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HELP! re prime rib in the oven


PassionateAmateur
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My coworker is planning to cook at 10 lb prime rib tomorrow night for a dinner party. She found a recipe that said to roast at 200 degrees for 3-4 hours until it comes up to 120 degrees, then sear on stove top to finish. Sounds fine, except the recipe goes on to say that it doesn't matter how big the roast is, it will still take 3-4 hours. Sounds crazy to me. Can anyone weigh in on this before she goes home at 5pm Ny time?

Thanks!

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The roast only gets longer not much wider. Think of it like a 1 inch thick steak. Lets say it weighs 1 lb and takes 14 minutes to broil. Now add another 1 inch 1 lb steak in the pan and tell me how long to cook those steaks that are now 2 lb total weight.

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I'm too late to help PassionateAmateur's co-worker, and hopefully his/her prime rib turned out great, but for anyone else reading this thread, I have two links for you.

The first is Paula Deen's "foolproof" prime rib recipe:

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/paula-deen/foolproof-standing-rib-roast-recipe/index.html

We haven't used her rub, but the method, whereby you cook the roast for x amount of minutes, let it stand for 3 hours, then finish it off (a time consuming method, admittedly, but it turns out GREAT). Its our family go-to method for standing rib roast / prime rib.

Now, this second link, I haven't tried it yet, but I'm intrigued:

http://www.seriouseats.com/2009/12/the-food-lab-how-to-cook-roast-a-perfect-prime-rib.html

They have a different method, that I'm interested to try. Basically, you cook the roast low and slow for a certain amount of time. Then you let the roast rest while you crank up the oven really high. Pop the roast in the very hot oven for a short amount of time to let it brown the outside. Very interesting. If anyone has tried this already, would love to hear how it turned out.

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The last time I did a prime rib in the oven, we gave it a hard sear on the stovetop and then into a 200 F oven for about 5 hours and it turned out just fine. I cannot recall if we cranked up the oven or turned on the broiler for a harder crust, but I doubt it. We did remove the fat and made popovers with it.

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the Test Kitchen has done this in a similar way. Cant recal the Ep. but they chilled the steak/roast first in the freezer to chill the outer

layers, then did the very hot broiler a bit for the browning then the very slow oven. havent done this in a while but it did look perfect!

Edited by rotuts (log)
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the Test Kitchen has done this in a similar way. Cant recal the Ep. but they chilled the steak/roast first in the freezer to chill the outer

layers, then did the very hot broiler a bit for the browning then the very slow oven. havent done this in a while but it did look perfect!

This episode just played on my local PBS station this past weekend.

First, they cut the bones off. Then they browned it on all sides in a skillet. They said the skillet browning is easier done without the bones attached. Then they let the roast cool a little and then twine-tied the bones back on and roasted it in the 200°F oven for a couple of hours.

You can watch the video segment from the show on America's Test Kitchen web site here: Prime Rib

 

“Peter: Oh my god, Brian, there's a message in my Alphabits. It says, 'Oooooo.'

Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”

– From Fox TV’s “Family Guy”

 

Tim Oliver

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I havent seen the episode, but did they have the rib roast at room temp before freezing the outside, or was the rib roast previously frozen?

I might have to try this with a blow torch then finish it off in my PID controlled rottiserie oven.

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Now, this second link, I haven't tried it yet, but I'm intrigued:

http://www.seriouseats.com/2009/12/the-food-lab-how-to-cook-roast-a-perfect-prime-rib.html

They have a different method, that I'm interested to try. Basically, you cook the roast low and slow for a certain amount of time. Then you let the roast rest while you crank up the oven really high. Pop the roast in the very hot oven for a short amount of time to let it brown the outside. Very interesting. If anyone has tried this already, would love to hear how it turned out.

The most important part, to me, is:

"Sub-Commandment i: The Perfect Prime Rib must be cookable without the use of heavy or specialized equipment, including propane or oxy-acetylene torches, sous-vide machines, or C-vap ovens."

:-)

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Now, this second link, I haven't tried it yet, but I'm intrigued:

http://www.seriouseats.com/2009/12/the-food-lab-how-to-cook-roast-a-perfect-prime-rib.html

They have a different method, that I'm interested to try. Basically, you cook the roast low and slow for a certain amount of time. Then you let the roast rest while you crank up the oven really high. Pop the roast in the very hot oven for a short amount of time to let it brown the outside. Very interesting. If anyone has tried this already, would love to hear how it turned out.

The most important part, to me, is:

"Sub-Commandment i: The Perfect Prime Rib must be cookable without the use of heavy or specialized equipment, including propane or oxy-acetylene torches, sous-vide machines, or C-vap ovens."

:-)

I'm not quite sure if you meant to link to my post, or the one below mine, because as far as I read, there was no heavy or specialized equipment, sous vide, torches or C vap ovens (although I'm not quite sure exaclty what the latter is).

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They have a different method, that I'm interested to try. Basically, you cook the roast low and slow for a certain amount of time. Then you let the roast rest while you crank up the oven really high. Pop the roast in the very hot oven for a short amount of time to let it brown the outside. Very interesting. If anyone has tried this already, would love to hear how it turned out.

I have tried this. It might just be my oven, but it never browns to my satisfaction before the inside gets too hot (an overcooked inside is a travesty). What I did last year was smoke to temp at about 225 and then put the roast directly over hardwood charcoal "propped up" to about 1/2 inch or so below the grate (I use the Weber baskets designed for indirect to prop up the coals). It will start a fire instantly, so you got to have the lid ready and your sh*t together, but man was it good! Stay away from anything that will burn. All that fat smoke rivaled the wood smoke for flavor.
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Now, this second link, I haven't tried it yet, but I'm intrigued:

http://www.seriouseats.com/2009/12/the-food-lab-how-to-cook-roast-a-perfect-prime-rib.html

They have a different method, that I'm interested to try. Basically, you cook the roast low and slow for a certain amount of time. Then you let the roast rest while you crank up the oven really high. Pop the roast in the very hot oven for a short amount of time to let it brown the outside. Very interesting. If anyone has tried this already, would love to hear how it turned out.

The most important part, to me, is:

"Sub-Commandment i: The Perfect Prime Rib must be cookable without the use of heavy or specialized equipment, including propane or oxy-acetylene torches, sous-vide machines, or C-vap ovens."

:-)

I'm not quite sure if you meant to link to my post, or the one below mine, because as far as I read, there was no heavy or specialized equipment, sous vide, torches or C vap ovens (although I'm not quite sure exaclty what the latter is).

The "sub-commandment" I quoted was in the link you referenced: i.e., http://www.seriouseats.com/2009/12/the-food-lab-how-to-cook-roast-a-perfect-prime-rib.html I did indeed approve of the "requirement" that there be "no heavy or specialized equipment, sous vide, torches or C vap ovens".

Did you read the whole thing through in the link you quoted?

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Now, this second link, I haven't tried it yet, but I'm intrigued:

http://www.seriouseats.com/2009/12/the-food-lab-how-to-cook-roast-a-perfect-prime-rib.html

They have a different method, that I'm interested to try. Basically, you cook the roast low and slow for a certain amount of time. Then you let the roast rest while you crank up the oven really high. Pop the roast in the very hot oven for a short amount of time to let it brown the outside. Very interesting. If anyone has tried this already, would love to hear how it turned out.

The most important part, to me, is:

"Sub-Commandment i: The Perfect Prime Rib must be cookable without the use of heavy or specialized equipment, including propane or oxy-acetylene torches, sous-vide machines, or C-vap ovens."

:-)

I'm not quite sure if you meant to link to my post, or the one below mine, because as far as I read, there was no heavy or specialized equipment, sous vide, torches or C vap ovens (although I'm not quite sure exaclty what the latter is).

The "sub-commandment" I quoted was in the link you referenced: i.e., http://www.seriouseats.com/2009/12/the-food-lab-how-to-cook-roast-a-perfect-prime-rib.html I did indeed approve of the "requirement" that there be "no heavy or specialized equipment, sous vide, torches or C vap ovens".

Did you read the whole thing through in the link you quoted?

Apologies, I misunderstood your post. Yes, I did read the whole thing, albeit not recently.

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They have a different method, that I'm interested to try. Basically, you cook the roast low and slow for a certain amount of time. Then you let the roast rest while you crank up the oven really high. Pop the roast in the very hot oven for a short amount of time to let it brown the outside. Very interesting. If anyone has tried this already, would love to hear how it turned out.

I have tried this. It might just be my oven, but it never browns to my satisfaction before the inside gets too hot (an overcooked inside is a travesty). What I did last year was smoke to temp at about 225 and then put the roast directly over hardwood charcoal "propped up" to about 1/2 inch or so below the grate (I use the Weber baskets designed for indirect to prop up the coals). It will start a fire instantly, so you got to have the lid ready and your sh*t together, but man was it good! Stay away from anything that will burn. All that fat smoke rivaled the wood smoke for flavor.

Interesting. I don't know if I would be brave enough to use the BBQ at the end, given your description re fire, but presumably, one could pan sear the outside of the meat at the end, instead of using the oven on high heat or the barbecue. :biggrin:

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They have a different method, that I'm interested to try. Basically, you cook the roast low and slow for a certain amount of time. Then you let the roast rest while you crank up the oven really high. Pop the roast in the very hot oven for a short amount of time to let it brown the outside. Very interesting. If anyone has tried this already, would love to hear how it turned out.

I have tried this. It might just be my oven, but it never browns to my satisfaction before the inside gets too hot (an overcooked inside is a travesty). What I did last year was smoke to temp at about 225 and then put the roast directly over hardwood charcoal "propped up" to about 1/2 inch or so below the grate (I use the Weber baskets designed for indirect to prop up the coals). It will start a fire instantly, so you got to have the lid ready and your sh*t together, but man was it good! Stay away from anything that will burn. All that fat smoke rivaled the wood smoke for flavor.

Interesting. I don't know if I would be brave enough to use the BBQ at the end, given your description re fire, but presumably, one could pan sear the outside of the meat at the end, instead of using the oven on high heat or the barbecue. :biggrin:

You can get better results using a blow torch rather then pan searing at the end. I dont have a link but ad hoc at home used a blow torch at the end to get that nice crust without over cooking the outer edges of the prime rib.

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They have a different method, that I'm interested to try. Basically, you cook the roast low and slow for a certain amount of time. Then you let the roast rest while you crank up the oven really high. Pop the roast in the very hot oven for a short amount of time to let it brown the outside. Very interesting. If anyone has tried this already, would love to hear how it turned out.

I have tried this. It might just be my oven, but it never browns to my satisfaction before the inside gets too hot (an overcooked inside is a travesty). What I did last year was smoke to temp at about 225 and then put the roast directly over hardwood charcoal "propped up" to about 1/2 inch or so below the grate (I use the Weber baskets designed for indirect to prop up the coals). It will start a fire instantly, so you got to have the lid ready and your sh*t together, but man was it good! Stay away from anything that will burn. All that fat smoke rivaled the wood smoke for flavor.

Interesting. I don't know if I would be brave enough to use the BBQ at the end, given your description re fire, but presumably, one could pan sear the outside of the meat at the end, instead of using the oven on high heat or the barbecue. :biggrin:

You can get better results using a blow torch rather then pan searing at the end. I dont have a link but ad hoc at home used a blow torch at the end to get that nice crust without over cooking the outer edges of the prime rib.

I don't know that I'm brave enough to use a blow torch, either, especially not with furballs in the house.

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Interesting. I don't know if I would be brave enough to use the BBQ at the end, given your description re fire, but presumably, one could pan sear the outside of the meat at the end, instead of using the oven on high heat or the barbecue. :biggrin:

It's not as bad as it sounds, as long as you are ready. I like high-heat grilling. I do not like char, but I do like meats well-browned. I can't get that fast enough in my oven. To avoid a fire, you could put a cast iron skillet over the coals. I did that one time to make smashburgers (awesome) and the temp was around 800 degrees. You might be able to get it hotter burning some wood. I'm not sure how hot my stove burner gets, but it doesn't matter because at that temp the smoke would set off every smoke detector in the house and would splatter fat everywhere. Better to do that outside in the yard.

For a large roast, I'd think a blowtorch would take too long. Plus, I don't get good results with one. Plus plus, you can get flames with torches too.

ETA: and what would your fur balls be doing that close to the meat?

Edited by Ttogull (log)
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Interesting. I don't know if I would be brave enough to use the BBQ at the end, given your description re fire, but presumably, one could pan sear the outside of the meat at the end, instead of using the oven on high heat or the barbecue. :biggrin:

It's not as bad as it sounds, as long as you are ready. I like high-heat grilling. I do not like char, but I do like meats well-browned. I can't get that fast enough in my oven. To avoid a fire, you could put a cast iron skillet over the coals. I did that one time to make smashburgers (awesome) and the temp was around 800 degrees. You might be able to get it hotter burning some wood. I'm not sure how hot my stove burner gets, but it doesn't matter because at that temp the smoke would set off every smoke detector in the house and would splatter fat everywhere. Better to do that outside in the yard.

For a large roast, I'd think a blowtorch would take too long. Plus, I don't get good results with one. Plus plus, you can get flames with torches too.

ETA: and what would your fur balls be doing that close to the meat?

I meant more along the lines of we have furballs that come into the kitchen. The dog (a chocolate lab) is easy enough to spot, or hear, and knows at least when I'm the only one in the kitchen, she is not allowed in it. She has to wait outside the door, and isn't allowed in. The cats are more problematic - they usually come in very quietly, and sometimes startle me by rubbing up against my legs (I'm the can opener, as well as the cook, so I'm very popular). One time, and thankfully only one time, the big male cat decided to jump up on top of the stove to try to help himself to the hamburger in the skillet. He's never done it before, and fortunately I had turned the heat off and he wasn't hurt, but he's not very bright, and I worry he could decide to try it again. He also has a tendency to get excited about the smell of meat cooking, and has a bad habit of running right in front of my legs, back and forth, sometimes tripping me. (Like I said, not bright.)

I could shut the doors to the kitchen, but no matter how many times you tell people around here, they don't remember to keep them shut, so I can't depend on that, either. And then of course, with the smell of meat cooking in the house, there's always the possibility that the two cats, who HATE each other, and who don't particularly like the dog, might congregate immediately outside the kitchen, like circling sharks who smell the chum, and startle me by getting in a loud fight or knocking something over. All not good when dealing with a torch. :(

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actually expert Torching is an Art. there is a fine line between 'Brown' and 'Char'

It helps to brush on melted butter as you torch. I use a shaker with a prime rib rub mixed with powdered sugar to get a carmelized glazed crust. I use the same method when i make honey glazed hams for the holidays. Although the ham gets a more spiced rub with more powdered brown sugar and I brush honey instead of melted butter.

Edited by FeChef (log)
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interesting idea. what's your prime rib rub? Ive become addicted to Sauer's Roast Prime Rib Rub.

browning meat proteins alone might taste a little different than caramelizing sugar. but Good is Good.

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interesting idea. what's your prime rib rub? Ive become addicted to Sauer's Roast Prime Rib Rub.

browning meat proteins alone might taste a little different than caramelizing sugar. but Good is Good.

Its my own mix of various spices and blends. Lately ive been trying different mixes on chuck roasts sous vide for 24 hours @ 135F. Right now my favorite spice blend is McCormick's Culinary "char broil and grill seasoning. It has lower sodium % versus other spice blends. Its very fine powder that doesnt seem to have any spices that burn or give an off taste when over direct flame. Some spice blends have coarse spices that burn very easily over direct flame.

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Not brave enough to use the bbq or the torch. :huh: maybe you should stick to using the microwave, just dont let the cats near it, the dog probably wont fit so no worries there. :raz:

I've used the BBQ and the smoker plenty of times in the past, but when people start talking about fires and 800 degree temperatures, I get a little antsy. Which is far better than snide.

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Not brave enough to use the bbq or the torch. :huh: maybe you should stick to using the microwave, just dont let the cats near it, the dog probably wont fit so no worries there. :raz:

I've used the BBQ and the smoker plenty of times in the past, but when people start talking about fires and 800 degree temperatures, I get a little antsy. Which is far better than snide.

Lighten up a bit. Your on a cooking forum, and those are cooking utilities that you gave the impression you are afraid of. Im sorry you didnt find the humor in it. My appoligies if you found my comment snide.

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