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Jeffrey Weiss

New Spanish charcuterie/butchery book Fall 2013

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Hi everyone,

I just had to re-sign up since it's been awhile :hmmm:

I wanted to let you all know the awesome news that I will be releasing a book at the end of the year about my time learning the charcuterie and butchery of Spain.

It's called Charcutería: The Soul of Spain, and will have a foreword by James Beard award-winning chef José Andrés. The book is going to have a bunch of traditional techniques and recipes for Spanish charcuterie and pork butchery, as well as recipes and other little tricks I picked up working with the folks in the Extremaduran countryside.

My photog and I just got back from visiting Spain for the photoshoot and the guys up in Asturias did a little video about it.

Here's the link to the video: http://www.whereisasturias.com/?p=6602

And a link to our FB page (Lots more photos... please like!): https://www.facebook.com/charcuteriaspain?ref=ts&fref=ts

Please feel free to write me if you have any requests or questions for the book--really trying to make something that my fellow meatheads and sausage nerds can get into.

Ciao,

jeff

PS: As a little offering to my hopefully-new eGullet pals here's a sexy photo from the Jamón slicing shoot. Tatoos and meat...

IMG_8571.jpg

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That sounds great! I would ask that the book can be used both by Spaniards and Americans. Meaning that if you have to propose ingredients changes to adapt to what is available in the US or something (which would be understandable in an English book) you also leave the original ingredients or terms so we can use it also in Spain :-)

Sadly there is not a real reference book about the topic in Spanish...

As a general thought, it seems to me that here in Spain we have to wait for foreigners to come and write practical useful cooking books about what we do here. Same as happened with Modernist Cuisine. Though much of that movement originated in Spain, all books published here were huge expensive coffee-table style books focusing mainly on beautiful pictures, restaurant history and "philosophical" concepts instead of practical information to be applied in your cooking. Seems english-speaking people are more practical, e.g. Blumenthal books or Modernist Cuisine...

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That sounds great! I would ask that the book can be used both by Spaniards and Americans. Meaning that if you have to propose ingredients changes to adapt to what is available in the US or something (which would be understandable in an English book) you also leave the original ingredients or terms so we can use it also in Spain :-)

Sadly there is not a real reference book about the topic in Spanish...

As a general thought, it seems to me that here in Spain we have to wait for foreigners to come and write practical useful cooking books about what we do here. Same as happened with Modernist Cuisine. Though much of that movement originated in Spain, all books published here were huge expensive coffee-table style books focusing mainly on beautiful pictures, restaurant history and "philosophical" concepts instead of practical information to be applied in your cooking. Seems english-speaking people are more practical, e.g. Blumenthal books or Modernist Cuisine...

Hola Enrique!

De acuerdo... I have been writing everything so that it applies to both US and international markets, but--and this isn't a bad thing--that meant a chapter on pork butchery following the Spanish method. I learned a lot about this while cooking in Spain--the Spaniards utilize seam butchery but also have some unique cuts that are specifically called for in their charcuterie. By talking about both I'm hoping to kill 2 pigs with 1 stone (pardon the pun, couldn't resist :raz: ) by both introducing the butchery as well as the charcuterie techniques.

Un saludo desde EEUU... jeff

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Fantastic to hear, Jeff. Best of luck and I'll stay tuned in to learn about a drop date for the book. BTW, I agree Spanish cured meat is 'next' so I'm psyched to see your role in this.

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Very happy to hear it! Can you give us a teaser - any beef, or all-pork in your recipe?

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Very happy to hear it! Can you give us a teaser - any beef, or all-pork in your recipe?

The recipe I learned was all pork--but I acknowledge that other recipes call for some or all beef. That seems to be a regional or personal preference.

If you are interested in testing I would love a full-fledged vasco's opinion... :biggrin:

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I would absolutely love to test, but I'm far from a full-fledged vasco. My mom is a first-generation American (maiden name Antxustegi) whose parents came from Andorra and San Sebastian, and I used to cook on the line for Judy Rogers, Wolfgang Puck, and others. Been making charcuterie at home for years, but haven't tried a chistorra yet. Would love to talk more if you're interested and need any help at all!

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I would absolutely love to test, but I'm far from a full-fledged vasco. My mom is a first-generation American (maiden name Antxustegi) whose parents came from Andorra and San Sebastian, and I used to cook on the line for Judy Rogers, Wolfgang Puck, and others. Been making charcuterie at home for years, but haven't tried a chistorra yet. Would love to talk more if you're interested and need any help at all!

Sweet! Hit me with a PM... we can exchange deets.

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Hello all,

Just a note of thanks to the members of the eGullet forum-- I am so grateful for the support you have all given as this little book has come full circle to publication.

We are now under 1 month to the release of Charcutería: The Soul of Spain and I couldn't be more proud. I have a website and some fun photos/videos forthcoming, but please keep the questions and comments rolling in and I'll do my best to answer.

I hope that you all get a chance to check out the book sometime--for more info, see this Amazon link for the book as well as the below video about our time in Asturias

Also, please come visit us sometime at our new restaurant, Jeninni Kitchen + Wine Bar, in Pacific Grove, Ca

All the best and may the chorizo be with you... jeff

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Can't wait to get my copy. I plan to do various sausages in March and hope to find some new recipes in there.

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