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Blue Vinney- what do we know of it?

just curious. I'd heard about it ages ago but it came up in a discussion recently and it re-activated my interest. Never had or even seen it, but I've seen accounts of a revival in production.

Can anyone here fill me in?

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Blue Vinney- what do we know of it?

just curious.  I'd heard about it ages ago but it came up in a discussion recently and it re-activated my interest.  Never had or even seen it, but I've seen accounts of a revival in production.

Can anyone here fill me in?

Not always accurate, but here's what wikipedia have to say.

Other sources say similar things.

I haven't tasted Blue Vinney for a large number of years, but my memories of it are good.

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  • 3 weeks later...

From the cheese store near our local farmer's market:

gallery_4006_139_118510.jpg

Whiskey cheddar in the back, Maytag blue and then Sticky Toffee Cheese made from cow's milk and, according to the owner of the shop, a dessert cheese. i was thinking about having it with some figs and coffee of some sort...any other ideas?

Nothing is better than frying in lard.

Nothing.  Do not quote me on this.

 

Linda Ellerbee

Take Big Bites

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  • 3 months later...

Gosh; no posts on the cheese thread since August. Guess nobody is eating cheese anymore; except me that is.

We're doing Thanksgiving a week early for complicated reasons I won't bore you with, but think of us eating the cheeses in the basket below sometime around 1:00PM Eastern time.

gallery_22910_3308_10970.jpg

Anybody feeling adventurous can try to guess what the cheeses are.

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I'm new to this thread and this look pretty tough, but I'll make a first guess at 3 of them. Is the tall one a Chabichou? The shorter round one a camembert. They are probably all french, but the rectangular one kind of looks like a robiola.

Hope you have a nice early thanksgiving.

Mike

The Dairy Show

Special Edition 3-In The Kitchen at Momofuku Milk Bar

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Hi, Dave!

I've gotten so busy that I don't check egullet as much as I used to - so glad I saw your beautiful Tgiving cheese display!

Front 2 have me stumped and I'll be curious to see what they are. Hard cheese wedge has an interesting rind that flummoxes me - texture looks like cantal or laguiole, but I don't think it is one of those. Agree w/mjc about the chabischou and the one next to it looks triple creme-y like chaource. Bleu is to far away to check out, but shape looks like roquefort or bleu d'auvergne, rather than fourme d'ambert.

Will be curious to see the identities....

The high-end cheese biz here in the States is very slow at the moment. Even tho prices on imported cheeses from the EU have fallen due to the dollar strengthening, people are definitely thinking twice before they buy pricey cheese and other wonderful things. I hope that if people eat out less, they still want to splurge at home!

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Well, me, I've got my cheeses lined up for Thanksgiving!

Chevre Noire, Roaring Forties Blue and, from Lazy Lady Farm, Crumb Cake and, in honour of what happened earlier this month, "Barick Obama".

Yes, it's really called that...

Sincerely,

Dante

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Gosh; no posts on the cheese thread since August. Guess nobody is eating cheese anymore; except me that is.

We're doing Thanksgiving a week early for complicated reasons I won't bore you with, but think of us eating the cheeses in the basket below sometime around 1:00PM Eastern time.

gallery_22910_3308_10970.jpg

Anybody feeling adventurous can try to guess what the cheeses are.

Ok here we are. I think the ordinariness of this selection threw people off. There is one one sort of unusual cheese.

Front left is good old Boursin. Did you know that it comes from Haute-Normandy East of Evreux? This is the traditional with garlic & fine herbs. None the worse for being an 'industrial' cheese.

Front right is a Brique de Vache. You can, of course, also buy Briques of goat & sheeps milk as well as cows milk. I think these are modern cheeses as I can't find reference to them in any of my older cheese books. Still I like them for their robust taste.

Center is a Cantal Entre-deux. I think the entre-deux crust threw people off. This is an absolute favorite of mine. Excellent both for eating & cooking as well as being not too expensive.

Back Left is a cheese called Canoe which is new to me. I suspect the name is either new or very local. I certainly haven't seen it before. It is a chevre and the shape is traditional; the taste is of a middling aged chevre.

Back Center is Chaource as was guessed. Another of my favorites. Needs to be aged which is hard to do correctly. Said to have originated in the 12th century.

Finally, Back Right is a Bleu de Pays. I'm sorry that the picture doesn't show enough of it for anyone to possibly guess. Now, I like Bleu de Pays and I like the price at only 7 Euros / Kg, but I can't find any reference to it anywhere. I do have a theory as to what it is. Given where I buy it and its taste I think its a failed Bleu de Causses. The AOC Bleu de Causses is strictly controlled and there are few producers. This Bleu has a very similar taste and is definitely a cows milk cheese. In any case as I say I really like it.

I'm sorry to hear that people are cutting back on their cheese eating. Its one of the pleasures of life and not expensive if done in moderation. I eat cheese nearly every day & $10-15 buys enough to see me through a week if I buy carefully.

mjc good try. Keep it up you were right that they were all French.

Dante - good line up & I'll bite . What kind of cheese is it? Can you eat it now or does it have to wait until January 20th to ripen?

Love to have a taste report!

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Barick Obama - I love it - you'll have to tell us about it!

Chevre Noire is one of my favorite cheeses - it's a Canadian goat cheddar that is aged to an incredibly complex flavor. It is outstanding and worth trying if you can find it.

And everyone knows my love for and connection to Roaring 40s on this thread (disclaimer - I am the US representative for this Australian company). I am mostly just thrilled that we will have plenty of supply for this holiday season and beyond. After disappointing people for several years, the pipelines are full and there she be lots of beautiful nutty blue cheese for anyone who wants it.

Honestly, I am throwing together whatever I've got, which seems to be Roaring, a lovely British farmhouse cheddar from Denhay, taleggio and a beautiful salametto from Fra'Mani - a handmade salami spiced w/smoked paprika. Who needs turkey?

Dave - Boursin....of course that threw us off! I'm with you tho, I still love it!

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As a wedding present, a friend bought us a subscription to Sheridan's Cheese Club, with monthly deliveries of cheese. We've just sampled some of the first batch, which included a totally delicious Langres, a very nice Beaufort, a suitably decadent Explorateur and one cheese that I enjoyed a lot less -- Milleens. I'm a fan of strong and smelly cheeses, but this particular example was just unpleasant to my palate. Perhaps it was past its best (the delivery arrived a little while ago).

In any case, the Langres was probably my favourite, and both it and the Beaufort will be on my shopping list in future.

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  • 1 month later...

What a bluey blue piece of Stilton, Dave!

Still no camera, but here's what I am serving at my New Year's gathering tonite:

Chevre Noir - wonderful goat ched from Canada and I got it at Costco!

Roquefort

La Serena - Spanish sheep's milk, sometimes gets very soft and spoonable, but this

wheel, while delicious, stayed fairly firm

Comte

Cabot cloth-wrap ched - if you see this anywhere, but it. It is a special reserve ched,

aged in a cave in Vt, and really great. It won Best of Show at the American

Cheese Society last year.

Lastly, I am going to make bruschetta w/halloumi - smear the bread w/a little olive paste, lay on the toasty halloumi, top w/roasted tomatos.

Happy New Year to all Cheeseheads!

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What a bluey blue piece of Stilton, Dave!

Still no camera, but here's what I am serving at my New Year's gathering tonite:

Chevre Noir - wonderful goat ched from Canada and I got it at Costco!

Roquefort

La Serena - Spanish sheep's milk, sometimes gets very soft and spoonable, but this

    wheel, while delicious, stayed fairly firm

Comte

Cabot cloth-wrap ched - if you see this anywhere, but it.  It is a special reserve ched,

    aged in a cave in Vt, and really great.  It won Best of Show at the American

    Cheese Society last year.

Lastly, I am going to make bruschetta w/halloumi - smear the bread w/a little olive paste, lay on the toasty halloumi, top w/roasted tomatos.

Happy New Year to all Cheeseheads!

Can I come and look out on the Atlantic with you? Cheese platter between us of course.

I'll even bring the wine.

Edited by Dave Hatfield (log)
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last night was our christmas celebration and included a blue cheese plate with some homemade membrillo and some tiny figs. the blues were Roaring 40's, gorganzola picante, mindoro blue and butler's blacksticks bleu. the mindoro has become my new favorite for it's staying prowess on the palate.

would have posted pictures but i still can't figure out how to resize in a program then upload. :angry:

Edited by suzilightning (log)

Nothing is better than frying in lard.

Nothing.  Do not quote me on this.

 

Linda Ellerbee

Take Big Bites

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last night was our christmas celebration and included a blue cheese plate with some homemade membrillo and some tiny figs.  the blues were Roaring 40's, gorganzola picante, mindoro blue and butler's blacksticks bleu.  the mindoro has become my new favorite for it's staying prowess on the palate.

would have posted pictures but i still can't figure out how to resize in a program then upload. :angry:

Is the Mindoro blue from Australia? I can't quite place it, but remember the name.

Pls tell us how you made the membrillo....from fresh quince?

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Is the Mindoro blue from Australia?  I can't quite place it, but remember the name.

Pls tell us how you made the membrillo....from fresh quince?

no, it's from the center of america. here

is the link for Swiss Valley, the dairy that makes it.

yes, i made the membrillo from fresh quinces i got at a local green market last month.

hey, can i come, too if i bring cheese? i have cousins in melrose and malden and am a lifelong red sox fan... :wink:

Nothing is better than frying in lard.

Nothing.  Do not quote me on this.

 

Linda Ellerbee

Take Big Bites

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Can I come and look out on the Atlantic with you? Cheese platter between us of course.

I'll even bring the wine.

Of course, Dave - don't I remember that you have a Rhode Island connection? Then you will appreciate my sliver of Boston Harbor and the Islands.

Please bring raw milk cheeses with you!

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  • 2 weeks later...
I haven't had anything too exciting lately - maybe a nice sheep's Levezou, but I wanted to share what I think is the most beautiful cheese there is:

gallery_41282_4652_49987.jpg

Is she not the sexiest thing you've ever seen?!  Cabrales!

While I"ll admit she's pretty, she's about the only cheese I just do not like....she can be mean and nasty, like she's got a chip on her shoulder and always has to prove how tough she is. I'll take her nicer cousin Valdeon any day of the week.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I picked up this cheese today at a grocery store called Treasure Island. It's nota cheese shop, but they do have a nice selection of specialty cheeses (from all over the place). Teasure Island is known for carrying many sections of ethnic foods (Indian isle, Asian specialty food isle, etc......).

The reason I purchased this is because I was almost certain that it was a cheese I have bought before (not at treasure island though, rather at a few specialty cheese shops in the Chicago area...i.e. Marcy Cheese in Sams Wine Depot, Whole Foods, and possibly at Pastoral Cheese shop although I am not certain if I have purchased it there before). I like it a lot.

Description: Firm Goats (I THINK) milk cheese, semi mild/medium flavor....to some it might be more mediumish to strong (definitely NOT stinky strong though), but since I love such strong flavored cheeses to my pallet it is more mildish/medium. The cheese has an orange rind that you do not eat.....does anyone know some possibilities for what this cheese is - as in name....The packages were NOT labeled....as they were cut off of a larger rind and portioned down in saran wrap at the store. If my memory serves me correct the price was around $12 or $13 dollars a pound...though that is an approximation.

Any ideas? Name of cheese? Where did it come from (origin)?

THANKS in advance!

Edited by LindsayAnn (log)

"One Hundred Years From Now It Will Not Matter What My Bank Account Was, What Kind of House I lived in, or What Kind of Car I Drove, But the World May Be A Better Place Because I Was Important in the Life of A Child."

LIFES PHILOSOPHY: Love, Live, Laugh

hmmm - as it appears if you are eating good food with the ones you love you will be living life to its fullest, surely laughing and smiling throughout!!!

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Sorry to be unhelpful, but there are a million cheese that could match your description. Do you know the country of origin?

Edited by Batard (log)

"There's nothing like a pork belly to steady the nerves."

Fergus Henderson

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source

Redstone Robust perhaps -- formed in a wheel and finished in a special curing cellar near the Wisconsin River. It's a semi-soft, washed rind goat cheese, hand washed for 60 days to produce a red-orange rind with a creamy white interior and hardy, robust flavor. Very unique.

Melissa Goodman aka "Gifted Gourmet"

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