Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Indirect Heat

Desserts of Brittany (Bretagne)

Recommended Posts

This past Saturday, we had an amazing 9 course tasting meal at the Breton restaurant La Porte in Montreal. It was the perfect way to celebrate our tenth anniversary. The dessert was a Kouigne-Amann, served with a salted caramel sauce and a buttermilk sorbet. I'd never heard of this dessert, much less tasted it, and it was divine.

During dinner, we talked about what we wanted to do before our 20th anniversary. For one of my goals, my wife has set me the task of learning how to make a perfect Kouigne-Amann. Can anyone recommend some top quality Breton cookbooks? In English or French? (Preferably French?)

Thanks in advance.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Similar Content

    • By pastrygirl
      A mistake was made with my Albert Uster order this week and I received it twice.  Since it's shipped from CA, doesn't go bad, and I'll use it eventually, I'm not going to mess with trying to return the second delivery.  But now I have a huge amount of inventory so I thought I'd see if anyone here was looking for Felchlin by the bag. 
       
      Each bag is 2kg (4# 7oz) in the following varieties and prices:
       
      Maracaibo Creole 49%, $48
      Sao Palme 60%, $30
      Arriba 72%, $46
       
      As for shipping, I can fit 2 bags in a medium flat rate box for $14 or 3 bags in a large box for $19 to go anywhere in the USA.  
       
      If you'd like some, PM me with your selection, email, and shipping address.  I'll invoice you via Square and you can pay securely online with a credit card.
       
      Thanks for reading!
    • By umami5
      Has anyone come across a digital version of Practical Professional Cookery (revised 3rd edition) H.L. Cracknell & R.J. Kaufmann.
      I am using this as the textbook for my culinary arts students and a digital version would come in very handy for creating notes and handouts.
    • By Porthos
      @Smithy Your request gave me the imputes to finally word-process the recipe. My DW use Excel, which drives me to distraction.
       
       
      Mom's Apple Raisin Walnut Cranberry Pie
       
      4 baking apples, peeled, cored, and sliced
      1 cup golden raisins
      1 cup walnuts
      1 cup fresh cranberries
      1/4 cup flour
      1 cup sugar
      2 tablespoons margarine or butter
      2 pie crusts to fit a 9- or 10-inch pie pan
       
      Heat oven to 425F.
      In a large bowl, mix the first four ingredients.  In a small bowl, mix the flour and sugar together.  Sprinkle the flour/sugar mixture over the large bowl, mixing lightly with fingers.  Place first pie crust
      into pie pan, pricking with a fork.  Pour the fruit mixture into the pie shell.  Dot with the margarine or butter, then cover with second pie crust, crimping
      edges together and making sure top crust is vented.
       
      Bake at 425F for 15 minutes, then turn down oven to 350F for about 45 minutes.
       
      *** I use Braeburn apples ***
    • By Mullinix18
      I dont believe that any English translation of Carêmes works exist. An incomplete version was published in 1842 (I think) but even the that version seems lackluster for the few recipes it does cover. I think it's time the world looks to its past, but I don't speak great French and it's a huge task to undertake. I hopefully plan on publishing this work and anyone who helps me will get a very fair cut, and if we decide not to publish it, I'll put it out on the internet for free. I'm working in Google docs so we can collaborate. I'm first cataloging the index to cross reference the pre-existing incomplete English version to give us a reference of what yet needs to be done, and from there we will go down the list of recipies and Translate them one by one. Simple google translate goes only so far, as it is 1700s French culinary terms and phrases being used. I'd like to preserve as much of Carêmes beautiful and flowery language as possible. Who's with me? 
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×