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Stand Mixers 2002 – 2011


seawakim
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I have the Professional 6 and it's often too big to do small batches. I like the lifting action, but I would have preferred a smaller bowl since I'm mostly using it for relatively small batches of food.

One thing I would recommend is that you purchase an extra bowl whatever kind you get. It's really nice being able to swap out.

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I think the metal flat paddle is better than the coated (although I haven't tried it) -- I find that the coated on the top of the paddle rubs away -- I've gone through 3 in 8 years, and am getting ready to buy a fourth.

"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

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The lifting bowl will keep the attachments in registration with the bowl forever and the 5 qt capacity is very useful. I have a 5 qt in the 'Machine Shop' finish with grinder and other attachments and the thing is so 'bullet proof' and will handle 7 cups of flour. I don't think that there is a 'bad' Kitchenaid mixer though. -Dick

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I'm a pastry person and highly recommend the 6 qt. I have a standard tilt head 4 1/2 qt also that has worked wonderfully, but couldn't handle my wedding cake volume. The screw bottow bowl also began to strip, and I am not a fan of the coated beaters: they can chip and leave crap in your batter/dough. Also the tilt head can get very dirty and hard to clean. If you're concerned about small amounts of whites/batters to mix, just do it by hand. And unless you're kneading enough bread dough for 6-8 loaves, you should really knead it yourself anyway. That's the only way to really learn how to make bread. (sorry, pet peeve...people cooked and baked without these things forever, there's no reason to use a mixer for a two loaf batch of bread.)

"Godspeed all the bakers at dawn... may they all cut their thumbs and bleed into their buns til they melt away..."

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Does anybody have any experience with the Hamilton Beach (these are really Euro mixers sold under the Kenwood name over there, I think) mixers? These have a tilt-up head (the whole body, really) and twice the power of the KitchenAid models.

cpm500_sm.jpg

Click pic for manufacturer's info page

Don Moore

Nashville, TN

Peace on Earth

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I tried the Hamilton Beach (now under the name DeLonghi) before getting the 6 qt. KA, and I sent it back. It's cheapy plastic surface and speed dial were warning signs, then the thing went kaput after a batch of italian meringue, it couldn't take high speed for any length of time before the motor overheated. (As an aside, it was purchased through chef's catalogue, and they were wonderful with returns). Kitchen Aid monopolizes the market for a reason...

"Godspeed all the bakers at dawn... may they all cut their thumbs and bleed into their buns til they melt away..."

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Just an fyi--I've merged and cleaned up this thread. I hope it reads more coherently.

And a bonus fyi--for anyone lucky enough to live near a Williams-Sonoma outlet, like I do in Leesburg, VA: they have refurbished Kitchenaid K5A/K5SS selling for $129 at the moment. As I've mentioned on the other K-aid threads, I think these 5 quart bowl models offered the best price to performance to build quality ratio going. If we didn't already have several K-aids I'd have grabbed up another one.

Steve Klc

Pastry chef-Restaurant Consultant

Oyamel : Zaytinya : Cafe Atlantico : Jaleo

chef@pastryarts.com

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  • 2 months later...

Hi there,

I'm looking for a small {6 liter capacity} mixer for use in a semi professional capacity.

I've looked at several sorts but I only end up getting more confused. Should I go for a kenwood, kitchen aid or alpha mixer ???

I'd love a really strong motor and full steel body. Whats your advice and if you have a particular model or preferance then perhaps you can post a link to an active site or web page. :biggrin:

THANXS :rolleyes:

Edited by Star-Anise (log)
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Welcome to eGullet, Star-Anise.

We've discussed stand mixers a bit. Here is a recent thread that includes some information, plus links to other threads.

KitchenAid mixer recommendation

Physical appearance and mechanical robustness aside, what will you be doing with it?

Dave Scantland
Executive director
dscantland@eGstaff.org
eG Ethics signatory

Eat more chicken skin.

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Well dave the cook,

My wife and I are looking at producing some small time cakes,doughs and breads for a local market, were not after a heavy duty mixer right now {ie hobart} as were only going to be using it once every 2 weeks and also because we don't want to get to far involved until it starts to

1/ turn a profit

2/ Prove to be viable long term

3/ Warrent the outlay of cash{which is based on profit}

So, were quite simply looking for something that will get us started and then perhaps slip down into being our number 2 mixer when we "upgrade". Durability and dependability are 2 things that we need.

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I have to get several mixers too, and have been doing a lot of research. Go for the most powerful for the price. You may be starting small now, but as business grows you will want a more heavy-duty machine. The Kenwood and the new Viking

have 800-1000 watts of power for 7qt. mixer.

Melissa McKinney

Chef/Owner Criollo Bakery

mel@criollobakery.com

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I need to ask a question here since I don't have one of these, but would like one. What is the difference between tilt lift and bowl lift and why would I want one over the other?

:blink:

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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I have to get several mixers too, and have been doing a lot of research. Go for the most powerful for the price. You may be starting small now, but as business grows you will want a more heavy-duty machine. The Kenwood and the new Viking

have 800-1000 watts of power for 7qt. mixer.

Yeh, I've looked at the kenwood.

How does it's construction compaire to the "pro" kitchen aids? :huh:

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Reconditioned Hobart's start at about $400. We use one at work to mix up fast setting roadway patch. We have 2 mounted on the back of a pickup truck. I'd go that route for anything being done commercial.

Bruce Frigard

Quality control Taster, Château D'Eau Winery

"Free time is the engine of ingenuity, creativity and innovation"

111,111,111 x 111,111,111 = 12,345,678,987,654,321

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Reconditioned Hobart's start at about $400. We use one at work to mix up fast setting roadway patch. We have 2 mounted on the back of a pickup truck. I'd go that route for anything being done commercial.

I've thought about that option BUT, werte going to have to move the mixer initally,

Were lucky enough to be able to use a friends kitchen{ fully approved for food preperation} BUT were going to have to move all our stuff out after we have finished.

The idea of moving a hobart really doesn't appeal, plus if things don't work out in the begining we'll be able to re-use the smaller mixer at home. :biggrin:

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Reconditioned Hobart's start at about $400. We use one at work to mix up fast setting roadway patch. We have 2 mounted on the back of a pickup truck. I'd go that route for anything being done commercial.

Where might I go about looking for a reconditioned Hobart stand mixer? i.e. a small one, not one of the 15-gallon sizes. :biggrin:

Don Moore

Nashville, TN

Peace on Earth

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I think a six quart kitchen aid is the way to go, yes you spend 300 bucks, but it's a work horse you'll always need it, even if your volume increases and you get a big hobart eventually, you'll still want something to do small batches it.

I had some experience with a DeLonghi model: STAY AWAY!

I attempted an italian meringue buttercream and it overheated and cut off before my whites were cool. This actually happened twice, I traded it in for the KA and have been very satisfied since.

"Godspeed all the bakers at dawn... may they all cut their thumbs and bleed into their buns til they melt away..."

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Reconditioned Hobart's start at about $400. We use one at work to mix up fast setting roadway patch. We have 2 mounted on the back of a pickup truck. I'd go that route for anything being done commercial.

I've thought about that option BUT, werte going to have to move the mixer initally,

Were lucky enough to be able to use a friends kitchen{ fully approved for food preperation} BUT were going to have to move all our stuff out after we have finished.

The idea of moving a hobart really doesn't appeal, plus if things don't work out in the begining we'll be able to re-use the smaller mixer at home. :biggrin:

It's quite portable about 2-3 times the size of a kitchenaid. 2 average people could carry it.

Bruce Frigard

Quality control Taster, Château D'Eau Winery

"Free time is the engine of ingenuity, creativity and innovation"

111,111,111 x 111,111,111 = 12,345,678,987,654,321

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I need to ask a question here since I don't have one of these, but would like one. What is the difference between tilt lift and bowl lift and why would I want one over the other?

:blink:

Ok, I really do need an answer to this question, as I'm going in search of a stand mixer tomorrow. Today, I was using my hand mixer, and this horrible watery chocolately mess leaked out of it. I shouldn't use my hand mixer for cakes. So.....which is best and why? :smile:

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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The advantage of a tilt lift mixer is that the machine is smaller and you don't have to remove the paddle/whisk etc. when removing the bowl like you do with the bowl lift.

The disadvantage of the tilt mixer is that there are reports that the tilt bowls can either get the threads stripped or can get screwed into the base so tight during mixing that is it difficult to remove. Also, if you can fit the lift mixer into a space then it will work, while the tilt mixers need room to tilt as well, so low cabinets might pose a problem.

Overall, I would say that if you can find a bowl lift for a price you can afford than I would get the bowl lift.

Edited by Scotty O (log)
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There are KA-sized Hobart stand mixers out there, as well...we have several in my school. I don't know whether they're currently in production, but they are still well-supported at any rate.

I bought my 300-watt Kitchenaid refurbished from the service centre for about 40% less than the regular retail. I've only had it for a year, but so far so good. And the tendonitis in my whisking elbow has subsided considerably!

“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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