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eje

Stomping Through the "Savoy" (2009–)

211 posts in this topic

While (sort of) on the subject of Judge Jr., does anyone know anything about who this guy was and how he came by so many sketchy drink recipes?

"Judge, Jr." was the nom-de-plume for Norman Anthony, editor in chief of Judge magazine, the leading American humor magazine of the day (and where Harold Ross worked before founding the New Yorker). Since he--whether alone or, as is more likely, with the assistence of his editorial staff, interns, friends and readers--compiled the book here in America during Prohibition, he had to make do with what he could get, both in terms of ingredients and suggestions for mixing them. His first book is, however, the first place the French 75 appears in print, so it's not a total wash.


aka David Wondrich

There are, according to recent statistics, 147 female bartenders in the United States. In the United Kingdom the barmaid is a feature of the wayside inn, and is a young woman of intelligence and rare sagacity. --The Syracuse Standard, 1895

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While (sort of) on the subject of Judge Jr., does anyone know anything about who this guy was and how he came by so many sketchy drink recipes?

"Judge, Jr." was the nom-de-plume for Norman Anthony, editor in chief of Judge magazine, the leading American humor magazine of the day (and where Harold Ross worked before founding the New Yorker). Since he--whether alone or, as is more likely, with the assistence of his editorial staff, interns, friends and readers--compiled the book here in America during Prohibition, he had to make do with what he could get, both in terms of ingredients and suggestions for mixing them. His first book is, however, the first place the French 75 appears in print, so it's not a total wash.

Very interesting info, thanks. I guess it took a bit of gumption to publish something like this in the throes of Prohibition. It gets mentioned a fair bit nowadays considering the typical quality of the recipes but how popular was it in it's day? Was it sort of take what you can get atmosphere in the readership as in the authorship?


Andy Arrington

Journeyman Drinksmith

Twitter--@LoneStarBarman

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I do kind of dread the Judge Jr. drinks.

Almost none of them are any good without serious interpolation. Doesn't help that many of them seem to have gained typos when transcribed for the Savoy Cocktail Book. Many of them do contain the tasty kernel of a drink, however. The Applejack Rabbit for example and maybe even the Oh Henry! above. I don't even mind the Barbary Coast, weird prohibition Mai Tai that it is.

It does seem to indicate, however, that the cocktails folks were drinking in the US during prohibition were seriously not that tasty.


---

Erik Ellestad

If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...

Bernal Heights, SF, CA

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Oh Henry! Cocktail

1/3 Benedictine. (1 oz Benedictine)

1/3 Whisky. (3/4 oz Famous Grouse, 1/4 oz Jon Mark and Robbo Smokey Peaty One)

1/3 Ginger Ale. (1 oz Bundaberg Ginger Beer)

Stir well and serve.

This cocktail comes from Judge Jr.’s Prohibition era tome, “Here’s How.” In that book the recipe is given as: “1 jigger of Benedictine; 1 jigger of Scotch; 2 jiggers of ginger ale,” which seems a bit more sensible. Judge Jr. also notes this cocktail was, “Originated by Henry Oretel and believe us Henry knows his liquids!” I can dig up no information on Mr. Oretel.

While tasty, this is way too sweet for me. I think even with 2 parts ginger beer to 1 part Scotch and Benedictine. If I had to do it over, I would go with: 1/2 oz Benedictine, 1 1/2 oz Scotch. Build over ice and top up with Ginger Beer.

I tried this with your proportions and I'm not so sure. Tried adding a splash more Benedictine - that wasn't it. Tried a bit more ginger beer - not it either. Threw in some Regan's orange bitters - a bit more interesting. From the way different flavors came and went from the forefront, maybe it's just another "twitchy" scotch cocktail to balance.


It's almost never bad to feed someone.

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Old Fashioned Cocktail.

1 Lump Sugar.

2 Dashes Angostura Bitters.

1 Glass Rye or Canadian Club Whisky.

Crush sugar and bitters together, add lump of ice, decorate with twist of lemon peel and slice of orange using medium size glass, and stir well. This Cocktail can be made with Brandy, Gin, Rum, etc., instead of Rye Whisky.

Is there anything really left to say about Old-Fashioneds?

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Well, one thing I have noticed is that graduates of the American Bartending School are often a bit

(youtube link) about which end of the muddler goes into the cocktail and which end they should be holding.

Let’s be clear, in the photo above, grasp the top rounded end.

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The flat end of the muddler goes into the cocktail to crush your sugar, bitters and what have you.

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Also, if you buy a varnished muddler, it’s best to sand the varnish off and soak it in mineral oil. If you don’t, flakes of varnish will eventually end up in the cocktails. Varnish is never an appropriate garnish. Now the above muddler is OK for things like Juleps and Old-Fashioned which are built in normal size glassware. For those drinks which are muddled in pint glasses, and the like, you might want to think of something with a bit more heft.

gallery_27569_3038_12519.jpg

For example you might talk to Chris Gallagher and get yourself one of his extremely attractive PUG! Muddlers. The one above is made from Mexican Rosewood. Also, the slanted top end of pug muddlers makes them nearly impossible to hold the wrong way. Or drop a note to David Nepove, aka Mister Mojito, who also sells quite an assortment of muddlers and other bar equipment.

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Which version did I make this time, with all those options, “Brandy, Gin, Rum, etc.”? Well, I’m supporting the home team, of course!

Genevieve Old-Fashioned.

1 lump Demerara Sugar.

2 dashes Angostura Bitters.

2 oz Anchor Genevieve Genever Style Gin.

In a medium size heavy bottomed glass, with a muddler, crush sugar and bitters together with a splash of water. Add Genevieve and stir to combine. Add ice and stir well. Decorate with twist of lemon peel, a slice of orange, and serve.


Edited by eje (log)

---

Erik Ellestad

If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...

Bernal Heights, SF, CA

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While tasty, this is way too sweet for me. I think even with 2 parts ginger beer to 1 part Scotch and Benedictine. If I had to do it over, I would go with: 1/2 oz Benedictine, 1 1/2 oz Scotch. Build over ice and top up with Ginger Beer.

I tried this with your proportions and I'm not so sure. Tried adding a splash more Benedictine - that wasn't it. Tried a bit more ginger beer - not it either. Threw in some Regan's orange bitters - a bit more interesting. From the way different flavors came and went from the forefront, maybe it's just another "twitchy" scotch cocktail to balance.

While I realize it says 'whisky' not 'whiskey,' (and as much as I love the challenge of making cocktails with Scotch), for some reason I usually make this with bourbon or rye. I find that works quite well.


Mike

"The mixing of whiskey, bitters, and sugar represents a turning point, as decisive for American drinking habits as the discovery of three-point perspective was for Renaissance painting." -- William Grimes

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While I realize it says 'whisky' not 'whiskey,' (and as much as I love the challenge of making cocktails with Scotch), for some reason I usually make this with bourbon or rye.  I find that works quite well.

The Savoy Cocktail Book uses the spelling "whisky" for all types of whisky in all cocktails.

However, in what we suspect is the source for this recipe, Judge Jr.'s prohibition era book, "Here's How!" he specifies Scotch for the OH Henry!.


---

Erik Ellestad

If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...

Bernal Heights, SF, CA

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“Old Pal” Cocktail

1/3 Canadian Club Whisky. (1 oz Sazerac Straight Rye Whiskey)

1/3 French Vermouth. (1 oz Noilly Prat Original Formula Dry)

1/3 Campari. (1 oz Campari)

Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass.

This “Old Pal” comes from the 1922 edition of “Harry’s ABC of Cocktails”. As far as I can tell, it appears to be one of the earliest recipes in print, at least in English, calling for Campari.

It doesn’t quite make sense to me, however, with the French Vermouth and Rye. Really you just end up with very little else balancing out the flavors of the Campari and Rye Whiskey.

By McElhone’s 1927 “Barflies and Cocktails“, the “Old Pal” had disappeared in favor of the Boulevardier*, aka the Bourbon Negroni. A much more sensible beverage, if you ask me.

*If you can’t find the Boulevardier initially, it’s no wonder. Check the “Cocktails Round Town” section at the back of the book. “Now is the time for all good Barflies to come to the aid of the party, since Erskinne Gwynne crashed in with his Boulevardier Cocktail: 1/3 Campari, 1/3 Italian Vermouth, 1/3 Bourbon Whisky.”


---

Erik Ellestad

If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...

Bernal Heights, SF, CA

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Canadian Club is not nearly as assertive as Sazerac Rye.

I'd hazard that the canadian whisky and the vermouth work in concert to dampen the Campari's excesses in the original, rather than compete with it.

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Olivette Cocktail

2 Dashes Syrup. (Scant barspoon Rich Simple Syrup)

2 Dashes Orange Bitters. (Angostura Orange Bitters)

3 Dashes Absinthe. (Verte de Fougerolles)

2/3 Glass Plymouth Gin. (1 1/2 oz Plymouth Gin)

Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass with olive and squeeze lemon peel on top.

More or less just an Improved or Fancy Plymouth Gin Cocktail, this is some pretty serious business. Lesser men need not apply.

If you have an appreciation for slightly adulterated straight spirits, on the other hand, this is not bad at all. Do give it a nice long stir, however, make it small, and drink it while it is very cold.


---

Erik Ellestad

If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...

Bernal Heights, SF, CA

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Canadian Club is not nearly as assertive as Sazerac Rye. 

I'd hazard that the canadian whisky and the vermouth work in concert to dampen the Campari's excesses in the original, rather than compete with it.

As is typical, the original recipe in McElhone calls for Rye, not Canadian Whisky. It was only the editors (or bartenders) of the Savoy who swapped in "Canadian Club".

Whether they made that swap because American Rye Whiskey was unavailable during prohibition, because Canadian Whisky was preferred behind the bar at the Savoy for some reason, or because smoother blended whiskeys were becoming more fashionable at the time, I cannot say.

Folks who have tried vintage samples of Canadian Whisky tell me that the much of the modern stuff is much smoother.

Modern Canadian brands they suggest for "accurate" substitution include the Canadian Club 12 year and Wiser's 18 Year. Unfortunately, neither of these is easily available to me.


Edited by eje (log)

---

Erik Ellestad

If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...

Bernal Heights, SF, CA

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[...]

Modern Canadian brands they suggest for "accurate" substitution include the Canadian Club 12 year and Wiser's 18 Year.  Unfortunately, neither of these is easily available to me.

Oh fine, you've guilted me into violating my self imposed ban on new bottles and I've ordered Wiser's Very Old and Canadian Club 12 from Binny's in Chicago. Plus some North Shore Aquavit and Ransom Old Tom.

Will report back.


---

Erik Ellestad

If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...

Bernal Heights, SF, CA

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I've always found the Old Pal a problematic recipe: I wanted so badly to like it but it never really seemed to work all that well. Last night though I finally was able to drive up to Houston and visit Anvil (which is fabulous beyond my wildest expectations, but more on that later perhaps) and Bobby made my friend an Old Pal, using new N-P and Rittenhouse BIB. It was terriffic, and I think part of what helped was the inspired garnish of a flamed orange zest that had been studded with a clove, lighting the clove and using that as the fire source. The subtle accent really took it to the next level.


Andy Arrington

Journeyman Drinksmith

Twitter--@LoneStarBarman

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Plus some North Shore Aquavit

Will report back.

i'm loving the linie but it would be great to taste an american take on aquavit.

any aquavit cocktails in the savoy?


abstract expressionist beverage compounder

creator of acquired tastes

bostonapothecary.com

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i'm loving the linie but it would be great to taste an american take on aquavit.

any aquavit cocktails in the savoy?

I like Linie a lot, myself, but it may be some sort of genetic predisposition, being Norwegian and all.

As far as American Aquavit goes, I find House Spirits Krogstad to be a bit heavy on the Star Anise for my taste and mixing preferences. But I like all the other North Shore products I've tried, so I'm willing to give it a whirl. Sadly, no Aquavit cocktails in the Savoy.

Really pretty excited about the Ransom Old-Tom, as I've heard very good things about it from friends in the Pacific Northwest.


---

Erik Ellestad

If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...

Bernal Heights, SF, CA

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How the Aquavit from he North Ogdenville distillery?

http://www.hulu.com/watch/73585/the-simpso...avi#x-4,vclip,1

i'm loving the linie but it would be great to taste an american take on aquavit.

any aquavit cocktails in the savoy?

I like Linie a lot, myself, but it may be some sort of genetic predisposition, being Norwegian and all.

As far as American Aquavit goes, I find House Spirits Krogstad to be a bit heavy on the Star Anise for my taste and mixing preferences. But I like all the other North Shore products I've tried, so I'm willing to give it a whirl. Sadly, no Aquavit cocktails in the Savoy.

Really pretty excited about the Ransom Old-Tom, as I've heard very good things about it from friends in the Pacific Northwest.


"Wives and such are constantly filling up any refrigerator they have a

claim on, even its ice compartment, with irrelevant rubbish like

food."" - Kingsley Amis

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Oh fine, you've guilted me into violating my self imposed ban on new bottles [...]

Don't you hate it when that happens? :biggrin:

I can say, having tried an Old Pal with Wiser's Small Batch, that I wasn't that thrilled; I seem to recall thinking it tasted mostly like a glass of cold Campari. Which is fine, if that's what you're looking for, but I can't see it going into regular rotation alongside my usual Campari and sodas or Negronis. That said, maybe I should try it with some American rye and see how that is. I'll be interested to hear your thoughts on the Canadian whiskies, Erik.


Matthew Kayahara

Kayahara.ca

@mtkayahara

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Oh fine, you've guilted me into violating my self imposed ban on new bottles and I've ordered Wiser's Very Old and Canadian Club 12 from Binny's in Chicago.  Plus some North Shore Aquavit and Ransom Old Tom.

Will report back.

Heh, and you've made me want to purchase this:

http://www.goantiques.com/detail,glass-192...an,1659809.html

(though I'd want to do a chemical analysis before trying any, and the bottle is in suspiciously good condition, and customs clearances would be problematic...)

edit: not to mention it's most likely some sort of re-release, given the capping material.


Edited by J_Ozzy (log)

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Olympic Cocktail.

1/3 Orange Juice. (1 oz Fresh Moro Blood Orange Juice)

1/3 Curacao. (1 oz Bols Dry Orange Curacao)

1/3 Brandy. (1 oz Dudognon Cognac)

Shake well and strain into cocktail glass.

A pleasant enough beverage, it was a bit of a waste of this rather nice Cognac. Between the Blood Orange Juice and the Curacao, I could have been using Korbel in this instead of the Dudognon. Cocktails like this are a good reason to keep a couple bottles around.

In any case, the Olympic beats the hell out of a Screwdriver.


---

Erik Ellestad

If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...

Bernal Heights, SF, CA

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One Exciting Night Cocktail.

1 Dash Orange Juice. (1 Dash Blood Orange Juice)

1/3 French Vermouth. (3/4 oz Noilly Original Dry Vermouth)

1/3 Italian Vermouth. (3/4 oz Punt e Mes)

1/3 Plymouth Gin. (3/4 oz Plymouth Gin)

Shake (I stirred) well and strain into Port Wine glass. Squeeze lemon peel on top. Frost edge of glass with castor sugar.

As always, your life will be much easier if you frost the edge of the glass before straining the cocktail into it.

However, faced with mandatory glass frosting in a not very tart cocktail, I opted for the more bitter flavors of Punt e Mes in this Bronx-like Cocktail. This at least provided some interesting contrasts between the bitter and sweet elements of the construction. Fairly enjoyable, but I would leave out the caster sugar, if making it for myself, even if it cut down on the excitement for the evening.


---

Erik Ellestad

If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...

Bernal Heights, SF, CA

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Oom Paul Cocktail.

1 Dash Angostura Bitters.

1/2 Caperitif. (1 oz Dolin Blanc Vermouth)

1/2 Calvados. (1 oz Germain-Robin Apple Brandy)

Shake (I stirred) well and strain into cocktail glass.

I’ve struggled with various substitutions for “Caperitif” over the course of these cocktails, and I don’t know if it’s just that I really like Dolin Blanc, but it was a very interesting foil for the flavors of the Apple Brandy in this relatively simple cocktail.

Intrigued enough with the results, I remade it with Calvados Groult Reserve and enjoyed it even more. I’m not sure if I agree with one friend’s assertion that, “Calvados is always better,” but in this case it was definitely more interesting than the American Apple Brandy.

If you like Apple Brandies as much as I do, this is a great cocktail to become familiar with their character.

Another unusually named cocktail with Caperitif. I should know by now that pretty much any cocktail with some weird ass name and Caperitif is going to have something to do with the Anglo Boer Wars.

From the Wikipedia entry for “Paul Kruger“:

Stephanus Johannes Paulus Kruger (10 October 1825 – 14 July 1904), better known as Paul Kruger and affectionately known as Oom Paul (Afrikaans: “Uncle Paul”) was State President of the South African Republic (Transvaal). He gained international renown as the face of Boer resistance against the British during the South African or Second Boer War (1899-1902).

More information here: “Who Was Paul Kruger


Edited by eje (log)

---

Erik Ellestad

If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...

Bernal Heights, SF, CA

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a very interesting foil

i like the language. elevate by contrast!


abstract expressionist beverage compounder

creator of acquired tastes

bostonapothecary.com

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Another unusually named cocktail with Caperitif.  I should know by now that pretty much any cocktail with some weird ass name and Caperitif is going to have something to do with the Anglo Boer Wars.

Interesting. I would have assumed that "Oom Paul" was a strange misspelling of "oop pah" -- as in "oom pah pah" waltz music played by German/Austrian brass bands.


Samuel Lloyd Kinsey

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Another unusually named cocktail with Caperitif.  I should know by now that pretty much any cocktail with some weird ass name and Caperitif is going to have something to do with the Anglo Boer Wars.

Interesting. I would have assumed that "Oom Paul" was a strange misspelling of "oop pah" -- as in "oom pah pah" waltz music played by German/Austrian brass bands.

My first reaction as well...quite interesting the bit about Kruger.


Andy Arrington

Journeyman Drinksmith

Twitter--@LoneStarBarman

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Opal Cocktail

(6 People)

3 Glasses Gin. (1 1/2 oz Plymouth Gin)

2 Glasses Orange Juice. (1 oz Blood Orange Juice)

1 Glass of Cointreau. (1/2 oz Cointreau)

A little Sugar. (very little caster sugar)

Add a little Orange-flower water. (drop orange flower water)

Shake and serve.

Of course, re-doing this for one by dividing 2 oz Glasses in half and then dividing in half again. Hey, I can enjoy a drink and a half.

The Opal is not entirely unpleasant, though far more ginny and a bit harsher than would be popular in a modern cocktail. I think part of it might be the heat of the Cointreau.

No idea why it is called the Opal, as even with regular orange juice this would bear no resemblance to those gold-green gems.


---

Erik Ellestad

If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...

Bernal Heights, SF, CA

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