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FrogPrincesse

The Soup Topic (2013–)

351 posts in this topic

Some soups I've made recently (soupy noodles included):

Winter melon & beef short ribs soup. Full post: http://forums.egullet.org/topic/143989-lunch-whatd-ya-have-2012/page-5#entry1908111

"Shui Gow Ngap Tong Meen". Full post: http://forums.egullet.org/topic/143989-lunch-whatd-ya-have-2012/page-5#entry1908265

Phở. Full posts: http://forums.egullet.org/topic/143989-lunch-whatd-ya-have-2012/page-5#entry1908520 and http://forums.egullet.org/topic/143989-lunch-whatd-ya-have-2012/page-5#entry1908630

Salmon & tuna soup, with various stuff. Full post: http://forums.egullet.org/topic/143989-lunch-whatd-ya-have-2012/page-6#entry1909644

Pork & shiitake mushroom wonton (home-made) soup. Full post: http://forums.egullet.org/topic/143989-lunch-whatd-ya-have-2012/page-6#entry1909650

Beef & veggie "stew" (soup). Full post: http://forums.egullet.org/topic/143989-lunch-whatd-ya-have-2012/page-6#entry1909817

Snow fungus, scallion, cilantro & celery soup. Full post: http://forums.egullet.org/topic/143989-lunch-whatd-ya-have-2012/page-6#entry1910081

Pork spare rib, shiitake mushroom & daikon soup. Full post: http://forums.egullet.org/topic/143989-lunch-whatd-ya-have-2012/page-6#entry1910081

Shrimp & pork wonton (Home-made) wonton soup w/ wonton noodles & "Char-siu". Full post: http://forums.egullet.org/topic/143989-lunch-whatd-ya-have-2012/page-7#entry1910389

Snow fungus & button mushroom soup. Full post: http://forums.egullet.org/topic/143989-lunch-whatd-ya-have-2012/page-7#entry1910667

"Chinese okra", snow fungus, shiitake mushroom & Chinese fish cake soup. Full post: http://forums.egullet.org/topic/143989-lunch-whatd-ya-have-2012/page-7#entry1911234

Lotus root & pork spare ribs soup. Full post: http://forums.egullet.org/topic/143989-lunch-whatd-ya-have-2012/page-8#entry1911915

Wood-ear fungus, snow fungus & scallion soup. Full post: http://forums.egullet.org/topic/143989-lunch-whatd-ya-have-2012/page-8#entry1912014

Soup w/ baby green tips, fresh shiitake, pork, Japanese scallion. Full post: http://forums.egullet.org/topic/143989-lunch-whatd-ya-have-2012/page-8#entry1912753

Vegetable soup in chicken broth. Full post: http://forums.egullet.org/topic/144211-breakfast-2013/page-3#entry1910843




Also:

Edible chrysanthemum (large-leaved) in broth. Full post: http://forums.egullet.org/topic/143989-lunch-whatd-ya-have-2012/page-8#entry1912014

Taiwan "choy sum" in broth. Full post: http://forums.egullet.org/topic/143989-lunch-whatd-ya-have-2012/page-8#entry1912569

Various other commercial wonton/shui-kow soups w/ or w/o noodles. See, e.g.: http://forums.egullet.org/topic/144211-breakfast-2013/page-3#entry1912279 ; http://forums.egullet.org/topic/144211-breakfast-2013/page-3#entry1912908 ; http://forums.egullet.org/topic/144603-dinner-2013-part-2/#entry1911050 ; http://forums.egullet.org/topic/143989-lunch-whatd-ya-have-2012/page-8#entry1912878 .





Edited by huiray (log)

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Just sayin' a tiny piece of star anise is a great addition to chicken-noodle soup (I used roast turkey/raw chicken frames to make the stock).


It's almost never bad to feed someone.

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Just sayin' a tiny piece of star anise is a great addition to chicken-noodle soup (I used roast turkey/raw chicken frames to make the stock).

I find that a few fresh ginger coins balance that nicely. The star anise alone to me is reminiscent of grandma's cloves stuck in the unpeeled onion that were standard in her chicken or beef soup. Also nice.

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Today I made a beautiful one of diced swede (the same as rutabaga, as I just discovered), celeriac and onion, red chillis, ginger, smoked paprika, lemon juice and coconut milk. I sweated the vegetables and spices for 20mins or so, then added vegetable stock, salt and pepper and simmered it for a further half hour, pureed and reheated with coconut milk and lemon juice added. I garnished it with fresh coriander. It was ethnically confused but it cleared out the vegetable rack and was very good to eat with home-made seed bread on this snowy April day.

Yes. Snow in April. :sad:


Edited by Plantes Vertes (log)

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Just sayin' a tiny piece of star anise is a great addition to chicken-noodle soup (I used roast turkey/raw chicken frames to make the stock).

I find that a few fresh ginger coins balance that nicely. The star anise alone to me is reminiscent of grandma's cloves stuck in the unpeeled onion that were standard in her chicken or beef soup. Also nice.
I'll try a little ginger, too. I'm trying to keep the "Asian" flavours flying under the radar.

It's almost never bad to feed someone.

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Today, pea and mint with fresh chives and spirulina.

Saute a small onion, add 1lb green peas and stock to cover, boil to cook peas, puree, add chopped mint, chives, lemon juice, salt and white pepper and 1/2-1tsp spirulina. Garnish with olive oil and croutons.

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I never seem to get around to posting pix, so this is a little out of season (at least here in Tucson, where it is in the 80s), but this chestnut soup is one of my favorites. Vacuum packed chestnuts from Trader Joe's work well, as do canned chestnuts from France, if you don't prepare your own.

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Today, carrot, cumin, chilli and coriander. And ginger and onions.

I roasted the carrots, onions and spices in olive oil, then pureed with stock, salt and pepper and garnished with a lot of coriander.

I find it hard to know when to stop eating soup. It tastes so good and I always make more than two servings, even though we are only two. :biggrin:


Edited by Plantes Vertes (log)

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Today, desperate to obey two harsh gods - Punctuality and Greed - I made an excellent tomato soup in under 10 mins. Food purists and any who distrust the microwave, please avert your gaze.

I put a small chopped shallot covered with olive oil into the microwave for 3 mins. (It turns out perfectly this way; soft and lightly caramelised, but you mustn't completely cover the vessel - use a lid with vents - otherwise the onion will steam and taste soapy.) Then I added 1lb of baby plum tomatoes, stabbed to release the juices, and microwaved for 4 more minutes. To finish I pureed it with a large handful of parsley, salt and black pepper. No added liquid. It tasted like cream.


Edited by Plantes Vertes (log)

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Starting to make caldo verde tonight. <br /><br />ImageUploadedByTapatalk1365635750.752618.jpg

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Fresh tomato and basil soup. The stock is heavy cream and the pan gelee left over from the Easter ham. I was going to make tomato gravy and it morphed into soup. We are getting some great tomatoes out of South Florida.

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Starting to make caldo verde tonight.

ImageUploadedByTapatalk1365635750.752618.jpg

Looks good. What is caldo verde?

It's a Portuguese kale and potato soup. Often with linguica or other sausage or meat.

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Today I made celery and apple pureed soup with some new potatoes and an onion. I garnished it with powdered dehydrated celery and apple, celery leaves and apple batons.

I served it with cider bread. The bread made me a little drunk. I might dilute the cider next time... or I might not. :smile:


Edited by Plantes Vertes (log)

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Today's was leek and potato pureed soup (leeks, new potatoes, onion, garlic, vegetable stock, salt and black pepper, braised) with chiffonade of leeks and brunoise potatoes cooked separately and added back in, and garnished with a blanched chiffonade of leeks and mixed herb pistou.


Edited by Plantes Vertes (log)

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Today I made black bean soup with some celery, carrots, onion, garlic, and vegetable stock. The spices were cardamom, paprika and chilli. Garnished with fermented beetroot and parsley.


Edited by Plantes Vertes (log)

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Paul Bertolli's Cauliflower Soup

In the same vein as Gordon's Ramsey broccoli soup, it's hard to beat the simplicity. After sweating thinly sliced onions, the cauliflower is added and cooked in a small amount of water for about 15 minutes (lid on), and then simmered for an additional 20 minutes with additional water (lid off). There are no other ingredients except salt, pepper, and olive oil. The soup thickens when blended and has a very smooth texture. It's really good and highlights the delicate flavor of the cauliflower. This is a nice change from soups that use roasted cauliflower.

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FrogPrincesse, I was so intrigued by your post and finally made the cauliflower soup today. WOW, it is so delicious!! So fresh and cauliflowery. The earthy flavor of olive oil just elevates the delicacy of cauliflower. Thank you for sharing!

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Life is beautiful.

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FrogPrincesse, I was so intrigued by your post and finally made the cauliflower soup today. WOW, it is so delicious!! So fresh and cauliflowery. The earthy flavor of olive oil just elevates the delicacy of cauliflower. Thank you for sharing!

You are very welcome Tina. Great photo! I am glad that you enjoyed this soup. It's so simple and so interesting at the same time. I love recipes that are deceptively simple but end up surprising you. For me they are a source of inspiration.

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Hot and sour soup; vegetable broth, mushroom broth, cornstarch, wood ear fungus, water chestnut, bamboo shoots, tofu, beansprouts, scallions, ginger, red chillies, garlic, soy sauce, Chianking vinegar, white wine vinegar, salt, white pepper.

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You are very welcome Tina. Great photo! I am glad that you enjoyed this soup. It's so simple and so interesting at the same time. I love recipes that are deceptively simple but end up surprising you. For me they are a source of inspiration.

I've made this soup a couple of times, and each time it was good, but I was somewhat disappointed. I'm going to make it again tonight. I am convinced that really FRESH cauli will make the difference. A few hours ago I got the freshest cauli I've had in months, and will be using a much "cleaner" chemical-free water than that which comes from my tap. I am also going to use a very fresh leek along with the onion instead of just the storage onions I've used before. I'll let y'all know how it turns out.


 ... Shel


 

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I just finished making Bertolli's Cauliflower Soup, and it is the best version I've made thus far. Fresh, quality ingredients made all the difference. This is one great soup.


Edited by Shel_B (log)

 ... Shel


 

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I just finished making Bertolli's Cauliflower Soup, and it is the best version I've made thus far. Fresh, quality ingredients made all the difference. This is one great soup.

I am happy to read that you liked the soup in the end. With such a simple recipe, I agree that the quality of the ingredients makes a huge impact.


Edited by FrogPrincesse (log)

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For rainy nights: a soup with carrots, a lot of shallot, potatoes (3 part of carrots, 1 part of potatoes), bay leaf, chicken broth.

When cooked (not too much, we don't need carrots puree!) add a spoon of butter, half a cup of fresh cream (or greek yougurt) every 4-5 cups of soup and blend.

Put in the individual bowls and decorate with chopped parsley, black pepper and crumbled Amaretto cookies (for who don't know them, they are cookies made in the same Italian factory where they do the Amaretto di Saronno liquor and they have more or less the same taste - minus the alcohol, of course).

To me it's a winter/early spring soup, but if the night isn't rainy you can also serve it cold - at room temperature, don't put into the fridge.


My Italian Homemade Liqueurs and Pastries recipes at: http://italianliqueurs.blogspot.com.es

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