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Corned Beef, Sous Vide


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I ended up processing 3 of the bags, as that amount easily fit in my SV 'cooler-cooker' :

cut each piece in 1/2; trimmed off most of the external fat and saved that for 'cracklings' later, 24 hr soak in cold water in refrig w several water changes.

Bagged w granulated garlic and fresh ground B.P. and SV 142.5 for 22 or so hours, just until a convenient time the next day for some smoking.

applewood chips ( home depot ) on the 'rig' in foil no fiddle and faddle just adjusting the air into the foil for lots of smoke and no flame on the webber at a temp of 130. note the old pan as an air-flow regulator to control temp of grill area. temp outside was 52 and front burner only on low. probe along back connected to a transmitter to send the temp to Comfortable Indoor Chair.

Smoking.jpg

smoking in progress

CB Done.jpg

Corned Beef done

CB sliced.jpg

sliced the next day after chilling in refrig over night.

fantastic flavor and smoke. this will be a regular item for me. the green tinge is not really present on the meat.

many thanks for all the help!

N.B. no liquid smoke was used in the prep! I also had 1 Qt of 'jus' from the CB's which I saved. Ill add a little more granulated garlic and black pepper to the CB's at the time of the smoking next time.

Edited by rotuts (log)
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Nice job. Looks like your weber is almost as old as mine. I much be going on 14 years with one set of replacement burners and flavorizer bars.

Same here. A Weber Genesis Silver C. 3 burners. gone through a couple sets of flavorizer bars and a grate but outside of that its all original and also about 15 yrs old

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I had a weber genisis gold with the SS top that lasted 10 years before i upgraded and gave it to my uncle. Great grill, I used it almost daily even in the winter. Only part that ever went on it was the temp gauge. I probably would still be using it had the gauge not went. But I wanted a grill with a searing burner so it was a good excuse to use on the wifey.

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  • 1 year later...

I have a 2.5 lb. brisket I am corning using Michael Ruhlman's recipe in Charcuterie. I want to cook it sous vide but am having trouble ascertaining how long and at what temperature I should be doing this for. I have checked through a number of posts on this forum and the temperatures and times vary wildly. From 132F for 48 hours (but then smoked at 155F to make pastrami which I won't be doing) to 180F for 10 hours and then there are a bunch of in-betweens, such as 149F for 45 which they said turned out dry, and another person who cooked it at 176F for 16 - 18 hours.

What has your experience been? Thank you.

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It has been some time but I know I did a prepackaged brisket from Wegman's at 175°F for 16 hours. Following the advice of member patrice I used only one half the spice package that comes with it. I believe patris and Kerry Beal both had success with this time and temperature. I had wisely followed their lead!

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

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I do SV 60 C for two days for both brisket and top round roast corned beef.

 

Cure/spice rub for a week in the fridge...rinse well then into the SV.

 

For pastrami my order is rub...cold smoke...SV.

 

Top round done this way is really tender and slices thinner than brisket. Less fatty too if t hat is a goal.

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I cured a beef shoulder roast with a dry rub and Readycure (1/6 Prague strength) for two weeks.  There was sugar in the cure, and extra salt from Montreal steak, plus a few other spices.

 

On March 17 I didn't have time to sv, so I had to decide between pressure cooker and a tagine. I put it in the tagine unrinsed with two potatoes, on a steaming rack over water. Lid on, and into a 400 F oven for 2 hours.  Came out really good, all collagen was soft, and the spicy surface well crusted. The potatoes were golden brown, a nice plus. Served with creamed spinach.

 

Leftovers went into corned beef has this morning.

 

Next year I plan to try sous vide haggis on Robbie Burns day (Jan.25). We Scots are always a bit jealous of the Irish on St. Pat's day!

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I do SV 60 C for two days for both brisket and top round roast corned beef.

 

Cure/spice rub for a week in the fridge...rinse well then into the SV.

 

For pastrami my order is rub...cold smoke...SV.

 

Top round done this way is really tender and slices thinner than brisket. Less fatty too if t hat is a goal.

Last year around this time I cured a whole brisket flat cut into 2 pieces.  I also bought a packaged corned beef.  Did one of the pieces that I cured as well as the packaged corned beef on the smoker after the pastrami rub and smoked it tp about 180f then finished them over steam in the oven to 200.  The other piece of home cured brisket was first rubbed then smoked for a couple of hours then into the SV bath following advice I picked up at eG.  My bad, I can 't find my notes but it was cooked for a day or two but was not as tender as the ones done a more traditional way on the smoker and steamed. 

 

I still have a chunk of that one in the freezer and was thinkging of tossing it in the bath at about 60c for a day or so to warm it and maybe tenderize it more

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Thanks to all for responding. Anna, good point about the spices. I will use just half the amount called for. It seems I have two options. One is to cook it for 16 hours at 175 and the other is to cook it at 140 for 48 hours. This question is addressed to those who cooked it at around 140 - what was the body of the meat like? Did it have a cooked to medium look about it? This will be cooked as a corned beef dinner. I do not have access to a smoker or any other type of bbq equipment as I live in a condo and such things are strictly verboten (hangs her head in sorrow).

I will betting this on tomorrow (Friday).

Edited to add when I would be cooking this.

Edited by ElsieD (log)
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Since I have not achieved a sublime SV corned beef/pastrami, what is the textural advantages over more conventional methods? It's going to be red due to the cure either way so I'm assuming there is more textural advantages as well as the obvious advantage of minimal attention during cooking.

Along with my poor attempt at a SV pastrami last year I have a store bought prepared corned beef in the freezer and have out of town guest visiting next Thursday night. I was thinking of hearty pastrami sandwiches and salads or slaw for an easy meal since I have to work that day and will have little time to prepare.

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Thanks to all for responding. Anna, good point about the spices. I will use just half the amount called for. It seems I have two options. One is to cook it for 16 hours at 175 and the other is to cook it at 140 for 48 hours. This question is addressed to those who cooked it at around 140 - what was the body of the meat like? Did it have a cooked to medium look about it? This will be cooked as a corned beef dinner. I do not have access to a smoker or any other type of bbq equipment as I live in a condo and such things are strictly verboten (hangs her head in sorrow).

 

 

It doesn't really look like a medium steak.  It's a firm texture, though not dry at all, red all the way through due to the cure.  The texture is something like lightly cooked dry-cured bacon, which is more or less what it is.  I served some of it crisped a bit in the pan on sandwiches and again, it wasn't dry or overcooked or falling apart. 

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i obviously have never cooked corned beef sous vide or I wouldn't be asking the question. I am only cooking it sous vide because every now and again I like to try something different. In the past, I have always done them in a slow cooker or on the stove top. I too would be curious as to the texture. As far as the colour goes, I know the meat will be red but I believe that is because of the curing salt and to me is different that the red that results from cooking meat to a medium rare or medium stage. One thing I like about trying different cooking methods is the resulting texture. I will never do lamb shanks again in anything but a pressure cooker nor beef short ribs in any other way than sous vide. Mind you, I've had my share of total failures and less than stellar results as well.

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Last night we had a brisket that I corned for 7 days and cooked sous vide at 180ºF for 10 hours. After cooking, I refrigerated it overnight. Before serving, I sliced it and put it in a baking dish, added some juices from the bag and some water, covered it with foil and warmed it up. Best I ever ate. 

 

11080757_10153800909278569_3487191832831577259_o.jpg

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Since I have not achieved a sublime SV corned beef/pastrami, what is the textural advantages over more conventional methods? It's going to be red due to the cure either way so I'm assuming there is more textural advantages as well as the obvious advantage of minimal attention during cooking.

Along with my poor attempt at a SV pastrami last year I have a store bought prepared corned beef in the freezer and have out of town guest visiting next Thursday night. I was thinking of hearty pastrami sandwiches and salads or slaw for an easy meal since I have to work that day and will have little time to prepare.

For me sv corned beef lets me use top round which in my hands would overcook if simmered. Texture is great. Like delicase meat but seasoned how I like it.

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I do mine at 180F for 10 hours.  It comes out fantastic.  The meat is denser than if made in the slow cooker and it has more flavor.  I pre-soak the beef in cold water overnight to remove some of the saltiness.  Vacuum pack with the spice packet.  I use the juice to heat the cabbage and carrots.  Here is one of my posts from the Dinner thread: http://forums.egullet.org/topic/147265-dinner-2014-part-2/page-8?hl=%2Bcorned+%2Bbeef+%2Bsous+%2Bjuice#entry1959379

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I do mine at 180F for 10 hours.  It comes out fantastic.  The meat is denser than if made in the slow cooker and it has more flavor.  I pre-soak the beef in cold water overnight to remove some of the saltiness.  Vacuum pack with the spice packet.  I use the juice to heat the cabbage and carrots.  Here is one of my posts from the Dinner thread: http://forums.egullet.org/topic/147265-dinner-2014-part-2/page-8?hl=%2Bcorned+%2Bbeef+%2Bsous+%2Bjuice#entry1959379

Your pre-soak seems like a good idea. I'll try it next time.

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  • 11 months later...

Well, the adventure continues. Big ol' brisket (7.2 pounds, grassfed) came out of the brine yesterday (Ruhlman recipe, five days as specified). I soaked it about 24 hours, with two or three water changes during that. Cut it in half; bagged one half with pickling spice, rubbed down the other one with a pastrami rub that alleges to "be like Katz's," and, having not had the pleasure of eating at Katz's, I don't guess I'll know if it does or not. (Recipe here.) It went into the bath at 145 degrees (what most of the SV threads I've read agreed upon), and will stay there for 24 hours-ish. The pastrami will chill and then go in the freezer to be smoked at a later date. The corned beef will be checked for tenderness and taste tomorrow night, and hopefully will be duly ready for dinner on Thursday. With, of course, cabbage, potatoes and carrots. And beer. Much beer.

56e9d94105d0e_cbandpastrami.jpg.331104ae

Front, the pastrami, waiting to be bagged; rear, corned beef, bagged with pickling spice.

 

56e9d97c71c82_cbpastramiinSV.jpg.9f7a20a

Coming up to temp.

 

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