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The Soup Topic (2013–)


FrogPrincesse
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23 hours ago, Darienne said:

Winter is definitely soup time at the McAuleys.  Big time.  Yesterday made several containers of Albondigas and several of Harira.  A few days before it was whatever was left in the fridge at the time soup.  Plus some mystery meat from the kitchen fridge freezer.  Delicious none the less.  The cellar freezer (we have four altogether) is full of soups.  Soup is our every second day supper, while salad is the other.  

 

What happened to popcorn for supper?

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16 minutes ago, ElsieD said:

 

What happened to popcorn for supper?

Good point.  Had completely forgotten that one.  And Ed just bought some new popcorn last week.  It's not been my best year, I fear.  Well, 14 months now.  I think I am due for some kind of reprieve.  I hope.  I hope.  Thanks for asking, Elsie. 

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Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

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On 12/5/2021 at 10:50 AM, Darienne said:

Winter is definitely soup time at the McAuleys.  Big time.  Yesterday made several containers of Albondigas and several of Harira.  A few days before it was whatever was left in the fridge at the time soup.  Plus some mystery meat from the kitchen fridge freezer.  Delicious none the less.  The cellar freezer (we have four altogether) is full of soups.  Soup is our every second day supper, while salad is the other.  

We are the same - numerous containers of soups in the freezer and at least twice a week we have choose-your-own-soup-night. As the chief cook and bottle washer, these are good nights for me! I often make bread or bisquits to go along and it is one of our favourite meals.

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I want to put in a good word for Gabrielle Hamilton's White Borscht, which is easily located on the NYT site. Apparently it was a great comfort and a reasonably priced winter soup for her when she was an impoverished chef-to-be living on the lower east side, where Polish food had a foothold. I grew up on the upper west side, and we didn't know from white borscht, only red.

 

Anyway, I made the recipe almost to the letter, although I halved it. It's a soup that makes its own gravy so to speak, so you don't have to start with labor-intensive stock or remember to unfreeze any. The stock itself is simply made with smoked kielbasa and cooks for only half an hour. I know kielbasa is ubiquitous but I've never eaten it before, and it's good!  I had to buy the kielbasa and some russets, but I already had some leeks and creme fraiche. The only change I would make next time is to add more potatoes and not use so much of the cooked sausage in the final soup. Her version is meatier than I like. Also she adds more salt than is necessary, but for me that's almost always true. Yes, russets do need salt, but the kielbasa broth has plenty; salt is so personal. It was just as good the next day leftover. Really nice to have a new kind of soup!

Edited by Katie Meadow (log)
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No pics, but worth mentioning: pumpkin tangerine soup.     Still working on the Cinderella Halloween pumpkin.   

Pumpkin simmered with onion and garlic, pureed with tangerine zest and juice.   Splash of cream.  

Subtle and haunting flavor combination.    Will repeat and would readily serve this as starter to guests.

 

Note: original recipe called for orange zest and juice plus shower of fresh thyme at service.    I subbed tangerine and didn't have fresh thyme.   Did not miss it.

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I haven't been in this thread in a while, which was dumb!

On 1/25/2022 at 2:26 PM, Margaret Pilgrim said:

Subtle and haunting flavor combination. 

This sounds wonderful, I'm going to try it with my routine pumpkin sub:  sweet potatoes.    I admit that this substitution is much more workable when the pumpkin is a minor player; but I'm going to see.  I eat pumpkin when it lands in my life, but I don't care for it all that much, so I don't ever really want to buy it.   

 

I just got my new delivery of California tangerines last week, only to discover that I still have juice in the freezer from last year's tangerines.  So I am looking for ways to get that space back; this is right on time!  

IMG_3452.JPG

Edited by SLB (log)
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18 minutes ago, SLB said:

I haven't been in this thread in a while, which was dumb!

This sounds wonderful, I'm going to try it with my routine pumpkin sub:  sweet potatoes.    I admit that this substitution is much more workable when the pumpkin is a minor player; but I'm going to see.  I eat pumpkin when it lands in my life, but I don't care for it all that much, so I don't ever really want to buy it.   

 

I just got my new delivery of California tangerines last week, only to discover that I still have juice in the freezer from last year's tangerines.  So I am looking for ways to get that space back; this is right on time!  

IMG_3452.JPG

When my tangerines and tangelos are in full glory I definitely use them as an additional flavor note, and acid hint, in things like the mentioned soup. I like rich coconut as the cream element ad please do as @Margaret Pilgrim did - use some of that floral zest. If subbing sweet potato or even with pumpkin - I like to get some caramelization on them to deepen the flavor.

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This is exceeding the topic, and I hope for a teeny indulgence to note in response-- you know what is excellent with an orange note?  Beans.  Bean soups, sure.  But any kinda beans.  I got that from Ms. Wolfert, years ago. 

 

Orange beans are the bomb.  

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58 minutes ago, SLB said:

This is exceeding the topic, and I hope for a teeny indulgence to note in response-- you know what is excellent with an orange note?  Beans.  Bean soups, sure.  But any kinda beans.  I got that from Ms. Wolfert, years ago. 

 

Orange beans are the bomb.  

Trust me - with the abundance of homegrown citrus I have had the luxury of being round most of my life - I've used them abundantly. Also the marmalades as a flavor hit instead of sugar so many places - including beans ;) Nuac mam with a mixed citrus marmalade as the sweet element - roundly approved.

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Had leftover brown rice from last night’s Asian take out, chicken stock made from supermarket rotisserie chicken during the week (plus some bits of meat picked off the carcass), so I resolved to finally use some dried seaweed that had been in the pantry a long time. Presoaked the seaweed. However, didn’t realize how much it would swell up, so my intended soup, with the rice also absorbing, is rather dense.

 

AEAC73E4-EF54-4D58-A09F-08E191031E19.jpeg

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"Only dull people are brilliant at breakfast" - Oscar Wilde

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Middle eastern style lentil soup. Cumin, paprika, celery, carrots, garlic, lemon, parsely, bay, pepper.  1/3 blended smooth. the rest intact.

And an Italian gremolata of parsley, lemon zest, garlic and olive oil.

 

 

PXL_20220219_122546177.jpeg

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~ Shai N.

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17 minutes ago, shain said:

Middle eastern style lentil soup. Cumin, paprika, celery, carrots, garlic, lemon, parsely, bay, pepper.  1/3 blended smooth. the rest intact.

And an Italian gremolata of parsley, lemon zest, garlic and olive oil.

 

 

PXL_20220219_122546177.jpeg

That looks delicious.  Were the carrots diced or grated, please?

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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2 hours ago, Darienne said:

That looks delicious.  Were the carrots diced or grated, please?

Thanks - all the vegetables are diced, and not too small, so the that they can be felt.

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~ Shai N.

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  • 1 month later...

Soup made with leftover chicken. Also potatoes, bacon. Fridge clean out, basically. Went down well with the family.

IMG_20220323_134803.jpg

Edited by Kerala (log)
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Hngarian mushroom soup. With paprika, roux, vegetable stock, dill, thyme, sour cream. Garlic-rubbed toasted bread, and beer.

 

PXL_20220311_190549445.thumb.jpg.1f819da527671041fa7e8efd49f0b78f.jpg

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~ Shai N.

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Leftover chicken from last night's barbecue, corn, etc. Threw in some cheddar, chopped parsley. Winner winner, chicken dinner! Whole family very appreciative, healthy meal with little effort. IMG_20220327_153840.thumb.jpg.07e4a5844356e0384eb6b7f72d8f18e4.jpg

I should really just stop trying so hard!

But, of course, I'm actually cooking for me.

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I wanted to make Ash Reshteh around Nowruz but the greenery looked less than lush. I do a scaled down personal adaptation as I'm the onky eater Hopefully soon as the weather is cool again and it is so comforting. Anyone do a version for spring?

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