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Drinks! (2004–2007)


percyn
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Ok...today was the Manhattan, with the baby Sazerac.

1.5 oz Rye

.75 oz Vya sweet

2 dashes Angostura

stir/strain/up, garnish with a fat twist

Pretty nice, not gonna lie, but once again it was so...something. Light seems like such a strange word to describe straight rye, but I don't know what else to call it. I think I've more or less come to the conclusion that while I really do like the Sazerac 6 yr, and plan on keeping it around, but it probably won't replace Wild Turkey as my go-to rye (and hence, go-to whiskey). Of course, going to try to use up the bottle in different drinks this week (I've got help). Probably next on the slate is the Vieux Carre.

I had a couple of thoughts on the stuff though, namely I was wondering if anyone had any info on the mashbill for Sazerac 6 in relation to Old Overholt and Wild Turkey (the other ones I am most familiar with). Back before I knew about rye, my ultimate Manhattan was made with Maker's Mark, and I found myself comparing this Manhattan to that in a way.

The other thing is that I rarely go much for sour-type drinks based on whisk(e)y, though I can't really lay a finger on what it is about them that I don't like as much, compared to gin, rum, or brandy. However today I was sipping that Manhattan and I wondered about trying a few sour-types with it, starting with the ones that I do enjoy and moving from there. Stay tuned.

Final thoughts on that Manhattan: I'm going to try it again with Bitter Truth Aromatic Bitters, it seemed like it would be just the thing for the lighter flavor of the Sazerac (I found TBT Aromatic to be lacking in punch, though delicious).

-Andy

Andy Arrington

Journeyman Drinksmith

Twitter--@LoneStarBarman

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Tonight I cleaned out my fridge. Never a pretty sight. I did find a couple of limes in the crisper drawer that needed to get used or tossed, so I chose to make a Pomegranate margarita out of them to try and use up some of the overabundance of Pama Liqueur I have around.

2 oz. Cabo Wabo Anejo

1.5 oz. Pama pomegranate liqueur

1 oz. fresh lime juice

.75 oz. Gran Gala orange liqueur

.5 oz. spiced simple syrup ('cuz it's what I had in the fridge)

All in all a pretty tasty concoction. It was a record breaking 70+ degree day here in Philly so a summery drink didn't seem so out of place.

Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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Ok...today was the Manhattan, with the baby Sazerac.

1.5 oz Rye

.75 oz Vya sweet

2 dashes Angostura

stir/strain/up, garnish with a fat twist

Pretty nice, not gonna lie, but once again it was so...something. Light seems like such a strange word to describe straight rye, but I don't know what else to call it. I think I've more or less come to the conclusion that while I really do like the Sazerac 6 yr, and plan on keeping it around, but it probably won't replace Wild Turkey as my go-to rye (and hence, go-to whiskey).

Interesting thoughts. Not to drag too far off topic, my baby Sazerac Manhattan's use a heavier hand with the rye than 2:1. I just like them better that way.

Now I need to find a drink to get me off the Negroni jag I've been on the last 3 nights.

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I did consider tweaking the vermouth preportion as well, I'll give it a go before the bottle is empty (soon ;-)

If you like Negronis, try a Bijou (equal parts gin, red vermouth, chartreuse, dash orange bitters). It tastes very little like a Negroni and is not at all bitter, but it has the same rich quality to it. Or, feel free to adjust the ratio for a drier drink.

-Andy

Andy Arrington

Journeyman Drinksmith

Twitter--@LoneStarBarman

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I am normally not too adventurous with my "cocktails" and I certainly never invent any. I enjoy a sazerac, a negroni, a julep and of course a martini every so often. However in the last issue of Food and Wine they had a small snippet about using marmalade in cocktails and how mixologists are trying different things with them. Along with the snippet they had a recipe for a “Marmalade Sour”. I forgot what restaurant bartender invented it, but I can check when I get home if anyone is interested. In any case, it sounded so good and I have a jar of homemade Seville orange marmalade in the fridge and my Meyer lemon tree is full of ripe lemons that I decided to give it a shot. WOW! That was some good stuff. I’ve been having one a day for the past three days :unsure:. Here is the recipe from the magazine. I do not however have Cachaca on hand so I used Grey Goose vodka. I am now thinking of buying me a bottle of Cachaca to see how it works out.

2 oz Cachaca

¾ oz fresh lemon juice

1 Tbsp citrus marmalade

1 egg white

Splash of orange bitters

Splash of simple syrup

Shake with ice vigorously, strain into a cooled martini glass and drink straight up.

E. Nassar
Houston, TX

My Blog
contact: enassar(AT)gmail(DOT)com

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Tonight I cleaned out my fridge.  Never a pretty sight.  I did find a couple of limes in the crisper drawer that needed to get used or tossed, so I chose to make a Pomegranate margarita out of them to try and use up some of the overabundance of Pama Liqueur I have around.

2 oz. Cabo Wabo Anejo

1.5 oz. Pama pomegranate liqueur

1 oz. fresh lime juice

.75 oz. Gran Gala orange liqueur

.5 oz. spiced simple syrup ('cuz it's what I had in the fridge)

All in all a pretty tasty concoction.  It was a record breaking 70+ degree day here in Philly so a summery drink didn't seem so out of place.

Katie,

What is your take on Pama? It seems like a pomegranate margarita would be better served by juice rather than liquer. I've never tried the liquer so I'm curious to know how it mixes. I've seen it behind some neighborhood bars but the bartenders don't seem to go to it often.

Tom

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I did consider tweaking the vermouth preportion as well, I'll give it a go before the bottle is empty (soon ;-)

If you like Negronis, try a Bijou (equal parts gin, red vermouth, chartreuse, dash orange bitters). It tastes very little like a Negroni and is not at all bitter, but it has the same rich quality to it. Or, feel free to adjust the ratio for a drier drink.

-Andy

Andy,

I've recently taken to the Bijou, but I've been making it

2 oz gin

1/2 oz chartreuse

1/2 oz red vermouth

orange bitters.

I'm thinking of adding a bit more chartreuse as I think that ingredient makes the drink. Now I'm curious as to how your version and mine compare. I really enjoy the recipe above.

Tom

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Tonight I cleaned out my fridge.  Never a pretty sight.  I did find a couple of limes in the crisper drawer that needed to get used or tossed, so I chose to make a Pomegranate margarita out of them to try and use up some of the overabundance of Pama Liqueur I have around.

2 oz. Cabo Wabo Anejo

1.5 oz. Pama pomegranate liqueur

1 oz. fresh lime juice

.75 oz. Gran Gala orange liqueur

.5 oz. spiced simple syrup ('cuz it's what I had in the fridge)

All in all a pretty tasty concoction.  It was a record breaking 70+ degree day here in Philly so a summery drink didn't seem so out of place.

Katie,

What is your take on Pama? It seems like a pomegranate margarita would be better served by juice rather than liquer. I've never tried the liquer so I'm curious to know how it mixes. I've seen it behind some neighborhood bars but the bartenders don't seem to go to it often.

Tom

Tom:

I generally prefer POM pomegranate juice to Pama liqueur, but I have several sample bottles of Pama laying about so it seemed a good way to use some up.

In general, I think Pama tastes more like a splash of cranberry juice than like pomegranate and that a splash of real pom juice is way more cost effective and tasty in a cocktail than the Pama. I don't *hate* the Pama. I just don't get it. It seems too expensive for real utility behind a commercial bar. :shrug:

Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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I did consider tweaking the vermouth preportion as well, I'll give it a go before the bottle is empty (soon ;-)

If you like Negronis, try a Bijou (equal parts gin, red vermouth, chartreuse, dash orange bitters). It tastes very little like a Negroni and is not at all bitter, but it has the same rich quality to it. Or, feel free to adjust the ratio for a drier drink.

-Andy

Andy,

I've recently taken to the Bijou, but I've been making it

2 oz gin

1/2 oz chartreuse

1/2 oz red vermouth

orange bitters.

I'm thinking of adding a bit more chartreuse as I think that ingredient makes the drink. Now I'm curious as to how your version and mine compare. I really enjoy the recipe above.

Tom

I definitely agree about Chartreuse making the drink, the Bijou is, in my opinion, the best showcase for Chartreuse as a cocktail ingredient. Some people may shy from the powerful herbal-ness, but adventuresome palates will be rewarded!

I will in turn try the dryer recipe you listed and we can compare notes. As currently mixed I can only handle a Bijou when I really want something rich (though it still functions well as an aperitif).

-Andy

Andy Arrington

Journeyman Drinksmith

Twitter--@LoneStarBarman

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.....I have several sample bottles of Pama laying about so it seemed a good way to use some up......

Sample bottles? I want your job. :wink:

You want my old job anyway. :smile:

A lot of the liquor salespeople know that I like to play at home and are happy to provide them with end-result drink recipes for press releases and brand literature. It's a win-win for both of us.

I'm working on finding a new job that hooks me back up. :biggrin:

Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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That description of a Bijou as the best showcase for green Chartreuse perked my ears up, but the only vermouth I have in the house is Noilly Prat dry -- so I tried it with that, and haven't got any complaints. This is a great Chartreuse drink. The Chartreuse does seem to drown out the orange bitters, and I'm not certain I'd notice the difference in a side by side test -- it's three in the afternoon, I'm not going to go find out -- but that's okay too.

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That description of a Bijou as the best showcase for green Chartreuse perked my ears up, but the only vermouth I have in the house is Noilly Prat dry -- so I tried it with that, and haven't got any complaints.  This is a great Chartreuse drink.  The Chartreuse does seem to drown out the orange bitters, and I'm not certain I'd notice the difference in a side by side test -- it's three in the afternoon, I'm not going to go find out -- but that's okay too.

I have forgotten the orange bitters before and noticed a marked difference in taste. Once I dribbled a bit into the drink, the problem was solved. Of course I would recommend a powerfully-flavored orange bitter like Regans' (or perhaps the Angostura when it comes out--any word lately?) to be able to compete with all the other strong flavors going on. Save your Bitter Truth or whatever for Martinis.

-Andy

Andy Arrington

Journeyman Drinksmith

Twitter--@LoneStarBarman

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Hanging out watching the Colts and Ravens, I decided to make myself an Algonquin.

2 oz rye (WT 101)

1 oz dry vermouth (Vya)

1 oz pineapple juice

Shaken and strained. No garnish.

I have been wanting to try this one for a long time, mainly because of the cool name, its Dry Manhattan roots, and I like pineapple. I have been burning through my rye big time of late, and I have less than a 1/4 bottle each of the WT 101, Jim Beam, and baby Sazerac. No way I was going to use the 18 YO Sazerac in here (sequestered for my Red Hooks :smile:) so with the 25% juice component, I went with the WT 101. It is a lovely, balanced drink, but with so many more cocktails to try, I won't be revisiting it too soon.

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Whole bunch of stuff from the last week or so...

The Brock's Buck, introduced by Jackson, bar manager at Eastern Standard. We first had it at the bar, and also tried it at home (the recipe was published recently in a local magazine).

1 1/2 oz Old Monk Rum (has an interesting, almost butterscotch flavor)

3/4 oz bauchant Napoleon (we made it at home with Mandarine Napoleon)

1/2 oz Heering

1/2 oz lime

This is a really good drink, well balanced and flavorful.

Creole Variation, from cocktaildb.com:

Stir in mixing glass with ice & strain

1 oz rye (Rittenhouse)

1 oz sweet vermouth (Cinzano)

1/4 oz Benedictine

1/4 oz Amer Picon

Also very nice, the bitterness from the Picon and the sweetness from the vermouth and benedictine went great together

Hoskins cocktail, from drinkboy.com:

2 ounces gin (Plymouth)

3/4 ounce Torani Amer (I used Amer Picon)

1/2 ounce maraschino (Luxardo)

1/4 ounce Cointreau (I ran out, so I used Mandarine Napoleon)

1 dash orange bitters

Yet another winner. Nicely bitter.

We also discovered the Cassis de Bordeaux black currant liquor (made by Marie Brizard) at Eastern Standard. This stuff is ridiculously good. They made us a drink using the Cassis, plus some Campari and lime. It sounded like it might be way too sweet, but it was SO tasty.

Finally, a Little Italy (previously documented here)

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Putting the baby Saz through the paces continued tonight after some hiatus, first on the agenda was a de la Louisiane, one of my favorites:

3/4 oz Sazerac 6 yr Rye

3/4 oz Sweet Vermouth (Vya)

3/4 oz Benedictine

3 dashes Peychauds

3 dashes Herbsaint.

Garnish with a twist

This is one of my favorite after-dinner type cocktails, normally made with Wild Turkey rye. After trying this, I firmly believe the WT is a better choice for this drink, as it's stronger flavors can better compete with the Benedictine, and it's a bit drier as well.

Second was the Oriental:

2 oz Sazerac 6 yr

1 oz Sweet Vermouth (Vya -- the last ounce)

1/2 oz Cointreau

1/2 oz Lime (fresh, natch)

Since I like using very small cocktail glasses this made two.

I have never been terribly fond of drinks combining American whiskey (esp rye) and citrus, the tartness of the citrus tends to bring out an odd (to me anyway) funky flavor that isn't terribly pleasant. However, from my first taste of the Sazerac 6 yr Rye, I had theorized that this might be the most citrus-friendly whiskey ever. This drink proved me right. Such a beautiful combination of flavors, and of course the use of Vya certainly can't have hurt. I'd probably up the drink to 3/4 oz of lime next time since it was a little on the sweetish side for me but since it was late in the evening I didn't mind too much. Highly recommended.

-Andy

Andy Arrington

Journeyman Drinksmith

Twitter--@LoneStarBarman

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Tonight I had one I've been meaning to try for over a year now, but I never seemed to have the opportunity and all the ingredients at the same time. It looked rather sweet so I tweaked it slightly before even making the first one, here's what I came up with:

Bistro Sidecar

1.5 oz Brandy (Martell VS)

.5 oz Tuaca

.5 oz Frangelico (DeKuyper Hazelnut)

1 oz lemon juice (fresh)

.5 oz tangerine juice (fresh, it was actually a little under .5 oz, maybe 1/3 or so)

Shake and strain. This made two drinks in the tiny glasses I favor. The recipe originally called for sugar rimmed glasses, but I rarely bother with those at home, preferring to balance the drink in the glass, and as previously noted, I was trying to dry it out anyway. I also lacked roasted hazelnuts and so dispensed with garnish alltogether.

Verdict? Very nice, interesting once-in-a-while variation on the sidecar. I think what I came up with here is balanced enough to please those who are accustomed to 2:1:1 sidecars, it's perhaps a touch sweeter than that. Since I rarely use hazelnut liqueur, I have not yet seen fit to replace the liter of DeKuyper I bought back when I was just getting into this hobby, though I'm sure Frangelico can only improve the drink. The really interesting thing about it is that as made here, the hazelnut liqueur contributes mostly to the aroma and a bit in the finish, though it is almost to the point where unless you know it's in there, you may not be able to put your finger on what exactly it is you are tasting/smelling. Much like the cacao in a Twentieth Century in that regard, and in fact hazelnut liqueurs may be fun to experiment with as replacements in that and similar drinks (Delmarva #2, La Floridita Daiquiri).

All in all, recommended to try for anyone who enjoys Sidecars (and who doesn't?). If you normally make your Sidecars with 2:1 of Cointreau:lemon rather than 1:1 (ie, a sweeter drink), I suggest cutting the amount of bothjuices by half.

-Andy

Andy Arrington

Journeyman Drinksmith

Twitter--@LoneStarBarman

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Putting the baby Saz through the paces continued tonight after some hiatus, first on the agenda was a de la Louisiane, one of my favorites:

3/4 oz Sazerac 6 yr Rye

3/4 oz Sweet Vermouth (Vya)

3/4 oz Benedictine

3 dashes Peychauds

3 dashes Herbsaint.

Garnish with a twist

This is one of my favorite after-dinner type cocktails, normally made with Wild Turkey rye. After trying this, I firmly believe the WT is a better choice for this drink, as it's stronger flavors can better compete with the Benedictine, and it's a bit drier as well.

In this particular mix, I wonder if it's the Benedictine the whiskey is competing with. Vya has such a robust flavor; in my humble opinion, it needs to be measured differently in a cocktail than a lighter-flavored vermouth such as Cinzano or M&R (a characteristic it shares, I feel, with Carpano Antica). I love the Vya and the CarpAnt, but they can take a recipe designed to be made with a more typical vermouth and throw it out of whack.

For my taste, I like the Saz6 in the Louisiane, as well as in a Sazerac, and other New Orleans cocktails. It has a satisfying roundness and light sweetness that I think pairs well with Herbsaint & Peychaud's. That said, I haven't yet tried one with the Wild Turkey; hmm, maybe I have a project for tonight....

Paul Clarke

Seattle

The Cocktail Chronicles

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To my taste, Benedictine was definitely the dominant ingredient, as opposed to what I feel is a better balance with WT101. I suppose it's a nice way to showcase the flavor of Benedictine, but since the first time I tried it was with Wild Turkey rye, I have a very definite perception of what the drink is supposed to be, and Saz6 doesn't deliver that profile. My opinion of the baby saz so far is that it more or less fills in where other ryes like Wild Turkey or Old Overholt fall short. For example, I like it with citrus whereas I don't find the others terribly pleasant with it, but I find it lacking in bite for Manhattans (go-to here is WT), Sazeracs, or Old-Fashioneds (WT or Old Overholt, depending on the mood). In a way I find it to be a relatively bourbon-like rye, not in flavor, but in the way it mixes. Hope that makes some sense. I like it quite a bit and do plan on keeping it around certainly, but it certainly won't supplant Wild Turkey.

Of course in some cases I think that perhaps wether WT or Saz6 works best depends on the other ingredients involved. Take for example the Vieux Carre, one on my short list of favorites (though occasional, the ingredients aren't cheap). I typically make it like this:

1 oz Rye

1 oz Cognac

1 oz Vermouth

1 tsp Benedictine (or half as much, as the mood strikes)

2-3 dashes Peychauds

2-3 dashes Angostura

Build over ice, garnish with twist of lemon.

Now if I was going to use a suave, sweet(ish) rye like Saz6, I might go with a dry(ish), gentle cognac like Hennessey. But with a bigger, bolder rye like WT, I might use something like Martell or Couvorsier to better compete, flavor wise. It's fun to experiment, certainly. And with the Vieux Carre, it always tastes good regardless ;-)

-Andy

Andy Arrington

Journeyman Drinksmith

Twitter--@LoneStarBarman

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I've wanted to try Audrey Saunder's Dreaming Dorini Smoking Martini for a while.

However, I don't have any Islay style Scotch in the house. Strangely, I don't even know anyone into Scotch. It's probably been 20 years since I even tasted Laphroig.

So, I went to one of my favorite Liquor Stores and asked about a reasonable Islay style malt. He went through the usual litany of entry level Single Malts. Ardbeg, Bowmore, etc. Eventually, he came back to Jon, Mark, and Robbo's Smoky Peaty One. A vatted Scotch, it is true; but, dollar for dollar, one of the better deals in Islay style Scotch, he said.

I took his advice and picked up a bottle of the Smoky Peaty One. My is it Smoky and Peaty. Woo! Smoke and peat coming out the wazoo.

Stirred up a Dreaming Dorini Smoking Martini with 1/2 oz of Scotch, 2 oz Rain vodka and a dash of H. Bardouin Pastis.

I dunno, I didn't really like it.

Maybe my tastes have been skewed by all the Savoy Cocktails; but, I kept thinking it would be more interesting with some vermouth in it!

Opinions?

---

Erik Ellestad

If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...

Bernal Heights, SF, CA

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In this particular mix, I wonder if it's the Benedictine the whiskey is competing with. Vya has such a robust flavor; in my humble opinion, it needs to be measured differently in a cocktail than a lighter-flavored vermouth such as Cinzano or M&R (a characteristic it shares, I feel, with Carpano Antica). I love the Vya and the CarpAnt, but they can take a recipe designed to be made with a more typical vermouth and throw it out of whack.

[...]

I haven't tried the Vya Sweet; but, I definitely think their Dry is different enough from traditional French Vermouth that it really needs to be rebalanced in cocktails.

To me it seems like Vya is using a very different grape or style of wine as a base for their Dry Vermouth from most of the French companies.

Not sure I agree about the Carpano Antica. Given that Carpano are said to be the original commercial maker of Italian Vermouth and also claim to be using a recipe based on their original product, it's hard to say what they are making isn't authentic Italian Vermouth.

I won't argue that you may have to adjust recipes created with less flavorful vermouths in mind if you use the Antica. But, you always have to adjust for the spirits and mixers you are using.

---

Erik Ellestad

If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...

Bernal Heights, SF, CA

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I've wanted to try Audrey Saunder's Dreaming Dorini Smoking Martini for a while.

However, I don't have any Islay style Scotch in the house.  Strangely, I don't even know anyone into Scotch.  It's probably been 20 years since I even tasted Laphroig.

So, I went to one of my favorite Liquor Stores and asked about a reasonable Islay style malt.  He went through the usual litany of entry level Single Malts.  Ardbeg, Bowmore, etc.  Eventually, he came back to Jon, Mark, and Robbo's Smoky Peaty One.  A vatted Scotch, it is true; but, dollar for dollar, one of the better deals in Islay style Scotch, he said.

I took his advice and picked up a bottle of the Smoky Peaty One.  My is it Smoky and Peaty.  Woo!  Its got smoke and peat coming out the wazoo.

Stirred up a Dreaming Dorini Smoking Martini with 1/2 oz of Scotch, 2 oz Rain vodka and a dash of H. Bardouin Pastis.

I dunno, I didn't really like it.

Maybe my tastes have been skewed by all the Savoy Cocktails; but, I kept thinking it would be more interesting with some vermouth in it!

Opinions?

Ack! You didn't like it!? This has become one of my favourite cocktails lately, and all the friends I've made it for love it, too.

I will say, though, that you probably have to be inclined toward the smoky, peaty Scotches first. I love my Lagavulin and Laphroaig, and the Dreamy Dorini does a great job of broadening them. For those nights where you want something smoky but aren't looking for the intensity of the Scotch on its own.

Also, I think it's important to have enough pastis in it that you can taste it. As one friend remarked, "Whatever you focus on - the Scotch or the pastis - that's what you taste."

Matthew Kayahara

Kayahara.ca

@mtkayahara

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Ack! You didn't like it!? This has become one of my favourite cocktails lately, and all the friends I've made it for love it, too.

I will say, though, that you probably have to be inclined toward the smoky, peaty Scotches first. I love my Lagavulin and Laphroaig, and the Dreamy Dorini does a great job of broadening them. For those nights where you want something smoky but aren't looking for the intensity of the Scotch on its own.

Also, I think it's important to have enough pastis in it that you can taste it. As one friend remarked, "Whatever you focus on - the Scotch or the pastis - that's what you taste."

I know! Weird, eh? I've been looking forward to trying this cocktail for literally years!

I think maybe I just need to adjust my taste buds to Islay malts.

The Peaty One is a pretty extreme dose of peat and smoke. I couldn't really taste the pastis at all. Guess I should up that a bit.

---

Erik Ellestad

If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...

Bernal Heights, SF, CA

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