Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

Erik Shear

Cooking with "Modernist Cuisine at Home" (Part 2)

Recommended Posts

attachicon.gifCrab-eggs-benedict.jpg

I will tell you a great winner is Instant Sous Vide Hollandaise, I just used my last pouch this past weekend. The sauce was 2 months old.

At what stage did you store it? I am presuming frozen?

PK

PK....

I completely made the sauce and then portioned it into smaller bags and sealed and froze.

Here is the Crab eggs benedict it was used on.

Cheers...

Todd in Chicago

So you made the sauce including the foaming in teh iSi? or up to that point and then froze?

Did you iSi it after you defrosted or just warm and put into the eggs?

thanks

Rotuts....at first I thought you were just referring to some yummy tasting food....but now I think otherwise! LOL! My wife picked up on it right away...she's a keeper that one! ;-)

JMolinari....

Oops...yeah...forgot about that. Made it up to the point BEFORE putting in siphon, and didn't bother using the siphon....just used as good ol' hollandaise sauce. I love having this stuff in the freezer as it tends to save a lot of trouble unless you happen to have all the ingredients in your fridge already.

I think my inventory in my freezer shows one left, so I'll need to make another batch.

Cheers...

Todd in Chicago

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ElsieD   

I would like to make the Ultrafrothy Milk Shake on page 89. The recipe states to "To avoid any unpleasant flavor, use only high-quality, DEODERIZED whey protein isolate" . I have never heard of deoderized whey protein isolate, but I can say that I have had some which left an unpleasant aftertaste which is what I'm guessing they are referring to here. Does anyone know of a brand name that I could look for? Or do I just go to my local health food store and ask for this product? And if I do, will the product state that it has been deoderized (whatever that means)?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bojana   

Made spicy chilli oil, then used that to make mayonnaise. It is divine, hot and throat warming, with a hint of star anis and cinnamon.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Part of my disappointment is that I don't have the tools for many of the recipes. I'd love to make the caramelized carrot soup (pp 178-179), but I don't have a blender or a (working) pressure cooker -- part of my love/hate relationship with Cuisinart who don't sell replacement parts. Can the soup be made without the pressure cooking step?

I also don't have a digital scale, pacojet, blowtorch, combi oven, microplane, microwave, nor sous vide setup.

You have to have the pressure cooker to achieve a higher temperature for the caramelization. The PC is a worthwhile purchase.

Digital scales are cheap, but you can use cups/tbsp/etc.

I wing the SV setup at this point by using digital probes. Pacojets aren't for the home cook.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Baselerd   

There's really no reason not to have a microplane.

They can be purchased for under $10 and have countless applications. I suppose its one of those things that you don't know you need, but once you have it you can't imagine living without it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Part of my disappointment is that I don't have the tools for many of the recipes. I'd love to make the caramelized carrot soup (pp 178-179), but I don't have a blender or a (working) pressure cooker -- part of my love/hate relationship with Cuisinart who don't sell replacement parts. Can the soup be made without the pressure cooking step?

I also don't have a digital scale, pacojet, blowtorch, combi oven, microplane, microwave, nor sous vide setup.

You have to have the pressure cooker to achieve a higher temperature for the caramelization. The PC is a worthwhile purchase.

Digital scales are cheap, but you can use cups/tbsp/etc.

I wing the SV setup at this point by using digital probes. Pacojets aren't for the home cook.

I really would like to have a pressure cooker again. Maybe if there is enough left over from my tax refund.

While I don't have a digital scale, I have a nice analog scale. It's just not very good for micrograms. The smallest division is 5 grams. To make the peanut butter gelato I first weighed out three tablespoons of xanthan gum, then calculated that 0.3 grams was approximately a third of a quarter teaspoon. Fortunately the recipe worked. I've been looking at some digital scales that will measure milligrams. Does anyone have thoughts or recommendations?

I mentioned not having a pacoject only because MC@H devotes a full page to it! Not sure why I never got a microplane. Perhaps because they come in so many shapes and sizes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ozcook   

While I don't have a digital scale, I have a nice analog scale. It's just not very good for micrograms. The smallest division is 5 grams. To make the peanut butter gelato I first weighed out three tablespoons of xanthan gum, then calculated that 0.3 grams was approximately a third of a quarter teaspoon. Fortunately the recipe worked. I've been looking at some digital scales that will measure milligrams. Does anyone have thoughts or recommendations?

I use this one (http://www.amazon.com/American-Weigh-Signature-Series-Digital/dp/B002SC3LLS)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

While I don't have a digital scale, I have a nice analog scale. It's just not very good for micrograms. The smallest division is 5 grams. To make the peanut butter gelato I first weighed out three tablespoons of xanthan gum, then calculated that 0.3 grams was approximately a third of a quarter teaspoon. Fortunately the recipe worked. I've been looking at some digital scales that will measure milligrams. Does anyone have thoughts or recommendations?

I use this one (http://www.amazon.com/American-Weigh-Signature-Series-Digital/dp/B002SC3LLS)

I don't believe that scale would have the precision for MC@H gelato though. I ended up spending several hours last night looking at scales. I found one that would measure 0.01 gram up to a kg. It was about $200 however. And for that I could get a pressure cooker. But it would let me use one scale for all my kitchen needs. I gave up on the idea of mg scales as they are too expensive.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't believe that scale would have the precision for MC@H gelato though.

On what basis do you think that? Drug dealers depend on these scales, I don't see why we shouldn't. I've used one of these for a while now and it seems very accurate, and I don't see why it isn't good for +- 0.02 mg or so.

If you want to cook the modernist items that use mg, you need to spend $9. You do not need to spend $200.

That scale and a cheap one for heavier weighs will get you in easily under $50. They are not too expensive. If you want to go ahead and make your whole process easier, more precise and with less dirtied measuring equipment, you can spend another couple of tens of dollars for an additional scale that handles heavier stuff.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Mjx   

While I don't have a digital scale, I have a nice analog scale. It's just not very good for micrograms. The smallest division is 5 grams. To make the peanut butter gelato I first weighed out three tablespoons of xanthan gum, then calculated that 0.3 grams was approximately a third of a quarter teaspoon. Fortunately the recipe worked. I've been looking at some digital scales that will measure milligrams. Does anyone have thoughts or recommendations?

I use this one (http://www.amazon.com/American-Weigh-Signature-Series-Digital/dp/B002SC3LLS)

I don't believe that scale would have the precision for MC@H gelato though. I ended up spending several hours last night looking at scales. I found one that would measure 0.01 gram up to a kg. It was about $200 however. And for that I could get a pressure cooker. But it would let me use one scale for all my kitchen needs. I gave up on the idea of mg scales as they are too expensive.

I'm looking to get my hands on one of the Jenning models, which are priced very comfortably; definitely not $200! I have one of their models, and it's extremely accurate (I just need another with greater precision, for really small amounts).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have the exact same scale, I use it mostly for measuring meat cure. It works great.

The scale can be calibrated.

Buy a couple 50g or one 100g calibration weight when you buy the scale.

Here's a $21+ mg scale that I'm considering.

http://www.amazon.com/American-Weigh-Gemini-20-Portable-Milligram/dp/B0012TDNAM

~Martin


Edited by DiggingDogFarm (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Scales with that kind of range and resolution are always more expensive. I don't find it a problem to use one scale that measures in milligrams up to 100g for the additives and a separate scale for measuring in 1-gram increments up to 2kg. But then, I don't live in a tiny New York City apartment or anything, so I've got lots of space to store two different scales.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The problem you might find with that one is that the upper 20g limit can be a problem for tare on the holding vessel. Even a very small metal bowl tends to weigh 30-40g. Sure you can use the little plastic ones, but for stuff like (say) liquid soy lecithin, they become disposable since that suff is too hard to get off of plastic. I like to pour in some fat (from the recipe) to help it from sticking. I think a 100g limit makes it much more useful.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I believe that scale comes with a measuring vessel as part of the set-up.

I'll check to make sure.

There are plastic anti-static weighing vessels available to counter the sticking problem often encountered with some materials.

~Martin

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Virbonus   

MCaH gives a table (page 192) that properly indicates medium rare target core 55°C. But then on pg. 198 in the recipe for Steak in a Cooler it talks about cooking the steaks to a medium rare temperature of 52°C, Can anyone explain this discrepancy?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't believe that scale would have the precision for MC@H gelato though.

On what basis do you think that? Drug dealers depend on these scales, I don't see why we shouldn't. I've used one of these for a while now and it seems very accurate, and I don't see why it isn't good for +- 0.02 mg or so.

If you want to cook the modernist items that use mg, you need to spend $9. You do not need to spend $200.

That scale and a cheap one for heavier weighs will get you in easily under $50. They are not too expensive. If you want to go ahead and make your whole process easier, more precise and with less dirtied measuring equipment, you can spend another couple of tens of dollars for an additional scale that handles heavier stuff.

I base my opinion on the manufacturer's literature that the scale has a Linearity of +or- 2d, Repeatability of +or- 2d, and a calibration tolerance of +or- 0.2g.

http://www.awscales.com/portable-precision-scales-1-gram/237-amw-1kg-digital-pocket-scale

...as well as on the many Amazon reviewers who say the scale is inaccurate for small weights.

The MC@H gelato recipe calls for 0.3g xanthan gum.

I have never been a chef or a drug dealer but I used to be a scientist.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
PedroG   

There are as many definitions of "medium rare" as there are authors, and it may also depend on the kind of meat, e.g. I cook beef tenderloin or pork to 52°C and racks of lamb to 55°C.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ozcook   

I haven't read the Amazon reviews of the AWS, but I am guessing it is still more accurate than eyeballing a fraction of a teaspoon.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I believe that scale comes with a measuring vessel as part of the set-up.

I'll check to make sure.

There are plastic anti-static weighing vessels available to counter the sticking problem often encountered with some materials.

~Martin

I save the plastic scoops from my husband's protein powder jars. They seem to be anti-static and are small enough not to use up the weight capacity.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I base my opinion on the manufacturer's literature that the scale has a Linearity of +or- 2d, Repeatability of +or- 2d, and a calibration tolerance of +or- 0.2g.

http://www.awscales.com/portable-precision-scales-1-gram/237-amw-1kg-digital-pocket-scale

...as well as on the many Amazon reviewers who say the scale is inaccurate for small weights.

The MC@H gelato recipe calls for 0.3g xanthan gum.

I have never been a chef or a drug dealer but I used to be a scientist.

Perhaps, but unfortunately you were pointed at the wrong scale, which looks identical. Try

http://www.awscales.com/portable-precision-scales-01-gram/229-amw-100-digital-pocket-scale

Which can be had at amazon for all of $10

http://www.amazon.com/American-Weigh-Signature-AWS-100-Digital/dp/B0012LOQUQ

I use this one almost every day, and it works great. It certainly isn't perfect; the buttons and display are crap, it could be faster reading, it turns off too quickly, etc. But it is very functional.

Just plunk down the $10 and save yourself a lot of trouble.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Virbonus   

This was dealing with the same steak - a NY Strip. I agree there are many definitions of medium rare but 3° C is a fairly large difference. The Steak in a Cooler was offered as an alternative way to skin the same cat and I suspect there is a typo so I'm hoping someone from the MC team will look at it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
nickrey   

A number of us had a discussion about this issue before Douglas Baldwin published his book.

The convention that was agreed upon by that particular discussion group was:

50C/125F rare

55C/130F medium-rare

60C/140F medium

70C/160F and above well-done.

This is what Douglas later used in his excellent paper "Sous vide cooking: A review" that was published in the International Journal of Gastronomy and Food Science (2012), Volume 1, pages 15-30.

The article is available on-line here.

As for other temperatures being used to define levels of doneness, I'd agree with PedroG that everyone has a different definition and 3C is not unusual in terms of differences. The best thing is to work out what you like and use that.


Edited by nickrey (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That one seems better for the purpose. Even so I'd rather have just one scale out on the counter, with that one scale being able to weigh anything I'd reasonably use for cooking. I don't live in a New York apartment but I do live in an apartment, with flour in the bedroom and glassware under the bed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Similar Content

    • By Chris Hennes
      I just got a copy of Grace Young's "Stir-Frying to the Sky's Edge"—I enjoyed cooking from "Breath of a Wok" and wanted to continue on that path. Does anyone else have this book? Have you cooked anything from it?

      Here was dinner tonight:

      Spicy Dry-Fried Beef (p. 70)

      I undercooked the beef just a bit due to a waning propane supply (I use an outdoor propane-powered wok burner), but there's nothing to complain about here. It's a relatively mild dish that lets the flavors of the ingredients (and the wok) speak. Overall I liked it, at will probably make it again (hopefully with a full tank of gas).


    • By eG Forums Host
      Introduction

      Welcome to the index for the Sous Vide: Recipes, Techniques, & Equipment topic, one of the largest and most influential topics on eG Forums. (The topic has been closed to keep the index stable and reliable; you can find another general SV discussion topic here.) This index is intended to help you navigate the thousands of posts and discussions to make this rich resource more useful and accessible.

      In order to understand sous vide cooking, it's best to clear up some misconceptions and explain some basics. Sous vide cooking involves vacuum-sealing food in a plastic bag and cooking it in a water bath at precise temperatures. Though it translates literally as "under vacuum," "Sous vide" is often taken to mean "under pressure," which is a misnomer; not all SV cooking involves food cooked in conditions that exceed atmospheric pressure. (See below.) In addition, calculations for SV cooking involve not only time and temperature but also thickness. Finally, due to the anaerobic conditions inside the bag and the low temperatures used, food safety issues are paramount.

      You can read the basics of SV cooking and equipment here. In the summer of 2005, Nathan Myhrvold (Society member nathanm) posted this informative, "I'm now going to answer my own initial questions" post, which addresses just about everything up to that point. For what came next, read on -- and be sure to order Nathan Myhrvold's highly anticipated Modernist Cuisine book, due in spring 2011.

      As with all indexes of on-going discussions, this one has limitations. We've done our best to create a user-friendly taxonomy emphasizing the categories that have come up repeatedly. In addition, the science, technology, and recipes changed over time, and opinions varied greatly, so be sure to read updated information whenever possible.

      Therefore, we strongly encourage you to keep these issues in mind when reading the topic, and particularly when considering controversial topics related to food safety, doneness, delta T cooking, and so on. Don't read a first post's definitive claim without reading down the topic, where you'll likely find discussion, if not heated debate or refutation, of that claim. Links go to the first post in a series that may be discontinuous, so be sure to scan a bit more to get the full discussion.

      Recipes were chosen based solely on having a clear set of information, not on merit. Indeed, we've included several stated failures for reference. Where possible, recipes include temperature and time in the link label -- but remember that thickness is also a crucial variable in many SV preparations. (See below for more information on thickness.)

      History, Philosophy & Value of SV/LTLT Cooking

      Over the years, we've talked quite a bit about SV as a concept, starting with this discussion about how SV cooking got started. There have also been several people who asked, Why bother with SV in the first place? (See also this discussion.) What with all the electronics and plastic bags, we asked: Does SV food lack passion? Finally, there have been several discussions about the value of SV cooking in other eG Forums topics, such as the future of SV cooking, No More Sous Vide -- PLEASE!, is SV "real cooking," and what's the appeal of SV?

      Those who embrace SV initially seek ideas about the best applications for their new equipment. Discussions have focused on what a first SV meal should be -- see also this discussion -- and on the items for which SV/LTLT cooking is best suited. There's much more along those lines here, here, and here.

      Vacuums and Pressure in Sous Vide Cooking

      As mentioned above, there has been great confusion about vacuums, pressure, and their role SV cooking. Here is a selection of discussion points on the subject, arranged chronologically; please note that later posts in a given discussion may refute earlier ones:

      Do you need a vacuum for SV cooking, and, if so, why? What exactly is a "vacuum"? Click here, here, and ff. Are items in vacuum-sealed bags "under pressure"? Does a vacuum sealer create a vacuum inside the bag? Do you really need a vacuum, or can you use ZipLoc bags? Also see here, here, and here. If "sous vide" means "under pressure," aren't the items in the bag under pressure? There is more along these lines to be found in this discussion.  

      The Charts

      We've collected the most important of many charts in the SV topic here. Standing above the rest are Nathan Myhrvold's charts for cooking time versus thickness and desired core temperature. We worked with him to create these three reformatted protein tables, for beef, fish, and chicken & pork.

      Nathan provides additional information on his charts here. Information on how to read these charts can be found in this post. For an explanation of "rest time" in Nathan's tables, click here.

      Other Society members helped out as well. Douglas Baldwin references his heating time table for different geometric factors (slab/cylinder/sphere) here; the pdf itself can be found here. pounce created a post with all three tables as neatly formatted images. derekslager created two monospace font charts of Nathan's meat table and his fish table.

      Camano Chef created a cumulative chart with information gathered from other sources including Thomas Keller's Ad Hoc. Douglas Baldwin shared this chart devoted to pasteurizing poultry. PedroG detailed heat loss and steady state energy consumption of sous vide cookers in these charts.

      Finally, there is also an eG Forums topic on cooling rates that may be of interest.

      Acknowledgment & Comments

      This index was built by Chris Amirault, Director, eG Forums. It was reviewed by the eGullet Society volunteer team as well as many Society members. Please send questions or comments to Chris via messenger or email.
       
       
    • By Paul Bacino
      Wonder if someone could get me in the ballpark..the amount of Transglutamase...to make scallop noodles..    %  I mean
       
      ill use a food processor..to purée the scallop..  then inject into a water or broth..to cook?
    • By TomRahav
      Hi,
      I've tried to make the spherical mussels recipe from the Modernist Cuisine books and it didn't work as I expected, so I would appreciate any advice that may help here.
      The recipe calls for calcium gluconate which I couldn't get hold of, so I replaced it with calcium lactate gluconate that I had at home. I used the same ration (2.5%)
      When I tried to create the spheres in the sodium alginate bath I encountered two main problems;
      1. instead of spheres the mixture just stayed as uneven shape on the surface. The bath was 1Kg. water with 5gr. sodium alginate and I let it rest in the fridge for 24 hours before using it so I think the problem is not here. However, the mussels jus mixture (100gr. mussels jus, 0.5gr. xanthin gum and and 2.5gr. calcium lactate gluconate) had a lot of air bubbles in it. Can that be the issue?
      2. In the book the spheres seem to be completely transparent whereas my mussels jus mixture was pretty white and opaque. Is it because I replaced calcium gluconate with calcium lactate gluconate? Or maybe it's because the jus itself should be clarified before it is used?
      Thanks in advance for your support,
      Tom.
    • By chriswrightcycles
      Good afternoon everyone!
       
      I currently own a MiniPack MVS31x chamber style vacuum sealer and am wondering if a Polycience vacuum canister will work in my machine? The intended use is for making a larger batch of aerated mousse. 
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×