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Easiest Way For Making Cake


sachishah
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The Joy of Cooking...my first cookbook from the days when I loathed cooking...has a section of quick and easy cakes, p.635 in the hard cover edition. I never made any of them, but they look useful.

I second that and I HAVE made a lot of those cakes and they are good and the directions are clear.

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Hi, the easiest cake in the world:

Break 3 eggs and weigh them (everything, white and yolk)

Weigh the same quantity of flour, butter and sugar.

Put in the blender, add a pinch of salt, 3 tsp of baking powder, 1 tsp on vanilla, 6 tbsp of cocoa powder and half a glass of milk.

Blend very well, put in a silicon mold of 10-11 in. of diameter, cover with aluminum foil and put in pre-heated oven at 350 F (180 Cº).

After 40 minutes take away the aluminum foil, and bake for other 20 minutes.

You can't go wrong!

My Italian Homemade Liqueurs and Pastries recipes at: http://italianliqueurs.blogspot.com.es

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Pound cakes are easy because the recipe is in the name - one pound of everything. Basically you have 4 ingredients - butter, sugar, eggs and flour, and you use equal quantities of each (doesn't have to be 1 pound, but if it is you'll have lots of cake).

The trickiest part is to remember that an egg is roughly 60g (2 oz), and that you'll want to use SR Flour.

You mix together the butter and sugar until creamy, then mix through the eggs, then the flour.

Cupcakes are usually made from a pound cake recipe and it's a very rich, moist type of cake.

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I avoid the silicon pans for cakes, they are made from insulating material and increase the baking time needed, they prevent formation of bloom on the sides and bottom while allowing the top to overcook, and cake tend to stick to them. I only use them for custards and cheesecakes. Cheap metal pans work very well, and are what real bakeries use.

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Thanks Lisa for the information on silicon pans. Never read that before and it's useful to know.

Yeah, someplace around here is a thread where a bunch of us rag on silicon cake pans and the worse-than-useless cupcake liners. (at least for cupcakes, I am sure someone cooks mini-meatloaf in them or something, with some success)

There's another thread about how most of use hate the floppy silicon molds being sold for chocolate making as well. (make ice cubes, make cheesecake bites, mold sorbets, but, don't try to make filled bon-bons in a silicon mold!)

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  • 1 month later...

I was so hopeful when they started making those silicone molds! But hopes dashed. have re-purposed them for re-freezing small portions of boirin fruit purees (seriously - does anyone in a home kitchen need a whole kilo of passion fruit puree at once? can't they sell in 8oz overpriced portions?), juice from those lemons that are gonna go bad before I get around to making the curd I was planning for, etc. And then once in a blue moon I'll use one for tiny cakes or something like that (they're so small the crap browning isn't much of an issue).

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