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Turkish Bay Leaves Online


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I'd like to get some good quality Turkish bay leaves. I've not purchased them online before, so I'd like to know which supplier provides good, fresh, quality leaves. Some pics I've seen from a couple of shops show leaves that look, to my mind, pretty dried out. Any help? Thanks!

... Shel

 ... Shel


 

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I always buy from Penzey's. 4 oz. is a lot of bay leaves.

Yeah ... most people seem to buy from Penzys, but ... are their bay leaves fresh or dried out? I want fresh leaves, or as fresh as possible. I guess I wasn't clear in my original post.

... Shel

 ... Shel


 

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I don't know if you're getting fresh Turkish bay leaves - the ones I buy from Penzey's are dried.

You can get fresh California bay leaves, I'm pretty sure....a different species entirely.

I live surrounded by bay laurel ... no need to buy the leaves should I want them. I would like fresh Turkish bay leaves. Does such a thing exist here in the US?

... Shel

 ... Shel


 

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WIKI:

Bay laurel (Laurus nobilis, Lauraceae). Fresh or dried bay leaves are used in cooking for their distinctive flavor and fragrance. The leaves are often used to flavor soups, stews, braises andpâtés in Mediterranean cuisine. The fresh leaves are very mild and do not develop their full flavor until several weeks after picking and drying...

If you find fresh bay laurel leaves, please let us know.

Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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WIKI:

Bay laurel (Laurus nobilis, Lauraceae). Fresh or dried bay leaves are used in cooking for their distinctive flavor and fragrance. The leaves are often used to flavor soups, stews, braises andpâtés in Mediterranean cuisine. The fresh leaves are very mild and do not develop their full flavor until several weeks after picking and drying...

If you find fresh bay laurel leaves, please let us know.

they are easy to grow in a pot in the window,I just took a cutting off the one I have had for many years and am in the process of rooting it so i will have 2 plants...they are much better fresh,by the way,,,,Bud
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Fresh mediterranean bay laurel is a common enough plant....I have one in a pot and one in the ground. Fresh leaves are sold at the farmers market too. But bay laurel is the common name of two different plants. California bay (umbellularia something or other) that is a different species from the Mediterranean bay laurel (laurus nobilis), right? I and many others in the SE US grow it as a culinary ornamental.

Edited by HungryC (log)
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Fresh bay laurel is a common enough plant....I have one in a pot and one in the ground. Fresh leaves are sold at the farmers market too. But you can buy them online fairly cheaply here: http://www.localharvest.org/fresh-picked-bay-leaf-still-on-branch-100-C13624

That's great, but they're not bay laurel, or Turkish bay leaves. As it says on that web page:

This variety is twice as potent as the Mediterranean type, so use accordingly.

Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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I have two stands of sweet bay, bay laurel, Laurus nobilis etc.

The leaves labeled "Turkish bay" are exactly the same.

It is easy to dry the leaves, cut a branch, break the leaves off the stem and put them in a wire colander and leave them on the counter till dry enough to break easily.

Then store them in a tightly sealed jar.

I simply pick a few every week and always have enough in various degrees from fresh to dry - I simmer the fresh in milk for custards, etc., use the dry in meat dishes, pot roasts, stews, etc.

Do not use California bay in cooking, it is a totally different plant and is not suitable for culinary use. It is often sold in Mexican markets because it is much cheaper than sweet bay and is often contaminated because it is gathered in places where the soil is contaminated.

I just took these photos and picked these leaves. As they dry the flavor will become more concentrated and stronger. When fresh use three or four where you would use one when dried.

HPIM4908.JPG

HPIM4907.JPG This was supposed to be a "dwarf" variety - it is 15 feet tall.

HPIM4905.JPG

HPIM4906.JPG

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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By the way. The bay leaves grown in Turkey are usually stored for many months before being shipped to other countries.

McCormick sources all its bay leaves from Turkey and has a huge facility there.

After shipping to the U.S. the leaves may be stored for months or years prior to bottling and then stored many more months before being shipped to retailers.

I have been growing my own for forty + years. I brought one bush with me when I moved up here from the San Fernando Valley, although I was told it would not survive outside during the winters when we have very hard freezes.

Obviously mine have thrived and acclimated to the altitude and climate. Occasionally some leaves will have brown edges from freezing but otherwise the plants have done fine and this winter we had single-digit temps.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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