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FrogPrincesse

The Soup Topic (2013–)

385 posts in this topic

Tortilla soup this evening. <br />I really like this soup

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Plantes Vertes, glad you have come to like (at least some) broth-soups with unblended stuff in it.

Some recent soups:

Edible amaranth (Amaranthus dubius; 莧菜; green variety) in chicken stock w/ smashed garlic & softened dried shrimp (“Har Mai”).

(See: http://forums.egullet.org/topic/143989-lunch-whatd-ya-have-2012/page-11#entry1919422)

• Young kale wilted in chicken stock with garlic & olive oil.

(See: http://forums.egullet.org/topic/143989-lunch-whatd-ya-have-2012/page-11#entry1919959)

• Fresh asparagus & broccoli briefly simmered in chicken stock.

(See: http://forums.egullet.org/topic/143989-lunch-whatd-ya-have-2012/page-11#entry1920164)

• Pork spare ribs & wolfberry leaves soup.

(See: http://forums.egullet.org/topic/143989-lunch-whatd-ya-have-2012/page-11#entry1921696)

• Pork, daikon & radish soup.

(See: http://forums.egullet.org/topic/143989-lunch-whatd-ya-have-2012/page-11#entry1921696)

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I finished making a beef consomme that I will serve to my mother at a surprise dinner to thank her for being very kind to me recently.

I don't love anyone but her enough to bother doing this ever again... :wacko:

attachicon.gif002 (640x480).jpg

Would you be good enough, please, to tell your process?

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I finished making a beef consomme that I will serve to my mother at a surprise dinner to thank her for being very kind to me recently.

I don't love anyone but her enough to bother doing this ever again... :wacko:

attachicon.gif002 (640x480).jpg

Would you be good enough, please, to tell your process?

I, too, would like more info.

If you have the time and feel comfortable sharing.

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I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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I love the old fashion tomato soup, when I make tomates farcies, I use the pulp with water and beef stock let it simmer for a while, mash it then salt pepper and butter and it is the most delicious soup ever!

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Hi Jaymes and furzzy - sorry I didn't notice your questions until now.

I used this recipe for the stock with some guidance from the Guardian, roasting the bones for 1h and boiling for 8h (I painted a bedroom and put up a set of shelves in the meantime! A productive day :biggrin:).

Then I followed the Joy of Cooking directions for clarifying, which have you use 'several' fowl carcasses (3 in my case) plus 1/4lb lean ground beef, an unspecified number of uncooked tomato skins (I used 2 chopped beef tomatoes in their skins for the whole pot) and 1 slightly beaten egg white and 1 roughly crushed shell per 2 pints of stock.You mix them into the cold stock, then heat very slowly until the foam rises. Simmer for 2 hours and cool for 1 hour. Then you push the foam gently away from one side and ladle the stock out from underneath, straining through sterile muslin into a bowl. The only modification I made to those instructions was to add an onion, cut on the horizontal and scorched to black on the cut sides, to the simmer, to brown the stock.


Edited by Plantes Vertes (log)
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This is a squash soup made with 1 squash, 1 large sauteed onion, a can of coconut milk, a small handful of coriander and juice of 1/2 lime. I halved the squash and cooked it in the microwave for 15 minutes, then peeled it and chopped up the flesh, added everything but the coriander to the pot with water to cover, simmered 10 mins, added the coriander and blended. It's garnished with some toasted seeds.

This soup was so good!


007 (640x480).jpg


Edited by Plantes Vertes (log)
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This one's tomato, broccoli and roasted garlic: 1 head of broccoli, 1l tomato juice, 1 head garlic roasted in olive oil. Simmer until the broccoli is soft, blend.

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And this is Russian black bean soup; cook maybe 3-4 cups dry beans in the pressure cooker with an onion, a couple of carrots and tomatoes, 2-3 cloves garlic and a few sticks of celery, chopped, ample water and a bay leaf, chilli powder, paprika and 3 cardamom pods; fish out the whole spices (use a tea ball or similar as the beans dye everything purple and they're impossible to find otherwise) then blend with some salt and pepper. You can serve it with sour cream. Don't plan on eating much else. It's pretty rib-sticking.

004 (640x480).jpg


Edited by Plantes Vertes (log)
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During the height of ramp season, I was fortunate enough to obtain five pounds or so. The bulbs and white stems were pickled and canned for use in salads, garnish for roasts, and the occasional midnight snack. I simmered the ramp greens with chicken stock, cream, onion, Yukon Gold potatoes, and pureed it with an immersion blender before serving. The overall effect was similar to potato leek soup, but with a bold spring green hue and a heady aroma of garlic and chive. It was definitely not the soup of first dates, but the taste was worth the threat of sleeping alone. :laugh:

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“You can’t define these in a recipe. You can only know them...”

-- Julia Child

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Some recent soups:

• Fish balls, Italian basil & “Seafood Mushrooms” in chicken stock soup.

[see: http://forums.egullet.org/topic/143989-lunch-whatd-ya-have-2012/page-11#entry1922716]

• Tofu & spinach soup.

[see: http://forums.egullet.org/topic/143989-lunch-whatd-ya-have-2012/page-11#entry1922716]

• Lotus root & pork spare ribs soup.

[see: http://forums.egullet.org/topic/143989-lunch-whatd-ya-have-2012/page-11#entry1922716]

Pork & shrimp wontons w/ spinach, celery & scallions in a chicken broth.

[see: http://forums.egullet.org/topic/143989-lunch-whatd-ya-have-2012/page-11#entry1922716]

• Asparagus & baby squash either in chicken broth or in chicken stock.

[see: http://forums.egullet.org/topic/143989-lunch-whatd-ya-have-2012/page-11#entry1923881]

• Red Russian Kale in gingered chicken stock.

[see: http://forums.egullet.org/topic/143989-lunch-whatd-ya-have-2012/page-11#entry1923881]

• "Harm Choy Tong" w/ pork spare ribs, tomatoes, tofu.

[see: http://forums.egullet.org/topic/143989-lunch-whatd-ya-have-2012/page-11#entry1923881]

• A version of borscht.

[see: http://forums.egullet.org/topic/143989-lunch-whatd-ya-have-2012/page-11#entry1923881]

• Pork belly & vegetable soup.

[see: http://forums.egullet.org/topic/143989-lunch-whatd-ya-have-2012/page-12#entry1925164]

• Taiwan AA-choy in chicken broth.

[see: http://forums.egullet.org/topic/143989-lunch-whatd-ya-have-2012/page-12#entry1925164]

• Meatless lotus root soup. (but dried cuttlefish used)

[see: http://forums.egullet.org/topic/143989-lunch-whatd-ya-have-2012/page-12#entry1925164]

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This is a marrow soup.

Marrow is one of my favourite vegetables and I am astounded that it is so little appreciated. My experience is that it is far less frequently bitter than courgettes, and it's a lot cheaper. I love it's texture when simply steamed - it goes sort of creamy when it starts to disintegrate - so I've never got much beyond just adding some garlic oil and eating it with salt and pepper. But this soup was worth missing out on my marrow mush :smile:

As you can see, the soup I make has not improved in looks very much but it seems to have much better flavour recently. The things I've changed are: 1) not sauteeing the main vegetables before adding the liquid, just boiling 2) adding a lot more liquid than previously and 3) adding a lot more onion than before. The soups seem so much fresher now and the texture is better. I guess it's worth changing an old technique once in a while.

This one was one large marrow, boiled in a good 2l light stock, 2 medium onions and 4 cloves garlic, sauteed, lemon juice, salt and pepper.

001 (640x480).jpg

ETA: I add lemon juice to my soups for sourness, but this would be an excellent marrow and yogurt soup.


Edited by Plantes Vertes (log)
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Forgive my ignorance, but what makes it Genovese style? ;D

Minestrone alla genovese for Italians just means with added pesto at the end of cooking, out of the heat.

But I had to ask in Italian cooking forums, to people from Genova, what it is really included in this soup.

This is the answer I had and I made the soup accordingly:

The minestrone genovese doesn't have tomatoes, or carrots, nor onions, squash in used in small amount in the winter, the main vegetables in this minestrone are lume' (fresh beans similar to borlotti), zucchini, green beans and eggplant (just one and the tiny round variety that is used in Liguria for stuffing) and the lucky one that finds it in his bowl can eat it, then a lot of potatoes because the minestrone should be dense, so that a spoon can stand in it. The vegetables are cut very small, also the potatoes, although some need to be left whole, so you know then it's ready. The vegetables are not pureed but crushed with a fork. The pasta especially brichetti are used, or rice. So you need to take into consideration the cooking time and time to let the soup cool down a bit. The pesto is added out of the stove, never let the pesto cook. Actually, the pesto for minestrone is slightly different: in the mortar pound the garlic and the grated cheese, add the basil, and ending with more cheese. No pine nuts, the taste of which would be lost in the minestrone and people from Genova are known to be parsimonious. Some extra virgin olive oil.

My notes: I made the minestrone in the pressure cooker:30 minutes. The look was not particularly appetizing at first, but I crushed with the fork the vegetables and the whole potatoes, added the pasta and cooked al dente (brichetti hold the cooking very well), adjusted salt. It needs to be stirred often, the bottom tend to burn easily. I added pesto out of the stove and let it cool. It is normally greener because Genovesi like it with more pesto than me. It is different then my normal minestrone but I really enjoyed it.


Edited by Franci (log)

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Here are a Zucchini Vichyssoise from a couple of days ago, and a Roasted Red Pepper/Tomato Soup.

Garnishes are a zucchini strip, and a creme fraiche, crouton, 18-yr. Balsamic drizzile.image.jpgimage.jpg

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Suvir Saran's chilled yogurt soup with cucumber and mint from Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day.

I love this soup because it is ready in 5 minutes in the blender. Roast then grind some cumin seeds; blend yogurt, cucumbers (cut in chunks with the skin on), green chiles (I use a little bit of jalapeno tabasco if I don't have fresh green chiles), garam masala and fresh mint. Really nice and fresh for the summer; it reminds me a little of cucumber raita in soup form. I was hungry and forgot to snap a photo. :smile:

Watermelon and cucumber gazpacho. This one was an experiment - I had a watermelon and an abundance of cucumbers. It turned out quite nice with plenty of seasoning (lime juice, again some mint, salt & black pepper, and a drizzle of olive oil added after the picture). Diced watermelon and feta garnish.

9391329672_32dc7aa7db_z.jpg

Who else is doing cold summer soups?



Edited by FrogPrincesse (log)

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Pea and Mint

The lady who looked after my brother and I (and a gang of other kids and a large family of her own) when we were children made soup for us every day for lunch. We tormented our mother by complaining that her soup was not as good. This reminded me of her.

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The soup today was leek and pea.

Two small leeks, 1/2lb peas, vegetable stock, 1/2tsp citric acid, salt and pepper.


008 (640x480).jpg

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More chilled soups for me.

Cucumber sorrel gazpacho from Russ Parsons' How to Pick a Peach. It has the particularity of using raw sorrel. It has a fresh crisp taste, with some nice acidity from the sorrel.

9566584241_46bbff60c1_z.jpg

White gazpacho from the Tartine Bread cookbook. That one is almond-based. The garnish is a little salad with tomato | cucumber | red grape | mint. Very comforting and cooling.

9524063183_ccc59ca209_z.jpg


Edited by FrogPrincesse (log)
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Nigel Slater's spiced pumpkin soup with bacon. Homemade Italian semolina bread on the side.

10636632784_ee768d9b3f_z.jpg

This was a squash (butternut I think) which was diced and cooked with some onion and garlic. The spices were toasted coriander and cumin seeds, and dry chiles for a little bit of heat. Once the squash starts to brown, chicken stock is added. The soup is pureed at the end with some heavy cream. It reminds me of Paula Wolfert's autumn squash soup, but whereas her version is redolent of garlic, this one puts the emphasis on the spices, coriander and cumin. The garnish is little lardons of home-cured fresh bacon.

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Various soups from recent months...

Slow-simmered chicken broth w/ or w/o chicken in the ladled-out soup, but usually w/ the chicken skin (with the fat, of course! :-) ) and w/ the veggies (and others added in) [there is also some overlap w/ the "soupy noodles" category below]:

http://forums.egullet.org/topic/144211-breakfast-2013/page-8?p=1925162#entry1925162

http://forums.egullet.org/topic/144211-breakfast-2013/page-10?p=1928104#entry1928104 (scroll down)

http://forums.egullet.org/topic/144211-breakfast-2013/page-14?p=1938785#entry1938785

http://forums.egullet.org/topic/143989-lunch-whatd-ya-have-2012/page-12?p=1925777#entry1925777 (scroll down)

http://forums.egullet.org/topic/143989-lunch-whatd-ya-have-2012/page-12?p=1927242#entry1927242 (scroll down)

http://forums.egullet.org/topic/143989-lunch-whatd-ya-have-2012/page-15?p=1935057#entry1935057 (scroll down)

http://forums.egullet.org/topic/143989-lunch-whatd-ya-have-2012/page-15?p=1938783#entry1938783 (scroll down)

http://forums.egullet.org/topic/145774-dinner-2013-part-5/page-6?p=1936859#entry1936859

Soupy noodles in various formulations. I enjoy this kind of common (and almost quintessential) E/SE Asian foodstuff - noodles in some sort of broth. Pho, of course, would be an example of this genre of "soup" that is well-known to USAmericans and others around the world.

http://forums.egullet.org/topic/144211-breakfast-2013/page-9?p=1926268#entry1926268

http://forums.egullet.org/topic/144211-breakfast-2013/page-13?p=1936125#entry1936125

http://forums.egullet.org/topic/144211-breakfast-2013/page-14?p=1937639#entry1937639

http://forums.egullet.org/topic/144211-breakfast-2013/page-14?p=1938639#entry1938639

http://forums.egullet.org/topic/143989-lunch-whatd-ya-have-2012/page-12?p=1925164#entry1925164

http://forums.egullet.org/topic/143989-lunch-whatd-ya-have-2012/page-15?p=1935057#entry1935057 (scroll down)

http://forums.egullet.org/topic/143989-lunch-whatd-ya-have-2012/page-17?p=1942406#entry1942406 (scroll down)

http://forums.egullet.org/topic/145774-dinner-2013-part-5/page-11?p=1939312#entry1939312 (scroll down)

Of course, I also often make soupy "instant ramen/noodles" gussied up with this-and-that. Shamelessly. ;-)

http://forums.egullet.org/topic/144211-breakfast-2013/page-11?p=1930020#entry1930020

http://forums.egullet.org/topic/144211-breakfast-2013/page-13?p=1936861#entry1936861

http://forums.egullet.org/topic/144211-breakfast-2013/page-15?p=1940797#entry1940797

http://forums.egullet.org/topic/144211-breakfast-2013/page-15?p=1941136#entry1941136

http://forums.egullet.org/topic/144211-breakfast-2013/page-15?p=1942411#entry1942411

http://forums.egullet.org/topic/144211-breakfast-2013/page-16?p=1942770#entry1942770

http://forums.egullet.org/topic/143989-lunch-whatd-ya-have-2012/page-12?p=1925164#entry1925164 (scroll down)

More iterations of lotus root soup.

http://forums.egullet.org/topic/144211-breakfast-2013/page-9?p=1926303#entry1926303

http://forums.egullet.org/topic/143989-lunch-whatd-ya-have-2012/page-12?p=1925164#entry1925164 (scroll down)

http://forums.egullet.org/topic/143989-lunch-whatd-ya-have-2012/page-14?p=1930692#entry1930692 (scroll down)

http://forums.egullet.org/topic/143989-lunch-whatd-ya-have-2012/page-15?p=1933370#entry1933370 (scroll down)

Winter melon soup.

http://forums.egullet.org/topic/144211-breakfast-2013/page-10?p=1928104#entry1928104 (scroll down)

http://forums.egullet.org/topic/143989-lunch-whatd-ya-have-2012/page-13?p=1928105#entry1928105 (scroll down)

Leek & potato soup. Chunky style. In general I prefer pieces of stuff in my soups - I don't feel "soup" needs to be homogenized into a smooth liquid as is common (but, sure, not universal) in European/Western cuisine.

http://forums.egullet.org/topic/144211-breakfast-2013/page-11?p=1930668#entry1930668

http://forums.egullet.org/topic/144211-breakfast-2013/page-15?p=1941136#entry1941136 (scroll down)

Angled loofah soup, w/ various other stuff in it.

http://forums.egullet.org/topic/144211-breakfast-2013/page-12?p=1930679#entry1930679

http://forums.egullet.org/topic/143989-lunch-whatd-ya-have-2012/page-13?p=1928105#entry1928105 (scroll down)

Corn & malunggay leaves soup. A Filipino-type soup.

http://forums.egullet.org/topic/144211-breakfast-2013/page-12?p=1931853#entry1931853

Bak Kut Teh.

http://forums.egullet.org/topic/144211-breakfast-2013/page-12?p=1933024#entry1933024

http://forums.egullet.org/topic/144211-breakfast-2013/page-15?p=1942411#entry1942411 (scroll down)

http://forums.egullet.org/topic/145774-dinner-2013-part-5/page-5?p=1936272#entry1936272

Pork belly & vegetables soup:

http://forums.egullet.org/topic/143989-lunch-whatd-ya-have-2012/page-12?p=1925164#entry1925164

Cucumber soup.

http://forums.egullet.org/topic/143989-lunch-whatd-ya-have-2012/page-12?p=1925777#entry1925777 (scroll down)

http://forums.egullet.org/topic/143989-lunch-whatd-ya-have-2012/page-13?p=1928105#entry1928105 (scroll down)

Pea soup.

http://forums.egullet.org/topic/143989-lunch-whatd-ya-have-2012/page-13?p=1928105#entry1928105 (scroll down)

Tomato soup.

http://forums.egullet.org/topic/143989-lunch-whatd-ya-have-2012/page-14?p=1929704#entry1929704

http://forums.egullet.org/topic/145774-dinner-2013-part-5/page-3?p=1935063#entry1935063

Collard greens soup.

http://forums.egullet.org/topic/143989-lunch-whatd-ya-have-2012/page-14?p=1931306#entry1931306

Chinese rose wine & shrimp soup.

http://forums.egullet.org/topic/143989-lunch-whatd-ya-have-2012/page-15?p=1937648#entry1937648 (scroll down)

Beef shin & vegetables soup.

http://forums.egullet.org/topic/143989-lunch-whatd-ya-have-2012/page-16?p=1940789#entry1940789

Chinese mushroom, snow fungus & lily bud soup.

http://forums.egullet.org/topic/143989-lunch-whatd-ya-have-2012/page-17?p=1942406#entry1942406

Choy Kon Tong (dehydrated cole/dehydrated Bok Choy soup)

http://forums.egullet.org/topic/143989-lunch-whatd-ya-have-2012/page-17?p=1943119#entry1943119

Harm Choy Tong (sour/pickled/salted mustard soup)

http://forums.egullet.org/topic/145774-dinner-2013-part-5/page-3?p=1935063#entry1935063 (scroll down)

Opo squash soup.

http://forums.egullet.org/topic/145774-dinner-2013-part-5/page-11?p=1939312#entry1939312

Watercress soup.

http://forums.egullet.org/topic/145774-dinner-2013-part-5/page-14?p=1940897#entry1940897

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Six Mushroom Soup

It may not look great, but the intense aroma and taste was just magical.

6 mushroom soup.jpg

Fresh Mushrooms: Button Mushrooms, King Oyster Mushrooms (pleurotus eryngii, 杏鲍菇 xìng bào gū), Jade Gill Mushrooms (海鲜菇 hǎi xiān gū), tiny Oyster Mushrooms (Pleurotus geesteranus, 秀珍菇 xiù zhēn gū)

mixed fresh mushrooms.jpg

Dried Mushroms: Cepes, Wild Shiitake Mushrooms

All the mushrooms, except the geesteranus oyster mushrooms were first sautéed in butter with onion and garlic and a little chopped chilli, then the filtered dry mushroom soaking liquid was added to make a soup which was simmered for about an hour.

mushroom soup making.jpg

This was then blitzed with the stick blender, then reheated. The tiny oyster mushrooms were then cooked whole in the blitzed soup. A little cream was added before serving.


Edited by liuzhou (log)
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Six Mushroom Soup

It may not look great, but the intense aroma and taste was just magical.

attachicon.gif6 mushroom soup.jpg

Fresh Mushrooms: Button Mushrooms, King Oyster Mushrooms (pleurotus eryngii, 杏鲍菇 xìng bào gū), Jade Gill Mushrooms (海鲜菇 hǎi xiān gū), tiny Oyster Mushrooms (Pleurotus geesteranus, 秀珍菇 xiù zhēn gū)

attachicon.gifmixed fresh mushrooms.jpg

Dried Mushroms: Cepes, Wild Shiitake Mushrooms

All the mushrooms, except the geesteranus oyster mushrooms were first sautéed in butter with onion and garlic and a little chopped chilli, then the filtered dry mushroom soaking liquid was added to make a soup which was simmered for about an hour.

attachicon.gifmushroom soup making.jpg

This was then blitzed with the stick blender, then reheated. The tiny oyster mushrooms were then cooked whole in the blitzed soup. A little cream was added before serving.

I will be trying this... Thanks for sharing.


Edited by heidih Fix quote tags (log)

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