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Sous Vide: Recipes, Techniques & Equipment, 2012


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Slow, tasty suicide (adapted from Peter Gilmore's recipe for slow-braised pork cheeks w/ celeriac and mushrooms):

-- bag pork cheeks (trimmed, etc) w/ some reduced stock

-- 85C, 10 hours

-- chill

-- sear cheeks then put in pan w/ more reduced stock and park in 180C oven for 10 minutes

-- reduce that and use to glaze the resting cheeks

Yeah.

Things you might want to go with your dinner, sort of supporting acts:

-- a very light salad with a fairly acidic dressing

-- a dram of, say, Fernet Branca

-- a nearby bed

-- at least one of eG's doctors on speed dial

Edited by ChrisTaylor (log)

Chris Taylor

Host, eG Forums - ctaylor@egstaff.org

 

I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

Melbourne
Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between

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So I have some nice looking vac-packed blade steak I picked up at the farmer's market and am considering whether to to open it, season the steaks, and reseal in ziplocs or just whack the meat as-is into the SV. This train of thought brought me to wondering whether salting meat before a long, slow, moist cook is more-or-less brining it and if so, how much of the SV texture relates to this, rather than the low-temperature cooking. Ideas?

It's almost never bad to feed someone.

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This looks like a perfect opportunity to test it out. Open one steak and season it as prescribed in the recipe of your choice. Leave a second one in the original bag and cook both of them at 55C (or slightly less if you like it rare) for 5 or 6 hours and see what you get. It can't hurt and you will learn something!

Paul Eggermann

Vice President, Secretary and webmaster

Les Marmitons of New Jersey

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Personally, I"m not a fan of salting before doing long SV... I did it for a few years, then at some point started cooking unseasoned, and then season right before searing or serving (if not searing). I find the meat gets a bit tougher - almost cured texture when seasoning prior to a long cook. Dave Arnold agrees - one of his more recent posts (cookingissues.com) does a comparison of salting pre and post SV.

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Polyscience sells the Minipacki-Torre, so you might go to their web page to learn more. I purchsased mine from them and highly recomment Minipack-Torre for chamber vacuums-they are terrific.

"A cloud o' dust! Could be most anything. Even a whirling dervish.

That, gentlemen, is the whirlingest dervish of them all." - The Professionals by Richard Brooks

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This looks like a perfect opportunity to test it out. Open one steak and season it as prescribed in the recipe of your choice. Leave a second one in the original bag and cook both of them at 55C (or slightly less if you like it rare) for 5 or 6 hours and see what you get. It can't hurt and you will learn something!

Took your suggestion for the test. I didn't notice a huge difference between the 2 but 24 hours was probably too much, even though it was a relatively tough cut. So I'll try your shorter time next time and probably just season with pepper.

It's almost never bad to feed someone.

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560617_10152186741500125_1152848262_n.jpg

Beef ribs. 'Seasoned' only with a dab of Vegemite before cooking. 54C for 72 hours. Then brushed with (commercial) BBQ sauce and given a couple minutes on the grill. Hit with some sea salt. Inferior to the 56/48ers, I think.

Chris Taylor

Host, eG Forums - ctaylor@egstaff.org

 

I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

Melbourne
Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between

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560617_10152186741500125_1152848262_n.jpg

Beef ribs. 'Seasoned' only with a dab of Vegemite before cooking. 54C for 72 hours. Then brushed with (commercial) BBQ sauce and given a couple minutes on the grill. Hit with some sea salt. Inferior to the 56/48ers, I think.

Inferior in what way?

Sent from my Nexus 7 using Tapatalk 2

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yes. when my propane canister finishes, Ill move to MAP gas.

I have this single barrel model which I really like: you dont have to tilt the propane cylinder.

http://www.torchsale...m/warrinfo.html

im thinking of the triple barrel :

http://www.torchsale...hinfo.html its said to put out 30,000 BTU with MAP

( I cant get the second link to work. click on the first and the the upper L tab to see the double and tripple barrel models.)

its pricey: 90 bucks or so. but ive not had acceptable success on SV rare (130) steak with the single barrel regular propane: make it med-rare.

100 bucks buys a lot of steak.

Ill have the CkBr again tonight for dinner, with similar greens. I now make 12 at a time, 3:30 at 145.

I also in a pinch make gravy from Minors Roasted Chicken soup base, which I modify with any jus from the bag on the potatoes and add garlic, Bell's seasoning, Mesquite Liguid smoke ( very very little!) etc.

Edited by rotuts (log)
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yes. when my propane canister finishes, Ill move to MAP gas.

I have this single barrel model which I really like: you dont have to tilt the propane cylinder.

http://www.torchsale...m/warrinfo.html

im thinking of the triple barrel :

http://www.torchsale...hinfo.html its said to put out 30,000 BTU with MAP

( I cant get the second link to work. click on the first and the the upper L tab to see the double and tripple barrel models.)

its pricey: 90 bucks or so. but ive not had acceptable success on SV rare (130) steak with the single barrel regular propane: make it med-rare.

100 bucks buys a lot of steak.

Ill have the CkBr again tonight for dinner, with similar greens. I now make 12 at a time, 3:30 at 145.

I also in a pinch make gravy from Minors Roasted Chicken soup base, which I modify with any jus from the bag on the potatoes and add garlic, Bell's seasoning, Mesquite Liguid smoke ( very very little!) etc.

I corrected your second link, now it works.

Peter F. Gruber aka Pedro

eG Ethics Signatory

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So. Chicken.

Breasts: rubbed w/ spice, left to ponder this situation for a while, then 60C for 3 hours (i.e. put it on, go out, get delayed, return home after 3 hours), chilled then smoked at high heat for 20 minutes.

Legs: rubbed w/ spice, left to ponder this situation for a while, then 65.5C for 4 hours (i.e. I went out and got delayed twice in the same day) then chilled and smoked for 20 minutes.

Nice enough. Might need to be refined a little, but the potential is there.

EDIT

I should add that the credit for all this goes to Keith W, the best cook I know.

Edited by ChrisTaylor (log)

Chris Taylor

Host, eG Forums - ctaylor@egstaff.org

 

I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

Melbourne
Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between

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Greetings. I'm the very guy here, and after several days of reading this thread, I realize that what I know about cooking sous vide is miniscule at best. The wealth of information here is amazing. I started experimenting with SV about 5 years ago with a stock pot and a thermometer. I now have a built in water bath with an immersion circulator sourced from a lab supply company. I'm pleased to say my success rate is greater than my failures. I'm so glad I discovered this forum, and know I'll learn a ton and hope to contribute some of my personal experience. Greg

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GH: welcome! can you tell us about that immersion circulator you use? what temps does it tolerate and where did you get it? $$? may thanks!

Thank you. My circulator is made by Freed Electric. I found it online after deciding I wanted one, but didn't want to pay the premium Poly Science wanted (just in case I didn't love the process). I checked with my brother prior to purchase, as he's more familiar with such electronic devices. I recall I paid about $200 shipped, but it's been 4 years ago, so I'm not 100% sure, and I can remember the site I bought it from. It will heat from 10 to 110 C, I need a cover and to insulate my pan to maintain temps over 75C for long periods though. It's ok since I rarely require anything above that. I found a steam table pan at work that was never installed. I removed the 240 volt heater from it, screwed a ball valve to the drain and installed it into my counter. I doubt it will help resale value of the house, but I'll cross that bridge when I get there. I'll get a pic up soon.

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Perhaps 54/72 beef ribs are superior after all. Last time I didn't pre-season them--well, there was Vegemite in the bag, but that's all--because of chatter around these parts about that sort of thing. This time I preseasoned them--a bit of salt, pepper and a tiny amount of chilli powder. They were seared then sliced and served in the form of a salad w/ cashews, mizuna, tomatoes, Viet mint, red onion and a dressing made w/ lime juice, rice vin, fish sauce and sugar.

Chris Taylor

Host, eG Forums - ctaylor@egstaff.org

 

I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

Melbourne
Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between

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So have you all seen this? Nomiku:

It is going to retail at $359. It is the cheapest circulator yet...really going to make it accessible to home cooks on a small budget

http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/nomiku/nomiku-bring-sous-vide-into-your-kitchen?ref=live

What do you think?

I've got one body and one life, I'm going to take care of them.

I'm blogging as the Fabulous Food Fanatic here.

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So have you all seen this? Nomiku:

It is going to retail at $359. It is the cheapest circulator yet...really going to make it accessible to home cooks on a small budget

http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/nomiku/nomiku-bring-sous-vide-into-your-kitchen?ref=live

What do you think?

There's a discussion of it on this link.

Nick Reynolds, aka "nickrey"

"The Internet is full of false information." Plato
My eG Foodblog

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