Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

Sign in to follow this  
bostonapothecary

Drinks (2009–2011)

Recommended Posts

Tri2Cook   

*ETA: I see there's a recent article that discusses the drink and mentions "barrel-aged Fernet Branca". As far as I know, the Fernet used in this drink at the Violet Hour comes straight of the shelf. I'm 99% sure the "barrel-aged" refers to the process by which Fernet is made, not something that happens at Violet Hour.

That may be the article I grabbed the recipe from, depends on how recent it is. I have a file on my computer for collecting interesting sounding drink recipes but I didn't include the sources with the recipes. The recipe I have matches the one you posted but I have "barrel aged" in parentheses next to the Fernet. Anyway, glad to hear that the off the shelf stuff is correct. Now I just have to try to get the local LCBO store to order it for me.


Edited by Tri2Cook (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Yojimbo   

Chris, or anyone,

What's the recipe for the smoked pineapple syrup? Now that I've gone and done the gum syrup, this seems like the next thing to tackle. It just sounds too good not to try.


Edited by Yojimbo (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Standard issue pineapple syrup (chunks; demerara 2:1 syrup; macerate for 1-2 days) but using smoked pineapple. I smoke mine for a couple hours with apple wood in Bradley.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Always a missing piece. Been interested in the Eeyore's Requiem since reading about it a while back. Couldn't remember the entire recipe but now that I have my Campari and Cynar, I dug it up. Oh yeah, needs Fernet Branca as well. :hmmm: Barrel aged, no less. The barrel aged probably won't happen anytime soon (or ever if we're being honest) but I guess I need to get that F.B. ordered soon so I can give it a less refined try. Any suggestions for giving the Cynar a try in the meantime?

I've heard recommendations of Robert Hess "Trident" more than once..

Trident

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Trident is great. So is Misty Kalkofen's Dunaway:

2 1/4 oz fino sherry (she suggests Lustau)

1/2 oz Cynar

1/2 oz maraschino

2 Angostura orange bitters

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tri2Cook   

Appreciating the suggestions and will definitely give those that I can (ingredient availability pending) a try. Had planned on checking out The Art of Choke today... so take a wild guess. Yep, the only grocery store in town is out of fresh mint. I have some in the freezer due to an overabundance last summer but I'm not sure that would do the trick.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
rmillman   

Last Mule Call:

Last Mule with muddled lime, in a tall glass over ice with ginger beer. Hit the spot.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

if you end up enjoying "Eeyore's Requiem", i can recommend a thirtyoneknots inspired drink i was served recently from Will @Drink that looked something like this:

1.5 oz. cognac

.5 oz. orgeat

.5 oz. cynar

.5 oz. zirbenz stone pine liqueur

grapefruit twist

Will's recipe was a rendering of this:

Equal parts Scarlet Ibis, Zirbenz Stone Pine, and Cynar, with dash each of Angostura and (homemade) grapefruit bitters. Up, I think I used a lemon twist.

Color me flattered! Glad to hear others are having success with that combo--I confess I haven't played with it much lately myself.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tri2Cook   

Color me flattered! Glad to hear others are having success with that combo--I confess I haven't played with it much lately myself.

Does sound interesting but no Stone Pine available through the LCBO.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

so impressed with the efforts of all the inventive and adventuresome mixers here. But tonight after work I thought I would have one

2 oz Sazarec Rye

3/8 oz each sweet and dry vermouth

2 dashes Reagans Orange Bitters and 1 dash Fee Brothers Barrel Aged

One lemon twist

My goodness that is one great drink. Things become clasics for a reason and I know the reason this one is.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tonight I'm nursing a Charles Lindbergh. Entertaining little mix of gin, Lillet and grapefruit bitters with an apricot brandy rinse. Starts off rather like a dry Martini, but ends up a bit sweet and rather apricot-y. Not the most grown-up drink I've ever had, flavour-wise, but quite pleasant.

Gave that a try, but decided that I wanted to fiddle with the gin and proportions a bit, so:

Lindbergh's Baby

2 oz Ransom Old Tom gin

1 oz Lillet blanc

dash Apry

dash Scrappy's grapefruit bitters

dash Bitter Truth Jerry Thomas Own Decanter Bitters

Stir; strain; no garnish.

It's excellent, I must say.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't think I've ever had the Ransom Old Tom, Chris, but I understand it's pretty idiosyncratic? I've only got the Hayman's, which I think would end up too sweet. Now you've got me wondering, though, how some genever would play with these flavours, maybe split half-and-half with a London Dry? Hmm...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You'd know it if you had had it!

Yeah, the Ransom isn't as sweet as Hayman's, but as you can see I added an additional dash of bitters (the JT). Lillet & Apry scares me.... Anyway, I think that you could probably adjust for the Hayman's somehow.

Ransom is sort of like Genevieve: it's something of a meta-version of a type of gin that takes it into a slightly different genre. In the case of the Ransom it's more aromatic and complex than Hayman's by a long shot. I think that it's tricky with things like sweet vermouth, but once you get the hang of it, the skies the limit. You know, kinda like Lindbergh.

Seriously, Ransom competes with Genevieve in my "one gin at the deathbed" competition.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I guess I'll add Ransom to the list of things to buy next time I'm in the US. Sigh. Please tell me its name does not reflect its price point?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been messing with the following, getting good reactions from customers, based on the Charles Lindbergh: half Beefeaters, half Cocchi Americano, barspoon R&W Apricot, 2 dashes Pummelo bitters, up with an orange twist. Probably going on a menu soon.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Should I be ashamed to admit that tonight's tipple was a Black Russian? There's just something about these simple spirit + liqueur combos that says après-ski (-snowboard, in my case) to me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Pierogi   

Should I be ashamed to admit that tonight's tipple was a Black Russian? There's just something about these simple spirit + liqueur combos that says après-ski (-snowboard, in my case) to me.

Nuttin' wrong with that mix, nuttin' at all ! Reminds me I have a pretty full bottle of Kahlua left over from making truffles at Christmas.....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cafe de Olla (Veracruz coffee, Mexican cinnamon, and piloncillo, made on the stove) with a splash from an old bottle of Chinaco Añejo (Denton import, for the connoisseurs) I found a while back but opened recently.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
haresfur   

2 oz Wild Turkey Bourbon

1 oz Campbells Rutherglen Tokay

4 dashes Peychaud's bitters

served on the rocks

a lemon twist would have been nice

Not bad. Sweet comes in many forms the trick seems to be to hit the right level and still getting the most out of the other flavour elements such as those found in this dessert wine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Last night's Thursday Drink Night at the Mixoloseum:

Bernet Frankenstein

1 1/2 oz Islay Scotch (Laphroaig Qtr Cask)

3/4 oz Fernet Branca

3/4 oz Punt e Mes

1 lf Mint

Build neat in a lowball or whiskey glass. Spank and drop mint, if you've got it (I didn't but I think it would be a good idea.) Slow mouthful of smoke, spice, earth, menthol and lingering bitter.


Edited by EvergreenDan (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Stop me if I've told you this one before... tonight's apéritif was a variation on the Rose that I like to call the Abricotier:

2 oz. Lillet

1 oz. apricot eau-de-vie (Zwack barack palinka)

1 tsp. Luxardo maraschino

1 dash peach bitters

Stir, strain, up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
TAPrice   

Had some madeira left over from the prunes stuffed with blue cheese that I made for an Oscar's party. Thought I would try a Manhattan variation.

Used a basic 2:1 ratio with Rittenhouse, added 3 dashes of Angostura, stirred, strained and added a lemon twist. Sadly, not good. Don't think the madeira is sweet or thick enough. And something isn't playing nice. Too much sharp, bitterness without a sweet base to balance it all. Oh well, at least the stuffed prunes were good.

Any other ideas for mixing with madeira (not that I'm opposed to just drinking it straight).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Had some madeira left over from the prunes stuffed with blue cheese that I made for an Oscar's party. Thought I would try a Manhattan variation.

Used a basic 2:1 ratio with Rittenhouse, added 3 dashes of Angostura, stirred, strained and added a lemon twist. Sadly, not good. Don't think the madeira is sweet or thick enough. And something isn't playing nice. Too much sharp, bitterness without a sweet base to balance it all. Oh well, at least the stuffed prunes were good.

Any other ideas for mixing with madeira (not that I'm opposed to just drinking it straight).

Cognac. Or Iberian brandies, if you can get a decent one. I've done a Manhattanish thing with Sercial Mdiera and Foie Gras washed Cognac before...didn't suck. Peychaud's was the bitters I used.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×