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eje

Stomping Through the "Savoy" (2007–2008)

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Marny Cocktail

1/3 Grand Marnier. (3/4 oz Grand Marnier)

2/3 Dry Gin. (1 1/2 oz North Shore No. 6)

Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass.

Really pimping the North Shore, lately!

Sorry, I really dig their gin, even though it isn't very widely available.

Anyway, obviously, this cocktail pre-dates the Hitchcock movie of the similar ("Marnie") name by about 35 years. So no connection there.

Not exactly awful, neither is the Marny particularly compelling. That is, unless you like slightly sweet, cognac and orange flavored gin. A dash of bitters or a twist would likely go a long way towards improving it.

The next cocktail is the Martinez. As I understand we are on the cusp of availability of Hayman's Old Tom in California, I'm gonna hang out and wait for it to show up in the shops before moving forward.


---

Erik Ellestad

If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...

Bernal Heights, SF, CA

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Called my local liquor store a couple weeks ago and asked them if they were going to carry the Hayman's Old Tom Gin. Usually, they're on top of this sort of thing, so I was a bit surprised when the response was, "Hayman's? I haven't heard of that." Fortunately, a quick call to the distributor revealed that the gin was already in Southern California and would be shipped North soon.

Stopped by yesterday to pick up a bottle.

Martinez Cocktail

(6 People)

Pour into the shaker 3 glasses of Gin, 3 of French Vermouth, add a dessertspoonful of Orange Bitters and 2 of Curacao or Maraschino. Shake and serve with a cherry and a piece of lemon rind.

I suspect Craddock gets the idiotic idea of using French Vermouth in a Martinez from Robert Vermeire, who espouses this formulation in his book, "Cocktails: How to Mix Them". And I suppose it is perfectly fine drink, though Martinez, it is not.

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Martinez Cocktail

(current Ellestad formulation)

1 1/2 oz Hayman's Old Tom Gin

3/4 oz Carpano Antica Sweet Vermouth

Scant teaspoon Luxardo Maraschino

Dash Angostura Orange Bitters

Dash Angostura Bitters

Stir with ice to chill and strain into a cocktail glass. Squeeze lemon peel over glass. Add a (preferably luxardo to toschi) cherry if you so desire.

If you're using a higher proof gin, you might want to up the amount of vermouth, but I find with Plymouth, or now Hayman's, 2-1 is a good ratio. I also like to add a dash of angostura, as I find it tames some of the tropical marshmallow candy notes that show up when Carpano Antica is in close proximity to Luxardo Maraschino. As they say, your mileage may vary.


---

Erik Ellestad

If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...

Bernal Heights, SF, CA

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Martini (Dry) Cocktail

1/3 French Vermouth. (3/4 oz Dolin Dry Vermouth)

2/3 Dry Gin. (1 1/2 oz Plymouth Gin)

Shake (stir, please) well and strain into cocktail glass.

I certainly wouldn't ever think, no, not at all, of rinsing the glass with orange bitters and twisting a lemon peel over the glass. That would just be wrong.


---

Erik Ellestad

If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...

Bernal Heights, SF, CA

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Martini (Medium) Cocktail

1/4 French Vermouth. (3/4 oz Dolin Dry Vermouth)

1/4 Italian Vermouth. (3/4 oz Carpano Antica Sweet Vermouth)

1/2 Dry Gin. (1 1/2 oz Broker's Gin)

(Dash Angostura Orange Bitters)

Shake (stir, please) well and strain into cocktail glass. (Lemon Peel.)

I have to admit I've kind of fallen out of love with Broker's Gin.

Initially, it seemed like an OK London Dry Style Gin, but going from the, "do I think to grab the bottle or not," criteria, lately, I have not been grabbing it. Plus, I miss having Tanqueray around for this sort of fifty-fifty Martini.

Also, it seems to be pretty heavily sweetened for a London Dry Gin.


---

Erik Ellestad

If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...

Bernal Heights, SF, CA

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I agree about the Brokers, it's certainly not bad, in fact you could do a whole lot worse when choosing a newer brand of London Dry, but when you compare it to the old soldiers of Tanqueray, Beefeaters, Boodles, or Plymouth, well there's not that compelling of a case to be made for having it around, at leat in my book. I enjoyed the bottle I bought to try, but found it unremarkable on the whole. In fact I think if I were to only have 4 dry gins on hand it would be the 4 mentioned above, with Junipero being a fifth. No other dry gin has really cought my fancy in a meaningful enough way to keep it on hand regularly. I guess there's a reason those are the old-time brands.


Andy Arrington

Journeyman Drinksmith

Twitter--@LoneStarBarman

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Martini (Sweet) Cocktail

1/3 Italian Vermouth. (3/4 oz Carpano Antica)

2/3 London Gin. (1 1/2 oz Junipero Gin)

(Dash Angostura Orange Bitters)

Shake (stir, please) well and strain into cocktail glass. (Lemon Twist.)

It's funny, when you get to cocktails as iconic as the Martini, it really is kind of hard to think of anything new to say.

David Wondrich has tackled it exhaustively in "Imbibe!" (PS. Hardcover currently on sale at Powell's Books!). There are numerous whole books on the subject from Authors as diverse as Gary Regan and Barnaby Conrad, III.

What else is there to say about drinks this which are this ubiquitous?

We'll probably never know who created it and where. The first version was likely one with Sweet Vermouth and Old-Tom Gin. Personally, I don't think the bitters are optional in a Martini. Without them, it is, apparently, a Lone Tree.

Maybe you've been putting off a Martinez or Martini with Sweet Vermouth?

You know, it was funny, when I was on the Manhattan, I told my Mom about it and her comment was, "Oh, I don't like cocktails which are that sweet." This from a woman who drinks Peppermint Patties!

Really, this isn't that sweet a drink, despite the fact that it contains "Sweet" vermouth. Buy yourself a fresh bottle of Sweet Vermouth, a decent gin, don't skip the bitters, and give it a try. You might be pleasantly surprised.


---

Erik Ellestad

If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...

Bernal Heights, SF, CA

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Agree completely that the "sweet" Martini is a sublime drink, I especially like the Hearst variation from Esquire Drinks, made as above but including a dash of both orange and Angostura bitter. Hard to beat, really.


Andy Arrington

Journeyman Drinksmith

Twitter--@LoneStarBarman

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Martini (Special) Cocktail

(6 People)

4 Glasses of Gin. (2 oz Gin)

1 1/2 Glasses Italian Vermouth. (3/4 oz Italian Vermouth)

1/3 Glass Orange-flower water. (1/6 oz Orange-Flower Water)

Before shaking, add a dash of Absinthe and one or two dashes Angostura Bitters.

Another of those annoying recipes that includes ingredients in the instructions. For one person, I made it so:

Martini (Special) Cocktail, revised

1 1/2 oz Hayman's Old Tom Gin

3/4 oz Carpano Antica Vermouth

2 drops Orange Flower Water

Bare Dash Verte de Fougerolles Absinthe Verte

Dash Angostura Bitters

Stir with ice, strain into a cocktail glass. Twist Lemon Peel over glass and discard.

First, the Orange Flower Water made me think of the botanical intensity of the Old Tom.

However, the amount of Orange Flower Water seemed awfully generous. Working out in the single serving drink math to 1/6 of an ounce for the single cocktail. 2 drops really was plenty, lending a dry perfumey finish to the drink.

All in all, a pretty interesting Martini/Martinez variation.


---

Erik Ellestad

If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...

Bernal Heights, SF, CA

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Called my local liquor store a couple weeks ago and asked them if they were going to carry the Hayman's Old Tom Gin.  Usually, they're on top of this sort of thing, so I was a bit surprised when the response was, "Hayman's?  I haven't heard of that."  Fortunately, a quick call to the distributor revealed that the gin was already in Southern California and would be shipped North soon.

Stopped by yesterday to pick up a bottle.

Martinez Cocktail

(6 People)

Pour into the shaker 3 glasses of Gin, 3 of French Vermouth, add a dessertspoonful of Orange Bitters and 2 of Curacao or Maraschino.  Shake and serve with a cherry and a piece of lemon rind.

I suspect Craddock gets the idiotic idea of using French Vermouth in a Martinez from Robert Vermeire, who espouses this formulation in his book, "Cocktails: How to Mix Them".  And I suppose it is perfectly fine drink, though Martinez, it is not.

gallery_27569_3038_19091.jpg

Martinez Cocktail

(current Ellestad formulation)

1 1/2 oz Hayman's Old Tom Gin

3/4 oz Carpano Antica Sweet Vermouth

Scant teaspoon Luxardo Maraschino

Dash Angostura Orange Bitters

Dash Angostura Bitters

Stir with ice to chill and strain into a cocktail glass.  Squeeze lemon peel over glass.  Add a (preferably luxardo to toschi) cherry if you so desire.

If you're using a higher proof gin, you might want to up the amount of vermouth, but I find with Plymouth, or now Hayman's, 2-1 is a good ratio.  I also like to add a dash of angostura, as I find it tames some of the tropical marshmallow candy notes that show up when Carpano Antica is in close proximity to Luxardo Maraschino.  As they say, your mileage may vary.

Our house version does go with equal portions of the Hayman's and Dolin Rouge (though Noilly Red is ok too), teaspoon Maraska Maraschino and two dashes orange bitters. As much as I adore the Antica, it doesn't balance well for me in this drink.

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The Marvel Cocktail

3/4 Jamaica Rum. (1 1/2 oz Coruba Rum)

1/8 Sirop-de-citron. (1/4 oz Monin Lemon Syrup)

1/8 Grenadine. (1/4 oz Homemade Grenadine)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

Previously I have made these sorts of Grenadine and Rum drinks with Appleton V/X.

I have to admit, trying the Marvel with the Coruba Rum it makes a lot more sense.

It's just a lot more funky and flavorful rum for this application than the Appleton.

I'm gonna have to go back and try the Chinese again.


Edited by eje (log)

---

Erik Ellestad

If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...

Bernal Heights, SF, CA

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Our house version does go with equal portions of the Hayman's and Dolin Rouge (though Noilly Red is ok too), teaspoon Maraska Maraschino and two dashes orange bitters.  As much as I adore the Antica, it doesn't balance well for me in this drink.

I suppose I should have noted that Jerry Thomas' Martinez, like his Manhattan, is a "reverse" cocktail. Here it is from Darcy O'Neil's Art of Drink archive of the book:

Martinez Cocktail.

(Use small bar-glass.)

Take 1 dash of Boker's bitters.

2 dashes of Maraschino.

1 pony of Old Tom gin. (1 oz)

1 wine-glass of Vermouth. (2 oz)

2 small lumps of ice.

Shake up thoroughly, and strain into a large cocktail

glass. Put a quarter of a slice of lemon in the glass, and serve. If the guest prefers it very sweet, add two dashes of gum syrup.


---

Erik Ellestad

If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...

Bernal Heights, SF, CA

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... Tanqueray, Beefeaters, Boodles, or Plymouth ... if I were to only have 4 dry gins on hand it would be the 4 mentioned above ...

Only 4 dry gins, the horror!

Sorry, I've been meaning to follow up on this for a while, but just now got around to it. I was wondering, Andy, if you could elaborate, with respect to Beefeater -- what about it do you find indispensable, especially given the company? What kind of drinks do you prefer it in? I would have put it, with Broker's, in the good-but-not-indispensable category, but I haven't made a serious study of it.


Edited by David Santucci (log)

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... Tanqueray, Beefeaters, Boodles, or Plymouth ... if I were to only have 4 dry gins on hand it would be the 4 mentioned above ...

Only 4 dry gins, the horror!

Sorry, I've been meaning to follow up on this for a while, but just now got around to it. I was wondering, Andy, if you could elaborate, with respect to Beefeater -- what about it do you find indispensable, especially given the company? What kind of drinks do you prefer it in? I would have put it, with Broker's, in the good-but-not-indispensable category, but I haven't made a serious study of it.

I feel like Beefeater's is the best choice for most cocktails that contain lime and/or absinthe or it's analogues. It has more of an 'all-purpose' balance imo, like Plymouth but with more spine, and is cheaper to boot (Plymouth is getting expensive :sad: ). There are times when Tanqueray and Boodles have too heavy of a juniper character, Tanqueray is too sweet (maybe rich is a better word), Boodles too floral, Plymouth too soft. It's these times when I reach for the Beefeaters. On top of all that I just really dig the profile and have a soft spot for it since it's what my dad used to drink when he wanted to spoil himself a bit (moving up from the Gordons!).

Now of course this is all just my opinion, and I'm more than open to discussion on the matter. I don't know if I would say I find Beefeater's indespensable, I just really dig it and like to use it. For that matter I'm not sure I would go so far as to say that I think even mighty Tanqueray is indespensable.

I once read an article where Dr. Cocktail himself recommended that one keep on hand 3 styles of gin: sweet and heavy of juniper (Tanqueray), dry and heavy of juniper (Boodles), and dry and light of Juniper (here we differ, he said Sapphire and I like Plymouth--less light). I think Beefeater's represents a good compromise between all these styles, and is thus a good one to have around. Now if pressed to go down to only 3 choices, it would get the axe I think (depends on my mood right then) but honestly if I could have only 5, I'm not sure what would be the 5th one. This week probably Junipero but who knows, maybe Hendricks next week.

What would your choice for 4 gins that you must have on hand?

-Andy

Edit: continuity


Edited by thirtyoneknots (log)

Andy Arrington

Journeyman Drinksmith

Twitter--@LoneStarBarman

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Fantasio Cocktail (No. 1)

[...]

Gin and Brandy isn't one of those things that really pops into my head as a great combination, so I thought about this one for a while, comparing the gins I had in the house.  Eventually, I decided to go with a Jonge Genever.  It seemed like the slight maltiness would complement the brandy well.

[...]

Maybe I'm on crack, but this isn't half bad.  Sort of a more complex Stinger.  The cherry is a nice touch and I like the flavors it brings towards the end of the cocktail after soaking in the booze.

[...]

Oh, wacky! I just looked through my notes from the copy of Harry McElhone's "Barflies and Cocktails" that I got at Tales this year.

I'm not the only one on crack!

Fantasio Cocktail. 

1/3 Hollands Gin;

1/3 Brandy;

1/6 White Mint;

1/6 Maraschino.

Still too much Mint and Maraschino, but really bizarre that he used Hollands Gin for his version of this cocktail.


Edited by eje (log)

---

Erik Ellestad

If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...

Bernal Heights, SF, CA

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[...]

What would your choice for 4 gins that you must have on hand?

-Andy

I pretty much agree with Andy.

I think Beefeater is an all around very good, high proof, reasonably priced gin. It does especially shine in cocktails with dry vermouth and absinthe.

If I had to choose 4 dry gins to have around, I'd probably pick Junipero, Tanqueray, Beefeater, and Plymouth. Well, plus an Oude-style Genever.


---

Erik Ellestad

If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...

Bernal Heights, SF, CA

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...

If I had to choose 4 dry gins to have around, I'd probably pick Junipero, Tanqueray, Beefeater, and Plymouth...

I'm with you there; I only excluded Junipero based on the price, which is a tad high when you consider that all the others mentioned can be had for under $25/750 and all but the Plymouth can be had for under $20/750. Around here Junipero pushes $30 for the same amount. Not that I'm going to stop buying it or anything... :cool:

-Andy


Andy Arrington

Journeyman Drinksmith

Twitter--@LoneStarBarman

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Mary Pickford Cocktail

1/2 Bacardi Rum. (1 oz Montecristo White Rum)

1/2 Pineapple Juice. (1 oz Knudsen Pineapple)

1 Teaspoonful Grenadine. (1 barspoon Homemade Grenadine)

6 Drops Maraschino. (6 drops Luxardo Maraschino Liqueur)

Oddly another Savoy Cocktail which lacks direction. I'm gonna say shake, because it is so much more fun to get that nice little head you get with shaking pineapple juice.

Way back when we talked about the Fairbanks cocktail we talked about the tension in the Fairbanks/Pickford house. Mary Pickford, "America's Sweetheart", enjoyed the odd drink. Douglas Fairbanks did not and did not approve of her drinking.

I don't know who could argue with a fine, light, and enjoyable drink like this. I doubt even Fairbanks would notice it was alcoholic!


---

Erik Ellestad

If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...

Bernal Heights, SF, CA

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...

If I had to choose 4 dry gins to have around, I'd probably pick Junipero, Tanqueray, Beefeater, and Plymouth...

I'm with you there; I only excluded Junipero based on the price, which is a tad high when you consider that all the others mentioned can be had for under $25/750 and all but the Plymouth can be had for under $20/750. Around here Junipero pushes $30 for the same amount. Not that I'm going to stop buying it or anything... :cool:

-Andy

No Hendricks?

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Maurice Cocktail

1 Dash Absinthe. (Verte de Fougerolles)

The Juice of 1/4 Orange. (1/4 smallish valencia orange squeezed into tin)

1/4 Italian Vermouth. (1/2 oz Carpano Antica)

1/4 French Vermouth. (1/2 oz Martini & Rossi Bianco)

1/2 Dry Gin. (1 oz Aviation Gin)

Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass.

An interesting relative of the Monkey Gland and Bronx.

I'd finished off the last of my current bottle of Dry Vermouth and had an open bottle of the M&R Bianco. Thought it might lend some interest to this cocktail. Indeed, it does! Also thought the Aviation Gin, with it's lavender, might mix well with the sort of culinary herb flavors I get from the M&R Bianco. Not traditional, but tasty with nice clean flavors.


Edited by eje (log)

---

Erik Ellestad

If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...

Bernal Heights, SF, CA

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...

If I had to choose 4 dry gins to have around, I'd probably pick Junipero, Tanqueray, Beefeater, and Plymouth...

I'm with you there; I only excluded Junipero based on the price, which is a tad high when you consider that all the others mentioned can be had for under $25/750 and all but the Plymouth can be had for under $20/750. Around here Junipero pushes $30 for the same amount. Not that I'm going to stop buying it or anything... :cool:

-Andy

No Hendricks?

I like Hendricks, and I use it a lot at work because it's so approachable for the vodka drinking crowd, but when I'm drinking at home I want a more traditional profile. Also, it's freaking pricey...if I have to pick just one $30 gin, and I sort of do, it's definitely Junipero over Hendricks. There's nothing wrong with it at all though, aside perhaps from the price (and the extremely bartender-unfriendly bottle shape).


Andy Arrington

Journeyman Drinksmith

Twitter--@LoneStarBarman

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I'd finished off my last bottle of Dry Vermouth and had an open bottle of the M&R Bianco.  Thought it might lend some interest to this cocktail.  Indeed, it does!  Also thought the Aviation Gin, with it's lavender, might mix well with the sort of culinary herb flavors I get from the M&R Bianco.  Not traditional, but tasty with nice clean flavors.

culinary herb flavors is a perfect description of that vermouth! i haven't heard of any one using that stuff in quite a while... do you think it can taste good contrasted with genever?


abstract expressionist beverage compounder

creator of acquired tastes

bostonapothecary.com

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...

If I had to choose 4 dry gins to have around, I'd probably pick Junipero, Tanqueray, Beefeater, and Plymouth...

I'm with you there; I only excluded Junipero based on the price, which is a tad high when you consider that all the others mentioned can be had for under $25/750 and all but the Plymouth can be had for under $20/750. Around here Junipero pushes $30 for the same amount. Not that I'm going to stop buying it or anything... :cool:

-Andy

No Hendricks?

I like Hendricks, and I use it a lot at work because it's so approachable for the vodka drinking crowd, but when I'm drinking at home I want a more traditional profile. Also, it's freaking pricey...if I have to pick just one $30 gin, and I sort of do, it's definitely Junipero over Hendricks. There's nothing wrong with it at all though, aside perhaps from the price (and the extremely bartender-unfriendly bottle shape).

I tend to feel that the Hendricks / Citadelles / Magellans / Millers / Quintessentials of the world are so far afield of what a traditional London Dry is, that for cocktailian purposes when using one of these or another floral-oriented gin, one almost has to design a drink around the specific flavour profile of the gin he/she happens to be using. I simply don't find much use for them in classic cocktails; sure, sometimes they'll work well, but just as often they'll clash. I think this must be why Andy identifies the Junipero as the singular $30+ bottling that he likes to stock, seeing as it's essentially a big-boned, spice-laden London Dry.

That said, I still own all the aforementioned bottles -- I find their iconoclastic nature as enjoyable sipped neat as I find it maddening in cocktails.

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culinary herb flavors is a perfect description of that vermouth! i haven't heard of any one using that stuff in quite a while... do you think it can taste good contrasted with genever?

Huh, wouldn't have thought of it, but only one way to find out!

Had an interesting experimental drink last night at NOPA with the Bols Genever and a stone fruit shrub. Quite tasty and nicely refreshing.


---

Erik Ellestad

If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...

Bernal Heights, SF, CA

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So the Savoy cocktail book gives the Mayfair Cocktail as:

Mayfair Cocktail

1 Dash Clove Syrup.

1/4 Apricot Brandy.

1/4 Orange Juice.

1/2 Dry Gin.

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

About the Mayfair, Robert Vermeire sez:

Mayfair Cocktail

¼ gill of Dry Gin;

¼ gill of Orange Juice;

3 or 4 dashes of Apricot Syrup flavored with a little Cloves Syrup.

This cocktail possesses a delicious flavor. I invented it at the Embassy Club in London, 1921. Mayfair is the aristocratic quarter of London, called so because under the reign of Charles II (seventeenth century) they used to hold a yearly fair there during the month of May.

Interesting evolution of the recipe between the source, Vermeire and the Savoy Cocktail Book.

To make both versions, being the incredibly lazy cuss that I am, I added a drop of clove oil to 2 oz of Aviation Gin (trying to finish a bottle) and proceeded as follows.

gallery_27569_3038_42304.jpg

1 oz Clove infused Aviation Gin

1/2 oz Rothman & Winter Orchard Apricot

1/2 oz fresh squeezed orange juice

Shake with ice and strain into a cocktail glass. Squeeze orange peel over glass and drop in.

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1 oz Clove infused Aviation Gin

1 oz fresh squeezed orange juice

1 tsp. apricot syrup*

Shake with ice and strain into a cocktail glass. Squeeze orange peel over glass and drop in.

Huh, they both have their good points.

The first is a bit better balanced, while the pectin of the apricot syrup in the second makes it a bit more interestingly textured drink. Oddly, the second seems far sweeter than the first.

Kind of digging the apricot syrup, though. Seems like a really interesting sweetener with a texture similar to gomme.

*1/2 Cup water

1 Cup Sugar

1/2 Cup sliced dried apricot

Dissolve Sugar and water and add apricot. Cool and strain out apricot pieces.


---

Erik Ellestad

If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...

Bernal Heights, SF, CA

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Melba Cocktail

2 Dashes Grenadine. (2/3 teaspoon Homemade Grenadine)

2 Dashes Absinthe. (2/3 teaspoon Verte de Fougerolles Absinthe)

The Juice of 1/4 Lemon or 1/2 Lime. (Juice 1/2 lime)

1/2 Glass Bacardi Rum. (1 oz Montecristo Silver)

1/2 Glass Swedish Punch. (1 oz Homemade Swedish Punsch)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass. (If desired add a cherry, preferably Luxardo or Toschi.)

I had high hopes for the Melba, but I'm not quite sure it lived up to them.

A very good cocktail, that I could imagine being popular, it just doesn't quite have the magic of the very similar Corpse Reviver No. 2 (with Swedish Punsch).

By pushing the sweet/sour focus out a bit further, it loses the refreshing lightness of the Corpse Reviver. Ends up being a bit heavy.

Still, all in all, a tasty cocktail. One of the few I can think of involving Absinthe and Rum. Definitely some promise there!


---

Erik Ellestad

If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...

Bernal Heights, SF, CA

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