web site and elsewhere. I agree with other comments that it's not great with heavy bread doughs, but it's never labored or stopped working when I've used it for this. (On the other hand, my relatively new KA food processor died while mixing bialy dough based on Maggie Glezer's instructions; it was out of warranty and I had to pay KA $100 for repairs :hmmm:). To keep the mixer from walking around, put shelf liner under it; I use the nubby kind with holes. If I were purchasing a second mixer, I would definitely look at the Electrolux and Bosch for their greater capacity. But for a good all around mixer at a reasonable price, the older KAs are great.

Ilene

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I used to love my old KA and.....

I agree that the KAs made by Hobart are superior. They have metal gears and except for servicing every 8 - 10 years by anyone who works with small appliances (I can recommend one in Woodland Hills, CA) and having the electric cords replaced when they begin to crack, they work well practically forever. The one I bought at White Front discount in (I think) 1967 was used by me for 11 years then given to my step-daughter who is still using it several times a week.

I have had 3 of the newer type (5-qt) and have burnt out the motor on two, trying to mix cookie dough in one case and Struan bread dough in the other. As I said in my first post, I use it for light mixing and beating egg whites and whipped cream.

Twice I had to take the mixers back and exchange them. Fortunately I bought them at a store that will exchange "faulty" appliances and not require that you return it to the manufacturer. I ended up with a cobalt blue, which I detest, the first one (of this new bunch, was an emerald green which matched the kitchen fixtures I had at the time (Kohler). Now it doesn't match anything. (The second one was red and I liked that but they only had the blue and the white when I took the red one back.)

I understand that the newer ones with a screw-type dough hook are better for kneading soft doughs but the ones I had all suffered the "dough-climbing-up-the-dough-hook-syndrome" which annoyed me no end. having to stop the mixer and scrape the dough back into the bowl was a pain in the neck.

Hobart KA on ebay.

One ebay vendor has a KA listed as a "10-quart" model. It is not- it is a 5-quart. I had a 10-quart Hobart and none of the 10-quart bowls had a handle on the side. And they did not come with the white coated beater and dough hook. The flat beater and dough hook were silvery, bare metal. KA never marketed a 10-quart machine.

This KA looks like a good deal.

Edited by andiesenji (log)

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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OK, to get back to the initial question: for the HOME BAKER, the Kitchenaid is the choice. My wife gave me one for Christmas (!) several years ago, and there is nothing I, a home baker/bread maker, can ask which the mixer will not do, including brioche, which is probably the toughest job for the HOME BAKER (emphasis mine).

Ray

I am also a HOME baker, and my KA will NOT handle heavy bread doughs. If you want to bake bread, I would strongly recommend the Hamilton Beach/DeLonghi/Kenwood.

As an aside, I don't consider brioche to be the toughest job for the HOME BAKER. Bagel dough is quite a bit stiffer and I won't even attempt it with the KA - it's a workout even for the Kenwood/DeLonghi.

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It seems like opinions about KitchenAid mixers can inspire almost as much passion on eGullet as Rachael Ray! :shock:

Like any other piece of equipment, kitchen appliance or otherwise, knowing what you plan to use it for, doing research and getting opinions, and shopping around will pay off.

As previously, (and often), stated, I'm a happy long-time KitchenAid Owner, but I would look at the other brands too if I were in the market for a new machine today.

I can believe the newer KitchenAids, especially the cheaper models, might not have the quality of the older ones, but then again that would be reflected in the purchase price. You get what you pay for.

SB (or, at least you hope to?) :wink:

Edited by srhcb (log)
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I agree with Darcie B about the current crop of KA mixers. They do not have the staying power of the older ones built by Hobart even though they have higher wattage.

The Struan bread, popularized by Peter Reinhart, is extremely dense. The KA dough hook simply stuck in the mass and refused to move until the motor failed. The second machine broke down while mixing oatmeal cookie dough.

I finished that batch in my old (30-year-old) Hobart 10-quart. Then I exchanged the burnt out KA for the one I have now. I have never tried to use it for heavier doughs because I bought the Electrolux, which has an 8-quart bowl, is probably too big for your purposes and it is considerably more expensive.

However, you can see it here.

By the way, if you should decide on the Bosch, I highly recommend this vendor. I have purchased several applianced from them, two Excalibur dehydrators, the Electrolux mixer, a grain mill, a bread machine, a vacuum sealer and several others appliances as gifts. Their service is exceptional and their prices very competitive. If I have a question, I can phone and get knowledgeable answers.

Incidentally, the KA warranty is for one year. The Bosch warranty on the motor is 3-years, the other parts 1-year. The motor is the big factor.

Same warranty on the Electrolux, 3 years on the motor, 1 year on accessories. However I know at least a dozen people who have them and have never heard of anyone requiring motor replacement. One person had to replace the SS bowl because it could not handle being run over by a Ford Expedition in the owner's driveway.

Edited by andiesenji (log)

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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I don't have a lot to compare it to, but I like my Viking. It is extremely powerful and I use it with the meat grinder accessory on a weekly basis, as well as for dough.

It works very well for me. The paddle and whisk needed adjustment which is easy and now they extend to the bottom of the bowl. It mixes things just fine. No complaints except minor ones and I paid in the low two hundreds US$ for it. I can't imagine a dough it wouldn't work through including bagels or struan or whatever. It has never as much as slowed down or even groaned when I'ved used it!

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In light of hearing all the stories about failing and short-lived mixers, I can't help but point out that my Sunbeam mixmaster, which was a hand-me-down and I'm pretty sure is 20+ years old, has not once failed, even doing large batches of pizza dough.

"If you hear a voice within you say 'you cannot paint,' then by all means paint, and that voice will be silenced" - Vincent Van Gogh
 

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I've seen several posts mentioning Hobart Kitchen Aids, pre 1986. The Hobart N50 is the current professional model still manufactured by Hobart and is the king of stand mixers. It is the design that KitchenAids and most other stand mixers are based on. At $1800 street price, it is expensive, but I have seen used models on eBay in the $400 range. It would last a home cook for two lifetimes.

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OK, to get back to the initial question: for the HOME BAKER, the Kitchenaid is the choice. My wife gave me one for Christmas (!) several years ago, and there is nothing I, a home baker/bread maker, can ask which the mixer will not do, including brioche, which is probably the toughest job for the HOME BAKER (emphasis mine).

Ray

I am also a HOME baker, and my KA will NOT handle heavy bread doughs. If you want to bake bread, I would strongly recommend the Hamilton Beach/DeLonghi/Kenwood.

As an aside, I don't consider brioche to be the toughest job for the HOME BAKER. Bagel dough is quite a bit stiffer and I won't even attempt it with the KA - it's a workout even for the Kenwood/DeLonghi.

My Kitchenaid is about ten years old or so, and I don't know when the manufacturer/owner changed at the company. I make bread dough (all high-gluten) from very stiff to somewhat soft (mostly stiff), at least once a month, plus using the grinder attachment, and doing some regular-style cake doughs. As Julia recommended, it has done its share of 15-minute stiff brioche doughs. It sits on my spoapstone counter and stays put, as if it was bolted down. I hear the motor straining but I don't care because I used to be the appliance master-repairman for GE decades ago, and know that the sound is to be expected. I don't have a high-wattage unit. ZERO complaints! My in-laws have a newer one with the lift-bowl and they use it less, but Zero complaints from them, also. I know how they are constructed, and at their price they are much more than adequate. Perhaps the important thing is to find exactly when the company changed management, to get a clear picture of the durability.

Ray

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I used to love my old KA and.....

I agree that the KAs made by Hobart are superior. They have metal gears and except for servicing every 8 - 10 years by anyone who works with small appliances (I can recommend one in Woodland Hills, CA) and having the electric cords replaced when they begin to crack, they work well practically forever.

I have had my KA (Hobart) since 1979 and it has never been serviced or had the cord replaced. Still going strong. The only thing I have had to replace was both the whip beater and the paddle beater. Not bad for 27 years.

I also have a Magic Mill which I use basically only to knead bread when using more than 6 cups of flour. For less than 6 cups I've been using the Food Processor.

Ann

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Well, I'm pretty sure I'm going to buy a KA. Now the question is, which one?

I checked out the Cook's Illustrated reviews, and they really like the Professional 600 line. However, the slightly cheaper Artisan is "recommended, with reservations." Apparently it strains when it kneads bread dough.

Now, I must point out that I have never made a loaf of bread in my life, despite my good intentions to do so. I don't know if I'll like kneading by hand, or hate the entire process. Am I silly to "overbuy" and get the bigger and supposedly better Pro 600, or should I get the Artisan for the cookies and cakes that I bake now, and maybe upgrade later?

Anyone out there have the Artians, and like to comment?

:biggrin:

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