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Darienne

Yard Sale, Thrift Store, Junk Heap Shopping (Part 2)

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My daughter wanted to go thrift shopping to look for knitting needles that could be used on-stage at renaissance re-enactment events. Sure, I'll take you thrift shopping. No needles for her but for me:

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A nice heavyweight 10" Revere fry pan from when they were made in Riverside, California. $5.39. I don't think the original owner ever cleaned the copper bottom once.

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3 Cambro cold/prep pans for the grand sum of $2.00. My wife said "I thought you weren't buying any more Cambro stuff." Well ...

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You can never have too much Cambro... I repurposed some of my old, discolored, translucent containers to use as planting pots. Drilled holds in the sides, next to the bottom for drainage and planted herbs in them - especially the thymes, sages and oregano plants that so often become pot-bound. I can see the roots against the sides and can pull them out, divide the plant and repot easily.

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Y'all are making me think I need to check out the garage sales and thrift stores more often!

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I picked up a 10" Tramontina non-stick saute pan in very good condition for $5.39 this week. Already used it several times.

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Another RWP Wilton platter, this one for serving dessert to our guild's head table at the Renaissance Pleasure Faire. $9.00.

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Not exactly thrift store shopping but still wanted to share as these were purchased during a Ladies Who Lunch excursion to J Town, a Japanese shopping enclave in Markham, Ontario.

The plate was from a combination kitchenware store and cafe. The small baking tray and rack and the microwave trivet were from the grocery/bakery/butcher store.

The microwave trivet allows one to heat a bowl of soup and still carry it to the table without fear of a burn. It stays cool. I love shopping in a Japanese kitchenware store. They seem to sell gadgets that solve problems I didin't know I had!

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The small baking tray looks like it just fit in my toaster oven! I love it!

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Not exactly thrift store shopping but still wanted to share as these were purchased during a Ladies Who Lunch excursion to J Town, a Japanese shopping enclave in Markham, Ontario.

Had no idea that shopping mall was there. I have to go to Markham once a week -- but J Town is now a destination! Thank you!

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Today, after lunch, Kerry and I went thrift store shopping and she spotted these two small bowls which I was happy to add to my growing collection.

I hope Kerry will share her finds later.

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I notice Anna hasn't mentioned the other two bowls she was set to purchase yesterday when I sent them plunging to the ground just before we paid for them. They did not survive the fall. She was waffling about buying them anyway! (That's my story and I'm sticking to it)

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So I found a nice little cast iron skillet to replace the one up north - next time I'm doing a hot burn on the Big Green Egg I'll throw it in with the coal to clean it up.

A wooden rolling pin as requested by my brother-in-law, a couple of little loaf pans - always useful. A little anchor glass bowl - I've broken a couple and still have lids for them (rug rat's lunch goes in them). And the best piece that Anna spotted - a 9 bottle wine rack that is perfectly compact - just what is called for on my shelving to hold some stray bottles.

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I found a mystery thingie! It appears to be some kind of mould for producing roses, but I have no idea whether it's intended for use with fondant or cake or what. I'm hoping one of you wonderful folks knows what it is for sure.

Bears the legend "Wilton 1972" on the top of the hinge, and "Chicago 60643 Made in Korea 510 500" on the bottom. Appears to be cast aluminum.

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I love this thread!!!, A few months ago I was checking the yard sale ads in our local paper, and spotted one that had a bowl lift Kitchen Aid stand mixer with some attachments, So hubby and I made sure to get there early and it was $125.00. I promptly picked it up and wrote her a check. I didn't really need it, since I have 2 of the smaller ones, but I make a lot of cakes and sometimes had both of the other ones in use at the same time. Plus since this one had a bigger bowl, I found I could make up to 3 recipes at time in it.

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So Kerry Beal went off to the cheap bookstore in St. Catherines with her hubby and my wish list. She was only able to find one from my list, The Truck Food Cookbook, but Kerry never shows up at my house emptied-handed or even nearly so! This is the haul now sitting on my coffee table. The hardest part is deciding where to start but once I make that decision I will try to give each of them a short review after testing two or three recipes.

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Looks like an interesting stash of books. I'll be interested to hear what the Samuelson book is like.

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Was having trouble attaching my Buchner funnel to a vacuum source - Foodsaver was a brilliant idea - alas the connections defeated me. Found this little baby in a Goodwill - problem solved!

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I found this a while back. I think it was at a thrift store, but I'm not really sure. There are no markings, that I can discern. It appears that the wire handle is steel, and that the pan itself is tinned copper and about 6" in diameter. I think that the tin is worn off in spots. The bottom of the pan is not flat in the slightest, and looks like it's seen its fair share of heavy use or abuse.

Any ideas about what this might have been used for, once upon a time?

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I found this a while back. I think it was at a thrift store, but I'm not really sure. There are no markings, that I can discern. It appears that the wire handle is steel, and that the pan itself is tinned copper and about 6" in diameter. I think that the tin is worn off in spots. The bottom of the pan is not flat in the slightest, and looks like it's seen its fair share of heavy use or abuse.

Any ideas about what this might have been used for, once upon a time?

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Looks like the bottom of a popcorn popper.

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It's an old sauce pan which, like many from that era - around the turn of the last century to the 1940s, were made for use on a wood or coal range and the circumference of the bottom would allow it to be set into the opening when one of the range top lids was removed. Just using the pan for beating the contents with a wooden spoon would be enough to round out the bottom of the pan. I have a couple that look like that and I saw them in use when I was a child.

Pans like that were made by independent artisans, formed from sheet copper over wooden forms and the top rims turned over the "wire" handle by hand. The tin lining is easy because tin melts at a fairly low temp and one used to be able to buy re-tinning kits for copper cookware.

I was born and raised in western Kentucky and in the 1940s there was a copper smith who made pot stills (for the legal whiskey makers) and also made cookware somewhat similar to this as a sideline. He was in business with his brother who made barrels for the whiskey makers.

My grandmother had one of the large copper "boilers" used for certain types of laundry that was designed for use on a wood/coal kitchen range.

Incidentally, the county in which I was born and grew up was a "dry" county - no liquor, but Cooper Tillson (as he was known) was never short of business.

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Very cool. Thanks, Andie! You always have good information.

I don't have a wood stove, but I think I will use this particular piece as decoration.

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