Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Sous Vide: Recipes, Techniques & Equipment, 2012


rotuts
 Share

Recommended Posts

Any suggestions for cooking oxtail?

There's a recipe at British Larder that suggests 82⁰C (180⁰F) for 14 hours, and one from mengwong that suggests 57⁰C (135⁰F) for 24 hours followed by 70⁰C (158⁰F) for 48 hours. The butcher I bought it from suggested "overnight" at 80⁰C. All of those seem a bit high for cooking even a tough cut of beef.

I was thinking of 57⁰C for about 48 hours, and seeing what it's like.

Any thoughts?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ive never done oxtail, and similar times and temps are mentioned in Bladwin for two tough cuts: cheek and brisket. He does not list oxtail

the 175 (80 C) for 24 hours is called 'Well, quick'

the 160 (70 C) for 1 - 2 days is called 'Well, slow'

Im assuming you want for oxtail 'well' of some sort.

good luck and pls report back.

:smile:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Beef spare ribs- marinated overnight, smoked with cherry wood for 3 hours at 225 and then placed in Sous Vide for 48 hours at 140 degrees- absolutely amazing!! They were refrigerated, so I reheated them with some barbecue sauce covered in a 140 degree oven, and then quickly grilled them.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I actually do have a recipe for braised oxtail on page 62 of my book; I recommend 175F/80C for 12–18 hours.

Modernist Cuisine takes it to the limit and proposes 100 hours at 60ºC. Takes a long time but really works.

I've been playing around with sous vide for over a year now and I'm still not sure how these different combinations are calculated. Personally, I've always had great results with the lower temperatures and longer times - I generally cook everything at 58-60C and pork ribs / pork belly are divine after 72 hours.

But assuming that oxtails cooked for 100 hours at 60C are comparable to those cooked for 12-18 hours at 80C, is there some rule that can be used? If you graph these time/temperature combinations is it linear? Or is there some way of quantifying the texture from a given combination?

Considering the amount of discussion that's been given to the significance of 1 degree when cooking an egg - and I do realise that meat and eggs are different - I've always been intrigued by this and would love to know more...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

thanks for the interesting Oxtail ref. in Spanish. oxtails might be quite different if they came from an old 'ox' or a standard 'beef bred for meat' cattle, which is all most of us can get.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've been playing around with sous vide for over a year now and I'm still not sure how these different combinations are calculated. Personally, I've always had great results with the lower temperatures and longer times - I generally cook everything at 58-60C and pork ribs / pork belly are divine after 72 hours.

But assuming that oxtails cooked for 100 hours at 60C are comparable to those cooked for 12-18 hours at 80C, is there some rule that can be used? If you graph these time/temperature combinations is it linear? Or is there some way of quantifying the texture from a given combination?

Considering the amount of discussion that's been given to the significance of 1 degree when cooking an egg - and I do realise that meat and eggs are different - I've always been intrigued by this and would love to know more...

The relation is very far from linear! And both texture and juiciness depend heavily on the temperature. I tried to summarize it here, but it is in Spanish. I find the messages from Nathan and Douglas about tough cuts very instructive about this.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The relation is very far from linear! And both texture and juiciness depend heavily on the temperature. I tried to summarize it here, but it is in Spanish. I find the messages from Nathan and Douglas about tough cuts very instructive about this.

The built in translation feature in Google Chrome does a very readable job on the spanish link. Very interesting and useful, thanks! I'd expect other translation mechanisms to work as well, spanish seems to translate well.

Edited by Paul Kierstead (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think a rule of thumb I read somewhere is that gelatinization rate halves (aka, you need to cook it for twice as long to get the same tenderness) for every 15F decrease.

A rule of thumb Nathanm has mentioned a couple of times is doubling the time for every 10ºC increase, but I think when going to the lower limit (from 80 or 70 to 60ºC) things take place even more slowly and the increase in time may be even higher. Many chemical reactions go faster with temperature in an exponential way.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...