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Dinner! 2013 (Part 3)


patrickamory
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Morkai - Lovely lamb indeed.

Yellowtail with fingerlings, fava beans, lemon, and savory crème fraîche - based on Suzanne Goin's recipe which I now make regularly. The original recipe calls for halibut, other than that I stayed true to the recipe. I could never find savory in the store so I ended up growing it in my small garden just for this recipe...

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Lamb Burger seasoned with Ras el Hanout spices, havarti cheese, sliced red onion and a greek yogurt cucumber/dill dressing. A slice of tomato and a lettuce leaf would have added color, but it really wasn't necessary on this whopper. And the important element of a great burger, a properly buttered and toasted brioche bun.

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My Caesar Salad with romaine and butter lettuce. The croutons are rough cut off an Italian loaf and then drenched with garlic olive oil and butter and baked til golden. The dressing is old-style with garlic olive oil, dry mustard, Worcestershire, lots of lemon juice, lots of black pepper, a coddled egg, anchovies and a new punch with capers. Oh, and lots of parmesan and asiago.

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Anne - the fish & chips looks perfectly fried. Can you elaborate on the sauce?

Heidi, I just "winged" a tartar sauce.... Chopped dill pickle, green onions, garlic, mayonnaise, fresh chopped dill, just a little chopped basil and parsley, Dijon mustard, a squeeze of fresh lemon, salt and pepper.

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Malloreddus with pork, sage and hyssop:

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Lovely. What does hyssop taste like, and do you know the difference between malloreddus and cavatelli (not a trick question, just thought that they looked alike)? Edited by FrogPrincesse (log)
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Thanks guys. Malloreddus comes from Sardinia and takes significantly longer to cook than cavatelli - it really has a chewy, dense texture. The only restaurant I've ever encountered it was a Sardinian place on Holland Park Ave. in London a few years ago.

Hyssop is a resiny herb and survives every winter on my terrace. I could best compare it to summer savory, but it's much more intense - really closer to sage (and actually smells a bit like marijuana when rubbed).

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thanks furzzy and Kim.

LOTS of good looking pix of food. LOL.

tonight:

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Green leaf lettuce, braised with French butter, shallots and morels


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Razmah over rice

Razmah or rajma is the Kashmiri version of red beans and rice.

It's Monday, after all. ;)

Edited by SobaAddict70 (log)
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Ann T I am almost ashamed to post this picture after looking at your delicious roast chicken and spuds. Those potatoes are perfect!

David Ross THAT BURGER!! I WANT IT!!!

basquecook Are you a chef? Your food certainly looks very cheffy.

Morkai have to agree - the lamb looks incredible. You can see the juices glistening in that photo. Love it!

Anyway, dinner tonight.

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Nutmeg roast chicken from Spice Trip - recipe here.

Chicken: deviated from the recipe by injecting a 10% brine into the deboned chook. I rubbed it with nutmeg then left it for 24 hours to marinade. It was then panfried and roasted on a bed of onions, garlic, and thyme to an internal temperature of 60C.

Simple roast potatoes: Baby Nicola potatoes were parboiled for 20 minutes, then panfried in duck fat. They went into the oven at 180C for 45 minutes, next to the chicken.

Wilted spinach: Baby spinach leaves were wilted on a frypan with some butter, salt, and lemon juice.

Result: The chicken had a really assertive nutmeg flavour. I found it a little overpowering, and could have done with some balance from other spices. Roasting the chicken over onions made for a beautiful sauce - plenty of flavour in those moist onions.

There is no love more sincere than the love of food - George Bernard Shaw
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Thanks guys. Malloreddus comes from Sardinia and takes significantly longer to cook than cavatelli - it really has a chewy, dense texture. The only restaurant I've ever encountered it was a Sardinian place on Holland Park Ave. in London a few years ago.

Hyssop is a resiny herb and survives every winter on my terrace. I could best compare it to summer savory, but it's much more intense - really closer to sage (and actually smells a bit like marijuana when rubbed).

Thanks for all the info Patrick. I just read that hyssop was one of the "essential" components in Chartreuse and Benedictine so now I am really intrigued. I will plant some if I can find seeds.

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Ann_t – I wish I had those Carnitas with homemade corn tortillas for a hot rainy day dinner yesterday.

Ranz - very nice looking pork belly.

Keith – You always can make a very decent roasted chicken.

SobaAddit – I look forward to your fantastic use of vegetables.

Mm84321 – obviously my dishes on this post is inspired by your Pea cromesquis.

David Ross – You can really make a common everyday Caesar Salad look special.

Patrickamory – A very attractive Malloreddus with pork, sage and hyssop display.

FrogPrincesse – I love the way you plate your food.

Baselerd – Nice photo.

Kim – T-bone looks great. Nothing wrong with Rice-a-Roni. I enjoy it once in a while.

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Playing with making perfectly round and perfectly sized stuffed meatballs and Arancini (cromesquis? Whatever.)

dcarch

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Edited by dcarch (log)
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Wow. I don't normally venture out of the pastry forums but there are some stunning bits of food on display here! Its making me very hungry!!

Although I stick more to the chocolatiering/patisserie/baking side of food, I recently promised my other half I would devise and cook her a 10-course tasting menu for her birthday. So this was my first attempt - some things really pleased with, some things not as happy with but all tasted good at least!

Course 1: Gaspacho Granita Cacao

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Course 2: Baby Artichokes with pea puree & cumin foam

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Course 3: Sea Bass with White Chocolate & Dill

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Course 4: Sous vide pork belly with apple BBQ sauce & apple spaetzle

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Course 5:Venison with s Mushroom & Single Malt whisky sauce

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Course 6: Carpaccio of Beef Fillet with Fennel puree

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Course 7: Goat's cheese, Beetroot, Olive Tuile

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Course 8: Deconstruction of Lemon Meringue

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Course 9: Single plantation Peruvian Chocolate, Figs, Lavendar Honey

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Course 10: Inverted Affagato (I.e. espresso sorbet with warm vanilla sauce), Cardamom & Coconut Panna Cotta, White chocolate espuma

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I need to work on my presentation for sure but it was a long slog getting it all served out every 15 mins! Great fun though, recommend anyone to give it a go with good planning it can work!

J

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That looks amazing Choc Doc - I can't imagine how much prep you had to do for that (sounds fun).

I did a four-course once for Valentine's Day and that was a ton of fun, although I don't know if I'm ambitious enough to go for ten.

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Wow Choc Doc, you put a lot of work into that meal. Some great ideas there and lovely plating as well. Hats off to you.

There is no love more sincere than the love of food - George Bernard Shaw
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