• Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

hallph

Meat Cookbook/Reference Book

14 posts in this topic

I'm looking to develop and expand my knowledge of cooking meat.

Different types, different styles of cooking, science behind the methods, meat cuts, and so forth.

Can anyone recommend any reference books or cookbooks that would help me?

I've had a google, and found the following that seem like they might suit:

  • Meat: A Kitchen Education (James Peterson)
  • Ad Hoc at Home (Thomas Keller)
  • The Science of Good Cooking (Though not strictly a meat book)

Any suggestions would be much appreciated, thanks.


Edited by hallph (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow!

There is no comprehensive book that I know of.

You could fill a good sized home library with all the options, and I have. LOL

Can you be more specific?

What are you most interested in?

~Martin


~Martin

Unsupervised rebellious radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, self-reliant homesteader and adventurous cook. Crotchety cantankerous terse curmudgeon, nonconformist, contrarian and natural born skeptic who questions everything!

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it! 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I enjoy Bruce Aidells' work. One of his books - the one I go to most - is Bruce Aidell's and Dennis Kelly's Complete Meat Cookbook http://www.amazon.com/Complete-Meat-Cookbook-Bruce-Aidells/dp/061813512X

What I like about it: the book provides recipes for spice mixes, rubs, and sausage spices; it provides butchering diagrams for various animals; it also provides recipes. There may be other good meat/reference cookbooks out there, but I've been happy with this one.


Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Meat.. A broad subject, I know..

I was looking for a single book that could assist to give me an education in regards to:

  • The various cuts from the animals, and techniques that can be employed in terms of preparation for these (in particular, beef/lamb/goat/pork/rabbit/duck);
  • How to select an appropriate cooking technique based on the cut, along with reasoning why and some science behind the method; and
  • Generally, expand my ideas on what is possible with relatively standard meats - to give me some new thoughts and ideas for cooking as opposed to my currently limited repertoire.

Perhaps there are no great meat cookbooks/reference books that cover these basics? I may need to look into a few separate books, which is fine.

Thanks for the suggestion Smithy, I will look into it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Light on the science, but definitely a comprehensive meat cook book is the River Cottage Meat book. If you want to go into specific, but different methods of live fire meat cookery, I'd recommend Francis Mallmann's Seven Fires. As for game, there are many books out there, but one I particularly enjoy is Andrew Pern's Loose Birds and game.

If your focus really is on the science of meat cookery/differences in cooking methods, I don't think anything out there is as understandable and in-depth as Moderist Cuisine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with Renn, the River Cottage Meat book covers a good range in enough detail to get a good start and with regards to cuts/techniques butter up your butcher!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I enjoy Bruce Aidells' work. One of his books - the one I go to most - is Bruce Aidell's and Dennis Kelly's Complete Meat Cookbook http://www.amazon.com/Complete-Meat-Cookbook-Bruce-Aidells/dp/061813512X

What I like about it: the book provides recipes for spice mixes, rubs, and sausage spices; it provides butchering diagrams for various animals; it also provides recipes. There may be other good meat/reference cookbooks out there, but I've been happy with this one.

Bruce Aidells has a new meat book out. We got it for Christmas but haven't had much time to cook from it -- The Great Meat Cookbook. I loved his old one with Denis Kelly, so I hope this is even better.

1 person likes this

Janet A. Zimmerman, aka "JAZ"
Manager
jzimmerman@eGullet.org
eG Ethics signatory
Author, The Healthy Pressure Cooker Cookbook and All About Cooking for Two

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Cutting up in the Kitchen", is excellent, as already suggested by rotuts.

"The Kitchen Pro Series: Guide to Meat Identification, Fabrication and Utilization" is also very good and so is "The Kitchen Pro Series: Guide to Poultry Identification, Fabrication and Utilization".

There are countless other books that are also great.

HTH

~Martin


~Martin

Unsupervised rebellious radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, self-reliant homesteader and adventurous cook. Crotchety cantankerous terse curmudgeon, nonconformist, contrarian and natural born skeptic who questions everything!

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it! 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This might sound lame, but I learned a lot about cooking meat from watching free PBS shows, particularly Primal Grill (Steve Raichlen) and Mexico One Plate at a Time (Rick Bayless). Both shows have reruns at least recently showing on PBS stations, and also have segments available on YouTube and/or on DVD. Although the Bayless show features Mexican recipes, the techniques on display are equally applicable to dishes from other cultures. Raichlen's show covers recipes from a broad set of cultures but primarily focuses on outside cooking. In both shows, there is discussion of matching the cut to the method.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

the meat buyers handbook published by NAMP is a great reference for cuts and where they're from. Not a cook book at all, but very handy to have. Lobel's also put out a couple really good books on the topic.


"And don't forget music - music in the kitchen is an essential ingredient!"

- Thomas Keller

Diablo Kitchen, my food blog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another vote for The River Cottage Meat book. One of my favourite books, some great recipes but even better essays on various things to do with meat.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the suggestions all, I've placed some orders, will let you know once they arrive!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Similar Content

    • By Mike.jj
      Hello Egullet family.. its good to be back on here, been away for a while, i hope to find some new trending recipes .. and be ready to get some African dish recipes for those who love African Dishes, You can Read and  Download  Mp3 Audios here of some Nigerian dishes, and there are more coming in which i would be placing on here.. Thanks
    • By FrogPrincesse
      I've been eying this book since I heard about its upcoming release. For me, a cocktail book with a French slant is a hugely appealling. I flipped through it at my local bookstore and was compelled to buy it when I saw a recipe calling for Byrrh, along with a few re-interpreted classics. The recipes are not overly complex and generally don't call for esoteric ingredients. If you have Sam Ross' Bartender's Choice app, it's in the same vein but with a definite French (and international) touch, with recipes calling for things like Suze, Armagnac or Japanese whisky.
       
      Measurements are given in milliliters and ounces, and were probably conceived in metric so they can be a bit unusual sometimes, but this is not a big deal at all. Each recipe is provided with a little background about its creation or general concept, which I always find the most interesting part of these types of books.
       
      The first thing I mixed was the Byrrh cocktail of course. It had quite a few other ingredients, but luckily I had everything already on hand.
       
      Handsome Jack (Chris Tanner) with Rittenhouse straight rye, Pierre Ferrand 1840, Aperol, Byrrh, green Chartreuse, maple syrup, Angostura and Peychaud's bitters.
       
      As indicated in the notes, it is slightly on the sweet side but it has a slight bitterness that compensates for that (from the Byrrh and Aperol). The flavor is deep and complex. There is almost like a chestnut note with the maple syrup and cognac, and a nice kick from the rye. A very good fall/winter drink.
       
       

       
      Review of the book on Eater.
       
       
    • By Lisa Shock
      The team over at Modernist Cuisine announced today that their next project will be an in-depth exploration of bread. I personally am very excited about this, I had been hoping their next project would be in the baking and pastry realm. Additionally, Francisco Migoya will be head chef and Peter Reinhart will assignments editor for this project which is expected to be a multi-volume affair.
    • By liuzhou
      Another great article from the great Harold McGee. "The Science of Herbs and Spices" on Lucky Peach.
       
      Fascinating as ever.
       
      Now I just need to find the Chinese for "chitosan".
    • By Secret_Ingredient
      I emailed OXO a while ago, asking if they could design and market a thermocouple based thermometer. I reasoned that with their market penetration, the cost would be in the same range of current thermometers. I never heard back and cannot guess why there was no response.
       
      Most consumer grade digital thermometers use a thermistor. I had one of the first Polder Probe/wire (or cable) thermos and I loved it. It had a cable or wire, shielded in a metal braid. The new ones, use a silicon covering. Most of the reviews say that probe breaks and Polder has addressed that by adding a "handle" (of sorts) to the probe. Reasonable care while inserting and extracting the probe would have been more sensible by the reviewers who broke there devices, but the handle works, too.
       
      Still, this device and as I said above, most all temperature reading devices use a thermistor, or even a bi-metal strip (don't call me a perv!). The thermocouple devices read a much more accurate temperature range. From here on I'm spelling thermocouple as t/c.
       
      The Cook's Country (and under a multitude of other names) commonly shows the Thermapen t/c. At $100 it's pricey for the kitchen, but not for what it is. I imagine there are loads of industrial, scientific, and technical uses for it. There the $100 is worth it. The website: Cooking For Engineers sells the device for a "MERE" $79.  That site reviews a number of thermometers and puts the t/c on top.
       
      So dear reader, I must ask, why have the OXO's and Sur La Tables, Williams-Sonomas, and the like not found a way to place a t/c probe in a thermometer?
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.