Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

Recommended Posts

There doesn't seem to be anything in the threads about spice cookbooks.

I just bought The Book of Spices by Frederic Rosengarten, Jr. Copyright 1969. (He has a nut book, too, different thread.) Fabulous illustrations.

I also have McCormick's Spices of the World Cookbook and The Spice Cookbook by Avanelle Day and Lillie Stuckey.

Anyone have opinions or recommendations?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like Ian Hemphill's book, Spice & Herb Notes, altho' as with all such books I've noticed a few gaps (mostly relating to fairly obscure spices).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Back in the late 60's, when I was first learning to cook, I bought two cookbooks devoted to spices:

The Spice Island Cookbook - http://www.amazon.com/The-Spice-Islands-Cook-Book/dp/0016811828

And The Spice Cookbook (which Lindacakes references) - http://www.amazon.com/The-Spice-Cookbook-Lillie-Stuckey/dp/0872500225

They have both been devoted and valued companions to me, lo these many decades. I can't possibly tell you how frequently I've been working on a dish, thought it needed a little flavor boost, and consulted one of these two books to see which herb or spice they recommended be added.

And, for years, my standard wedding/kitchen shower gift was a basket filled with assorted herbs and spices, and one of these two books.

They still hold an honored spot in my cookbook rack and I still refer to them at least once a month. I've cleaned out my cookbook shelf a time or two through the years and never would consider getting rid of either of them. So I do recommend them.

But I will say that it's obvious now that these two old friends are, like me, I suppose, somewhat dated. Often, as I'm perusing this recipe or that herb/spice description, I run across some bit of information that seems passé.


Edited by Jaymes (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's a brilliant shower gift idea. I trust you won't mind if I borrow it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's a brilliant shower gift idea. I trust you won't mind if I borrow it.

Mind? Why, I'm flattered!

I usually went with the Spice Islands Cookbook for the basket because it's smaller, and looks so pretty with all of the herbs and spices arranged attractively around.

I gave it, not only for wedding/shower gifts, but also to neices, nephews, friends's children, etc., that were headed off to college, or to their first apartment, or something like that.

It always went over really well. For one thing, those herbs and spices are expensive, and can be quite a shock the first time you head to the market to stock up your spice rack. Especially if you're a neophyte at the cooking and seasoning game and have no idea what to buy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd love a good recommendation here too. Has anyone heard of a book that contains recommended measurements for spices? Obviously things vary a lot but it'd be fantastic to have a starting point for recipes with less familiar flavor profiles. Just something like "X is commonly used 2:1 with Y", or "10g of Z per chicken breast". I suspect I'm looking for something that's not entirely possible, but that doesn't mean I can't dream...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just bought this one, it's very good on the spices themselves, I don't know about the recipes yet. Published in 1969, excellent illustrations.

The Book of Spices

Frederick Rosengarten, Jr.

This one is out now, very beautiful and the recipes look good, well-chosen. It comes in for some criticism on Amazon but it doesn't seem as if anyone has actually cooked from it:

The Spice Bible

Jane Lawson

Thanks for the tip on The Spice Cookbook, Jaymes. Looks good, I'm getting one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Similar Content

    • By Chris Hennes
      A few weeks ago I checked out a copy of Madhur Jaffrey's Vegetarian India from the library, and it is well on its way to earning a permanent place in my collection. I've really enjoyed the recipes I've cooked from it so far, and thought I'd share a few of them here. Of course, if anyone else has cooked anything from the book please share your favorites here, too.
       
      To kick things off, something that appears in nearly every meal I've cooked this month... a yogurt dish such as
       
      Simple Seasoned Yogurt, South Indian-Style (p. 324)
       

       
       
    • By CCB
      I used my homemade toffee in a cookie recipe hoping that the toffee will add a crunch to the cookie... it didn't turn out well as the toffee melted and didn't keep its hardened crunch form. How can I prevent my toffee from melting in my cookie recipe?
    • By KennethT
      Is there a discussion in the book about the purpose of adding ascorbic acid?  I just saw the contest #2 in which the recipe called for it.  I'm curious because a woman I know on the internet used to work in a bakery in Vietnam, and said that to get similar results to the banh mi there, you need to add ascorbic acid.  Does it act as a gluten relaxer?  Traditional banh mi have a very tender and crisp crust, and a very light and tender, relatively closed crumb.
    • By Tuber magnatum
      In the post below, there was a link to what looks to be a terrific book on beef cutting,  "The Art of Beef Cutting: A Meat Professional's Guide to Butchering and Merchandising".

      Reading some of the reviews on Amazon, I came across this video which I thought extremely educational, particularly seeing as I just bought a mixed 1/4 Wagyu carcass and wanted to learn more about the cuts I received , and I thought others might be interested.  Its long, but I found it much easier to understand than just looking at photos. Also referenced was the free pdf/webpage CFIA MEAT CUTS MANUAL.
       
       
       
       
    • By quiet1
      We have a local Italian bakery my mom loves, but they are very expensive and hard for her to get to. She also really likes cookbooks (she reads them even if she never cooks from them  ) so I was thinking for her birthday I could get her a cookbook that has similar cookies and cakes, and offer to make a few things for her on request also.
       
      I'll obviously look myself, but eGullet is always well informed about the quality of cookbooks so I wanted to know if anyone has any recommendations. The thing about the Italian bakery is that the stuff they make seems to me to be not as sweet as classic American recipes, and often have more complex flavors and also are usually on the light end for whatever the item is. (Like even something that's intended to be dense doesn't have a very heavy sensation in the mouth.)
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×