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Yard Sale, Thrift Store, Junk Heap Shopping (Part 2)


Darienne
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Indulged my love of small dishes yesterday and fell in love with the lacquer tray. The little bowls were $.99 each, the square plate was a 1.99 and the tray was $2.99. No tax and a 10% discount because I'm a senior.

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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This weekend I visited an estate sale nearby.  The day was the fine, sunny spring day we enjoy up here with leaves rustling and apples blossoming, and the cheery weather carried over to the gang waiting in line.  The house is a beautifully kept log home with golden varnished wood inside and out. The basement area was clean and open, and had probably been the woman's canning area, judging by the sinks and roasters and jars packed among small appliances, books and tables' worth of old kitchen tools.  I spotted my favorite style of lemon squeezer - only $5 on the first day! 

 

Citrus juicer 500.jpg

 

I thought about taking it.  I resisted: I have two already (this photo is of one of mine) and have given others to all my friends who would appreciate one.  I didn't need another.  Maybe it would find a good home with someone who needed it.  

 

Up the tight wooden spiral staircase I went to the main living area. The kitchen had cabinets with tin panels in the golden wood frames, an old-fashioned compressor-on-top refrigerator (running) and a heavy enameled cast iron multi-chamber stove designed for propane.  The dining room had a generous table; the living room looked comfortable with a stone fireplace going up through the middle of the house as is proper.  The place had a wide variety of dishes, glassware, table linens, musical instruments, games, crocks (the original point of my visit), artwork, furniture - all displayed in a comfortable array.    As I wandered I got the strong sense that this woman had loved to cook and to entertain, and she'd loved her family and friends.  The place had the feel of a life very well lived.  I mentioned it to another woman who was perusing at more or less the same pace as I (we'd been discussing crocks earlier) and she agreed.  Then a young woman who was looking through the cookbooks turned to me.  "I didn't mean to eavesdrop," she said, "but it's so nice to hear you say that!  This house was my grandmother's, and you've described her exactly."  We chatted for a bit about the warm feeling of the home, and I learned that the granddaughter was looking for books with her grandmother's handwritten notes.

 

Back down the stairs I went, to check out a pressure cooker I'd seen before.   "We're interested in the same things," said the first woman I'd been talking to. She didn't want the pressure cooker, so I claimed it.  Then I had an idea. "Do you like to cook from scratch? Do you use lemons and limes in your cooking?" I asked.  She did.  I pointed to the lemon squeezer.  "Do you know what that is?"  She didn't.  I told her.  She was impressed.  That squeezer has a new home now, and I hope it will be well-loved and -used.

 

I came away with a 2-gallon Redwing crock in excellent condition (at a good price, relatively speaking) and these:

 

Estate sale treasures box open.jpg

 

The deep fryer ($16) was new in the box, never opened, and will be tested sometime this week.  The pressure cooker was in excellent condition, all parts intact, $5.  I used it last night.  I am a sucker for vintage fabrics.  These didn't cost much, and when I use them I'll think of this woman I never met who gave such a warm spirit to her home.

 

Estate sale treasures books.jpg

 

The two upper right books are locally-produced books from the Lutheran Church ladies.  Experience suggests that I'll never cook from them, but they're local history and I half expect to find names I recognize.  The "General Foods Cooking School of the Air" book seems to be a companion piece to a radio cooking show from long ago, hosted by one Frances Lee Barton.  The other two books speak for themselves.  The Sunset book has already been put to good use.

 

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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

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"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)
"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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Nice haul.  I love your description of the place.  I have both bread books and have used them for many years.

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"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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So Kerry Beal and I found some time yesterday to do some thrift shop shopping. Here is my haul:

image.jpg

Who could resist the compartmentalized bamboo tray? And the cute little bowl and the covered glass bowls which stack very neatly or nest together without their lids. And Simon Hopkinson's Roast Chicken and Other Stories for $2.99?

image.jpg

This we did not buy. But a long time ago we had promised rotuts to take photographs of any of these expensive machines that we saw in thrift stores.

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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  • 2 weeks later...

image.jpg

image.jpg

Today's haul. A small stainless steel pie plate and an enameled cast iron Dutch oven. Wanted a second Dutch oven so I can bake two loaves of no-knead bread at the same time but never expected to find one for $20 in such good condition. Kerry Beal objected to the colour but I don't care if it's sky blue pink with yellow dots so long as it does the job. And the small pie plate will do much more than pies in this solo household.

  • Like 6

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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This weekend I visited an estate sale nearby.  The day was the fine, sunny spring day we enjoy up here with leaves rustling and apples blossoming, and the cheery weather carried over to the gang waiting in line.  The house is a beautifully kept log home with golden varnished wood inside and out. The basement area was clean and open, and had probably been the woman's canning area, judging by the sinks and roasters and jars packed among small appliances, books and tables' worth of old kitchen tools.  I spotted my favorite style of lemon squeezer - only $5 on the first day! 

 

attachicon.gifCitrus juicer 500.jpg

 

I thought about taking it.  I resisted: I have two already (this photo is of one of mine) and have given others to all my friends who would appreciate one.  I didn't need another.  Maybe it would find a good home with someone who needed it.  

 

Up the tight wooden spiral staircase I went to the main living area. The kitchen had cabinets with tin panels in the golden wood frames, an old-fashioned compressor-on-top refrigerator (running) and a heavy enameled cast iron multi-chamber stove designed for propane.  The dining room had a generous table; the living room looked comfortable with a stone fireplace going up through the middle of the house as is proper.  The place had a wide variety of dishes, glassware, table linens, musical instruments, games, crocks (the original point of my visit), artwork, furniture - all displayed in a comfortable array.    As I wandered I got the strong sense that this woman had loved to cook and to entertain, and she'd loved her family and friends.  The place had the feel of a life very well lived.  I mentioned it to another woman who was perusing at more or less the same pace as I (we'd been discussing crocks earlier) and she agreed.  Then a young woman who was looking through the cookbooks turned to me.  "I didn't mean to eavesdrop," she said, "but it's so nice to hear you say that!  This house was my grandmother's, and you've described her exactly."  We chatted for a bit about the warm feeling of the home, and I learned that the granddaughter was looking for books with her grandmother's handwritten notes.

 

Back down the stairs I went, to check out a pressure cooker I'd seen before.   "We're interested in the same things," said the first woman I'd been talking to. She didn't want the pressure cooker, so I claimed it.  Then I had an idea. "Do you like to cook from scratch? Do you use lemons and limes in your cooking?" I asked.  She did.  I pointed to the lemon squeezer.  "Do you know what that is?"  She didn't.  I told her.  She was impressed.  That squeezer has a new home now, and I hope it will be well-loved and -used.

 

I came away with a 2-gallon Redwing crock in excellent condition (at a good price, relatively speaking) and these:

 

attachicon.gifEstate sale treasures box open.jpg

 

The deep fryer ($16) was new in the box, never opened, and will be tested sometime this week.  The pressure cooker was in excellent condition, all parts intact, $5.  I used it last night.  I am a sucker for vintage fabrics.  These didn't cost much, and when I use them I'll think of this woman I never met who gave such a warm spirit to her home.

 

attachicon.gifEstate sale treasures books.jpg

 

The two upper right books are locally-produced books from the Lutheran Church ladies.  Experience suggests that I'll never cook from them, but they're local history and I half expect to find names I recognize.  The "General Foods Cooking School of the Air" book seems to be a companion piece to a radio cooking show from long ago, hosted by one Frances Lee Barton.  The other two books speak for themselves.  The Sunset book has already been put to good use.

 

A wonderful description and the house sounds like just the kind of place you want to be.  The tablecloth with the pears and cherries?  I have one, too, also found out thrifting somewhere long ago!

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This is a large heavy pot that I bought at a flea market. A neodymium magnet sticks to it but not very well. The inside of the pot and lid are tinned. I don't think the lid is original but it has a similar verdigris. The handles are not riveted on and have a unique decoration. At the base of the handle is a mark. Does anyone know anything about it? (banana for scale)

 

pot.jpg

Chances are, it IS a riveted handle.  If you removed the verdegris and polished, you would likely see where the rivets were inset and then ground flush with the flange.  An old British mark, Elkington, was famous for this attachment using bell metal handles.  You need to look REALLY closely to see that the're riveted.  Cheers.

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attachicon.gifCitrus juicer 500.jpg

 

I thought about taking it.  I resisted: I have two already (this photo is of one of mine) and have given others to all my friends who would appreciate one.  I didn't need another.  Maybe it would find a good home with someone who needed it.  

I've always wanted one of these.

 

For all the people wringing their hands and soiling themselves over acidic foods and bare aluminum, take a look.  Can't get much more acidic or concentrated.  Get over it, I say.

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I found these 3 knives for a total of $9.00. They normally go for about $27 each at the local restaurant supply stores. They will be for my ren faire kitchens.

 

Dxter_KNives.jpg

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Porthos Potwatcher
The Once and Future Cook

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I've always wanted one of these.

 

For all the people wringing their hands and soiling themselves over acidic foods and bare aluminum, take a look.  Can't get much more acidic or concentrated.  Get over it, I say.

 

The question is how long the acid sits in the aluminum container. I'd guess with a citrus juicer, not too long.  With a tomato-based stew, hours 'n' hours.  That said, I sure wish I'd kept my old aluminum Dutch oven when I moved years ago (that was at the height of the anti-aluminum scare) -- it was seasoned so beautifully, cooked and cleaned up like a champ, and a great size.  Where was my brain when I threw it out?!?

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Smart & Final raised the price on one of the 12" "scalloped edge" slicer knives  but the other (the one I have found is the perfect bread knife)  is still about $15.00  -  the P94805.

 

The "sani-safe" one  S140-112SC-PCP  is twice that price. 

 

That 12" blade works so well in cutting across boules and I have one I use only for cutting large cakes - cutting angel food cakes into layers, etc.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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Smart & Final raised the price on one of the 12" "scalloped edge" slicer knives  but the other (the one I have found is the perfect bread knife)  is still about $15.00  -  the P94805.

 

The "sani-safe" one  S140-112SC-PCP  is twice that price. 

 

That 12" blade works so well in cutting across boules and I have one I use only for cutting large cakes - cutting angel food cakes into layers, etc.

 

Good to see you around!  How are you going? 

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I took my dog (Aston, the Basenji) for a walk early this morning - before the heat rose.

 

In the next block I came across a yard sale (grandmother going into assisted living place, no room for much of her stuff) that consisted mostly of china, glassware and etc.

They weren't open yet but since I am a familiar neighbor, they allowed me to pick out a few things and fill a box.

She said $10.00 and I did not haggle.  and since I had no cash with me, I said I would be back as soon as I took the dog home and got my "wheels" on which to transport the rather heavy box.

 

Since the guy was going out to pick up something at the local donut shop, he offered to transport the box to my house.

 

He arrived just after I loosed Aston in the yard and even carried the box into the kitchen for me.

 

Not a bad haul for 10.00

Three Bauer bowls, a Watt bowl, an early Metlox casserole,  a "majolica" shallow dish, cream color with polychrome flowers and foilage - Wade, England - perfect, not even a "fleabite" and a Shenango butter pat.  Also a couple of odds & ends that looked interesting. 

HPIM7428.JPG

HPIM7430.JPG

HPIM7433.JPG

HPIM7432.JPG

 

 

P.S.  Sylvia, prior to my aortic valve replacement, I could only walk about 10 feet.  Now I can walk 2 blocks easily and am increasing my range every week.

HPIM7429.JPG

Edited by andiesenji (log)
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"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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Wow!  Love the majolica plate. 

I love it too.  And am surprised that it is in such nice condition.  Usually these have chips around the rather thin edges.

 

The little brown pot with a lid is a McCoy covered sugar - I think I may have the matching creamer somewhere in my stuff.  Sadly the matching teapot was broken in the '94 earthquake.

 

All of the earthenware bowls are from the 1930s, as is the little butter pat. 

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"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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Wanted a second Dutch oven so I can bake two loaves of no-knead bread at the same time but never expected to find one for $20 in such good condition. Kerry Beal objected to the colour but I don't care if it's sky blue pink with yellow dots so long as it does the job. And the small pie plate will do much more than pies in this solo household.

 

Anna,

 

I think it's in wonderful condition. I'm with Kerry, I don't like the color, but I'm also with you. It's in too good a shape to pass up.

 

And I have to tell you, I thought my mother made up "sky blue pink with purple polka dots." I've never heard with yellow dots, but it cracked me up!

Tracy

Lenexa, KS, USA

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When we are in our 'other' home in Utah, we go to yard sales and second-hand stores with regularity.  Great fun.  However, at home...not so much.  If at all. 

But yesterday, I had a sudden urge to stop at a local yard sale.  No reason.  And then I saw them and fell in love and had to take them home.  I cook a lot of Mexican food and every August we host the Dog Weekend and much food is eaten.  These will come in handy, and in the meantime, have a place of honor on the dining room table.


new bowls.JPG

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Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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Beautiful,  Had I been able, I would have grabbed them out form under you!  My everyday Corelle Wear dishes has a band of chilies running around the edge.  I am always looking for cool things to go with them  Recently I did find four pretty neat soup mugs featuring a Tabasco Sauce label on them  Your neat find would fit right in.  Congrats on a great score.

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  • 1 month later...

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A barely used Magic Bullet for five dollars and a Cambro flat container for $.90. Don't sneer at the Magic Bullet-- they can be quite effective and for five dollars it's hard to go wrong.

  • Like 7

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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  • 2 weeks later...

While we were in Florida, Mr. Kim picked this up at Relics (a salvage place that our friends took us to):

med_gallery_3331_122_94396.jpg

1930’s McGraw toaster.  We bought a few things, so he’s not sure, but he thinks he got it for about $40.  I shined it up and it looks gorgeous.  It gets hot, but I haven’t tried to make toast in it yet.  The fact that it belonged to strangers is squicking me out a little bit.

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While we were in Florida, Mr. Kim picked this up at Relics (a salvage place that our friends took us to):

med_gallery_3331_122_94396.jpg

1930’s McGraw toaster.  We bought a few things, so he’s not sure, but he thinks he got it for about $40.  I shined it up and it looks gorgeous.  It gets hot, but I haven’t tried to make toast in it yet.  The fact that it belonged to strangers is squicking me out a little bit.

 

My God, a work of art.  My Sunbeam T-20 just died, so I want one of these.

 

Are you interested in selling it?

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So...it isn't as though I expect much use for this, but I confess to the occasional temptation for a kitchen torch.  Look what I found at Goodwill!

 

Bargain torch 3 bucks.jpg

 

3 bucks, never opened.

  • Like 6

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

Follow us on social media! Facebook; instagram.com/egulletx; twitter.com/egullet

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)
"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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