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What Beers Did You Drink Today? Or Yesterday? (Part 2)


BrentKulman
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Dan, interesting that you're using chiles in your brew. Earlier tonight I caught up with some friends at a local pub and while there sampled Night Shift Brewery's Viva Habanera beer. It was smooth, more malt than hops, with a touch of sweetness balanced by the citrus/floral of the habanero pepper. The heat was very muted but it was there, catching you a bit at the back of the throat but it always stayed in the background. Not at all spicy but nevertheless a sipping beer.


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Dan, interesting that you're using chiles in your brew. Earlier tonight I caught up with some friends at a local pub and while there sampled Night Shift Brewery's Viva Habanera beer. It was smooth, more malt than hops, with a touch of sweetness balanced by the citrus/floral of the habanero pepper. The heat was very muted but it was there, catching you a bit at the back of the throat but it always stayed in the background. Not at all spicy but nevertheless a sipping beer.

I don't remember who made it, but I once had a beer aged in a Tabasco barrel. That was a little overkill. This is my second time brewing with chiles. I had a few items laying around, so I brewed a wheat beer with agave syrup, guajillos and pasillas.

"Salt is born of the purest of parents: the sun and the sea." --Pythagoras.

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  • 1 month later...

Recent ones I remember

- Coopers Vintage '12. Unsurprisingly good. Have put a handful in the wine cupboard. Will revisit them when I remember they exist ... or forget the whole point is to give them at least a year.

- Chimay Grande Reserve. Still maybe my favourite beer.

Chris Taylor

Host, eG Forums - ctaylor@egstaff.org

 

I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

Melbourne
Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between

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Recent ones I remember

- Coopers Vintage '12. Unsurprisingly good. Have put a handful in the wine cupboard. Will revisit them when I remember they exist ... or forget the whole point is to give them at least a year.

- Chimay Grande Reserve. Still maybe my favourite beer.

Chimay Bleue is also one of my favorites.

I tried this one the other day.

7998504649_0d2c79596a_z.jpg

It's the Brett Beer from the Lips of Faith series, a collaboration between The Lost Abbey, a local brewery from San Marcos, and New Belgium. Very nice summery beer with tropical fruit undertones, a little acidic.

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"Brett Beer"? I can't say the marketing appeals to me...

Why not? Brett (Brettanomyces) is type of yeast that is found in many great Belgian beers such as lambic, gueuze and Orval trappist ale.

Sure, but in minute quantities, right? My understanding is that in large doses, it's more often associated with off-flavours. So I would be hesitant about putting it front and centre in the name there.

I was recently in a local restaurant when the distributor for a nearby cider-maker came through, and he was marketing their "pub cider" as being brett-forward, citing the traditions of some region of England or another. I liked it, but a friend of mine ordered a pint (on a different night, at a different restaurant), and thought it tasted off. When I identified for him some of the aromas often associated with brett, he couldn't bring himself to finish the pint!

But of course, as in all things, your mileage may vary. Your description certainly makes it sound like a nice beer.

Matthew Kayahara

Kayahara.ca

@mtkayahara

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This time of year I am looking for an interesting pumpkin ale that tastes more like pumpkin pie than an ale with pumpkin spice. Last night was the Weyerbacher imperial Pumpkin Ale. Not bad but more pumpkin spice than pumpkin pie to me.

The quest will continue.

If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous, he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and a man. ~Mark Twain

Some people are like a Slinky. They are not really good for anything, but you still can't help but smile when you shove them down the stairs...

~tanstaafl2

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It's a cider, sure, but yes. Henry of Harcourt makes some of the best ciders in Australia. Maybe the best. I mean, it's not like, off the top of my head, I can think of anything better. But their 2Pear seasonal/limited/whatever edition, man, that's nice. Clean and crisp. Dry. Only lightly (bottle) carbonated. I doubt he makes enough to export--yeah, there's a guy called Henry in a place called Harcourt that's unsurpsingly known for growing apples and pears and, in recent years, cider--but if he does, if it turns up somehow, it's all worthwhile.

Chris Taylor

Host, eG Forums - ctaylor@egstaff.org

 

I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

Melbourne
Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between

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Lately I've been enjoying the beers from local Notch Brewing Company, most recently Squirrel Brew, created for a local fundraiser and named in honor of an albino squirrel in my neighborhood. Notch specializes in Session beer, ie. low-alcohol beer. A nice option for those days when you want a beer or two with lunch but don't want a mid-day nap. Most importantly, delicous.


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Visiting, sort of, Harcourt again. Not literally. But with booze. This time it's Sightings' American Pale Ale, which I picked up on a recent trip to the area. Found a bottle-o that sold a lot of locally made beers. It's nice enough, I suppose. Perhaps even good enough to qualify as very good. A bit hoppy but not overly so. Crisp with a slightly bitter finish. It's not like this stuff is sitting on the shelves anywhere near where I live, but if I remember--next time I'm up that way and all--I might pick up some more at some point.

Chris Taylor

Host, eG Forums - ctaylor@egstaff.org

 

I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

Melbourne
Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between

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"Brett Beer"? I can't say the marketing appeals to me...

Why not? Brett (Brettanomyces) is type of yeast that is found in many great Belgian beers such as lambic, gueuze and Orval trappist ale.

Sure, but in minute quantities, right? My understanding is that in large doses, it's more often associated with off-flavours. So I would be hesitant about putting it front and centre in the name there.

I was recently in a local restaurant when the distributor for a nearby cider-maker came through, and he was marketing their "pub cider" as being brett-forward, citing the traditions of some region of England or another. I liked it, but a friend of mine ordered a pint (on a different night, at a different restaurant), and thought it tasted off. When I identified for him some of the aromas often associated with brett, he couldn't bring himself to finish the pint!

But of course, as in all things, your mileage may vary. Your description certainly makes it sound like a nice beer.

Brett in beer presents itself differently than in beer than it does in cider or wine. While the typical "horseblanket" character that it brings is not appreciated by all, that character can be quite appealing when complemented by certain malts and hops.

That said, the LA/New Belgium collaboration is a fairly average beer with little Brett character despite being (what I believe to be) a 100% Brett fermented beer.

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That said, the LA/New Belgium collaboration is a fairly average beer with little Brett character despite being (what I believe to be) a 100% Brett fermented beer.

It does take some time for the Brett to work its magic so you cannot really judge a Brett beer's ultimate flavor profile upon the initial release. I would wait a year or more before making a final judgment.

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That said, the LA/New Belgium collaboration is a fairly average beer with little Brett character despite being (what I believe to be) a 100% Brett fermented beer.

It does take some time for the Brett to work its magic so you cannot really judge a Brett beer's ultimate flavor profile upon the initial release. I would wait a year or more before making a final judgment.

New Belgium/Lost Abbey's Lips of Faith - Brett Beer is a pasteurized beer. The Brett in it is no longer viable, so this beer is not going to develop in the bottle.

In terms of this particular beer, it is entirely possible to judge its quality now, because it's not going to be any different in a year than it already is.

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Rogue's maple bacon ale. Truly terrible. Developing intense feelings about gimmick beers.

I'm not a huge fan of their beer in general, but I agree - why not drink beer that tastes like beer?

It's almost never bad to feed someone.

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Rogue's maple bacon ale. Truly terrible. Developing intense feelings about gimmick beers.

Having tried that beer, I would agree with your assessment. Before you disparage all gimmick beers, the Funky Buddha Maple Bacon Coffee Porter (much harder to find since you can only get bottles from the brewpub if you are a member of their club) is a truly amazing beer. They also make a number of other gimmick beers that are outstanding, as well.

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Rogue's maple bacon ale. Truly terrible. Developing intense feelings about gimmick beers.

Having tried that beer, I would agree with your assessment. Before you disparage all gimmick beers, the Funky Buddha Maple Bacon Coffee Porter (much harder to find since you can only get bottles from the brewpub if you are a member of their club) is a truly amazing beer. They also make a number of other gimmick beers that are outstanding, as well.

The only reason I got to try this was a friend's partner--an American--had brought it over, as well as some other beers, when she moved here. I know only of a couple of places that stock a range of American beers that goes beyond Sam Adams and Sierra Nevada (which has taken off here, incidentally--I keep trying the new ones they bring out and find they're all nice enough but nothing special) and even then they don't stock anything like that.

I've no idea how the postage of such things works--I mean, I suspect there would be a lot of tax involved, particularly for me--but if it was feasible I wouldn't mind loading up a padded box with some of Australian's better craft beers in exchange for the same from the States.

Chris Taylor

Host, eG Forums - ctaylor@egstaff.org

 

I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

Melbourne
Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between

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