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"Chocolate Desserts" by Pierre Herme (Part 2)


Patrick S
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As you can see I think I did not whip the chocolate with the little bit of cream properly. That resulted in small pieces of solidified chocolate in the mousse, but they tasted very good, like little specks of chocolate chip.

I've had the same problem with other mousse recipes. I don't have the book in front of me, but I am assuming the recipe has you incorporate the cool cream into the warm chocolate, and then a pate a bombe into the chocolate+cream. However, I have found that if you fold the pate a bombe into the chocolate first, and then the whipped cream, it seems to come together far better.

"If you hear a voice within you say 'you cannot paint,' then by all means paint, and that voice will be silenced" - Vincent Van Gogh
 

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As you can see I think I did not whip the chocolate with the little bit of cream properly. That resulted in small pieces of solidified chocolate in the mousse, but they tasted very good, like little specks of chocolate chip.

I've had the same problem with other mousse recipes. I don't have the book in front of me, but I am assuming the recipe has you incorporate the cool cream into the warm chocolate, and then a pate a bombe into the chocolate+cream. However, I have found that if you fold the pate a bombe into the chocolate first, and then the whipped cream, it seems to come together far better.

You are right Patrick. The first thing we are asked to incorporate into the chocolate is a little whipped cream. What is Pate A Bombe??? I'm assuming you mean the custard right? I will try incorporating that into the chocolate first next time around. Honestly though my wife and I are very happy with this treat of a dessert, the chocolate "chips" are not a problem. Now, if I was making chocolate mousse then they would be.

E. Nassar
Houston, TX

My Blog
contact: enassar(AT)gmail(DOT)com

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Ellie, I like the look of the semifreddo in a loaf and, even though I know it's not the way it's supposed to be, I like the way the cream looks with the little chunks of chocolate speckling it. I remember once, when Pierre and I were working together in the kitchen, I complained about the way a cake batter looked as I was beating it -- it was really curdled. And he said, "Never mind about how it looks, the only important thing is how it tastes!" Well, you seemed to have gotten looks and taste -- good job!

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As you can see I think I did not whip the chocolate with the little bit of cream properly. That resulted in small pieces of solidified chocolate in the mousse, but they tasted very good, like little specks of chocolate chip.

I've had the same problem with other mousse recipes. I don't have the book in front of me, but I am assuming the recipe has you incorporate the cool cream into the warm chocolate, and then a pate a bombe into the chocolate+cream. However, I have found that if you fold the pate a bombe into the chocolate first, and then the whipped cream, it seems to come together far better.

You are right Patrick. The first thing we are asked to incorporate into the chocolate is a little whipped cream. What is Pate A Bombe??? I'm assuming you mean the custard right? I will try incorporating that into the chocolate first next time around. Honestly though my wife and I are very happy with this treat of a dessert, the chocolate "chips" are not a problem. Now, if I was making chocolate mousse then they would be.

Pate a bombe is the whipped mixture of hot syrup and yolks. I'm sure the chips are not problem -- just another layer of texture. I just wanted to give you an FYI because I had experienced the same thing you describe.

"If you hear a voice within you say 'you cannot paint,' then by all means paint, and that voice will be silenced" - Vincent Van Gogh
 

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Thanks for the compliment Dorie.

Patrick, this one does not use the hot syrup/yolk mixture. The mousse is instead made with a thick custard (yolks+sugar+cream), whipped cream and whipped stiff meringue (whites+sugar).

E. Nassar
Houston, TX

My Blog
contact: enassar(AT)gmail(DOT)com

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Thanks for the compliment Dorie.

Patrick, this one does not use the hot syrup/yolk mixture. The mousse is instead made with a thick custard (yolks+sugar+cream), whipped cream and whipped stiff meringue (whites+sugar).

Ah, I see.

"If you hear a voice within you say 'you cannot paint,' then by all means paint, and that voice will be silenced" - Vincent Van Gogh
 

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I can't find their chocolate products or chocolate prices on their site. Am I missing something obvious or did they remove it?

I stopped by there warehouse a couple of weeks ago and bought up all the half-price, slightly distressed Valrhona Jivara and white chocolate. The Jivara was $7.25/ Kg and the white $10/kg. They were alittle beaten up, but a good deal nonetheless. Some of the Jivara was slightly bloomed, but was totally fine for chocolate making.

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Assouline and Ting in Philadelphia seems to have the best prices on Valrhona I've seen (about $7.90/lb), although it's still to much for me.

Wow, they're much cheaper than chocosphere! Like 30% cheaper on the few items I checked. For instance, Assouline and Ting has 3kg Valrhona Guanaja Feves for $54.96. Chocosphere sells the same thing for $79.95.

I can't find their chocolate products or chocolate prices on their site. Am I missing something obvious or did they remove it?

Here see if you can see it if you didnt already.I bought form them couple of time and Iam please , package isnt fancy ,lots of shredded paper , but the chocolate got here in 3 days with no trouble .Definally good price including the shipping .For a 36 lb shipping was 18.00 usually its pretty standard around the 22 lb etc.

http://www.icaviar.com/Store/Scripts/prodL...?idCategory=387

Edited by Desiderio (log)

Vanessa

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  • 1 month later...

I received Pierre Hermes recipe for Dacquoise from a friend when I was looking for a good recipe for it. In deciding to make this I found this thread. I finished reading all 31 pages a couple days ago. I love the thread and now want all the books.

I was craving something with hazelnuts, chocolate and coffee so I added some thing to the recipe. I made an extra half batch of dacquoise and made three disks. I decided to try the caramel ganache because I've been wanting to try it. On the first layer a used a stabilized whipped cream flavored with espresso powder.

It turned out really fantastic. The different textures were wonderful, and the taste was exactly what I wanted. My pictures aren't great, but they give you an idea.

gallery_32986_3238_545021.jpg

gallery_32986_3238_201431.jpg

Edited by Becca Porter (log)

-Becca

www.porterhouse.typepad.com

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Thank you so much, Dorie. It is wonderful to have you reply. I have a few of your books requested from my library. I cannot wait to have a look at them. I am sure I will be forced to purchase them.

-Becca

www.porterhouse.typepad.com

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I was planning to attempt the plaisir sucre a few weeks ago, but got sidelined. For when I have time to bake again, though -- what do ya'll think of preparing the plaisir sucre in smaller portions (almost like minis)? I have a number of family members who have to watch their sugar intake, and I'm trying to help them exercise portion control. :laugh:

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That can be easily done - sizing the plaisir sucre. The other thing is that its not as hard as it looks in the book - just make it in stages in the days preceeding when you are ready to serve. Also, my non-chocolate loving friends found it way too decadent and only ate a biteful or two...

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Last week I made this gorgeous thing for my wife's baby shower at her work.

gallery_5404_94_358852.jpg

Sorry I did not take more pics since it was not "carved" at home.

What a to reverse Dorie's words 'simply deceptive' cake to make. What I mean is that it looks simple (cake/ganache) but it is anything but. I think this is one of my top chocolate cakes of all time. So rich (3 sticks of butter in that ganache) but so light in texture at the same time. She was nice to bring back a large chunk back for me and I ate it all in one sitting. I've never seen a "base" chocolate cake recipe like the one in this book, it looks dense but is very soft and moist and strong enough to handle filling/topping. Did I already say how good that ganache was?....

E. Nassar
Houston, TX

My Blog
contact: enassar(AT)gmail(DOT)com

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Becca, your first picture looks like the work of a pro! No need to criticize yourself.

I like that squiggle on the top of your pave, FoodMan.

"I don't mean to brag, I don't mean to boast;

but we like hot butter on our breakfast toast!"

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  • 4 weeks later...

FoodMan, you're a pretty swell guy to make that cake for your wife -- but she's pretty swell to bring you back a taste. It's still such a favorite of mine and I love the way you described it.

And GFron, I like the way your croquettes in coconut milk-tapioca look. I'm sorry you didn't like the soup, but it's great that you'll use the croquettes again. I think the possibilities to mix and match are part of what makes dessertmaking so much fun -- and so creative. Did you like the hot-cold combination?

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Ohhh Dorie, you're going to force a confession out of me...The hot cold was great, and like I said the croquettes were incredible. (here comes the confession) But, I reached in the fridge to get my cream and poured it only to realize as it was coming out of the container, that it was actually buttermilk :shock: . It was late and I didn't have any cream to start over with. So I forged ahead using the ginger simple syrup that was formed with the ginger strips, and poured the simple sugar into the soup. Needless to say that wasn't enough to counteract the buttermilk. So, staying positive here, the croquettes were incredible...did I mention the croquettes yet :) I will try again!

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I have a question about the chocolate caramel ganache.. I know butter is often added to ganaches to richen the flavor but in this recipe a whole three sticks is added. Now of course this can only be good :raz: but more specifically, how does all that butter affect the end product? Does it become so thick that it is a spreadable only ganache, not pourable, and if so could you reduce the amount of butter to achieve different styles of ganache? Can you whip it? Sorry if this is discussed in the book, I don't have it, I just saw the recipe posted in the chocolate cake thread some time ago and have had it filed away and am thinking of using it this weekend for my brother's birthday cake. Though, from all the wonderful looking desserts, I am certainly tempted to get this book..

Michelle Pham

I like pie.

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I have a question about the chocolate caramel ganache.. I know butter is often added to ganaches to richen the flavor but in this recipe a whole three sticks is added. Now of course this can only be good  :raz: but more specifically, how does all that butter affect the end product? Does it become so thick that it is a spreadable only ganache, not pourable, and if so could you reduce the amount of butter to achieve different styles of ganache? Can you whip it? Sorry if this is discussed in the book, I don't have it, I just saw the recipe posted in the chocolate cake thread some time ago and have had it filed away and am thinking of using it this weekend for my brother's birthday cake. Though, from all the wonderful looking desserts, I am certainly tempted to get this book..

There are two caramel ganache recipes in the book, one for truffles and one for the Pave. The ganache for the Pave is not pourable, if you make it according to the recipe in the book. The truffle ganache is like a typical ganache.

"If you hear a voice within you say 'you cannot paint,' then by all means paint, and that voice will be silenced" - Vincent Van Gogh
 

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