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Sous Vide: Recipes, Techniques & Equipment, 2012


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Id like to SV some sausage. Some would be breakfast and some dinner. Chill then freeze for convenience sake.

pasteurize. keep 'juicy' clearly tenderness is not an issue.

145 3 hours? less?

thanks

I am also interested in this! But to take it a step further, i want to make the oxtail faggots from Heston at home book. He braises them in stock at 90c for 9 hours, but that's in the oven. How should I do them SV? or should i confit them?

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hey guys,

once again a question concerning sous vide from me to you.

i would like to produce a perfect almost hard cooked egg ( hard white and firm yolk).

i have seen some charts about eggs sous vide cooked and thought about cooking it sous vide for 1 hour at 67 degrees celsius and the cook them for 2 minuted in boiling water.

does anybody have any experience with eggs cooked this way?

its quite important for me they the egg white is really stiff and not runny and the yolk is still a bit creamy but not runny either.

i appreciate your help!

thanks

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hey guys,

once again a question concerning sous vide from me to you.

i would like to produce a perfect almost hard cooked egg ( hard white and firm yolk).

i have seen some charts about eggs sous vide cooked and thought about cooking it sous vide for 1 hour at 67 degrees celsius and the cook them for 2 minuted in boiling water.

does anybody have any experience with eggs cooked this way?

its quite important for me they the egg white is really stiff and not runny and the yolk is still a bit creamy but not runny either.

i appreciate your help!

thanks

Have you checked out the discussion of Sous Vide Hard Cooked Eggs?

Michaela, aka "Mjx"
Manager, eG Forums
mscioscia@egstaff.org

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hey,

just read the topic and realized it didn't help much so the question is up again!

the problem is that sous vide would be perfect since i have to cook 100 eggs. also, i would love to know if it is ok to take hard cooked eggs, place them in ice water and use them the other day, appreciate you help, i will start experimenting!

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Modernist Cuisine recently sent out a recipe for the ultimate eggs. I haven't tried it but it makes sense to me. Just forget about dyeing them with beet juice!

I have done many large batches of sous vide eggs and runny whites is the usual source of complaints from some people. Many times I drain off the really runny part and deliver a shimmering egg with a soft white and perfect yolk.

Edited by paulpegg (log)

Paul Eggermann

Vice President, Secretary and webmaster

Les Marmitons of New Jersey

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thanks a lot! sounds really interesting!

i will check the recipe out if it also works when i make the egg at 68 degrees celsius since i need the yolk to be stiffer!

edit: can i leave the modernist cuisine egg over night in the fridge without any problems or will it cause eventually any bacteria?

thanks!

Edited by philie (log)
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the bag that they used to immerse the eggs into the water looked weird. Was it just a plastic bag without a seal? Why not put the eggs straight in?

Eggs in a bath tend to bounce around with the strong pumps on the circulator..i think the bag just keeps them contained and from breaking from knocking into stuff and each other

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See the topic All about "sous-vide" eggs: egg shells may break, so either use a bath that's easy to clean (it's not worth ruining an IC or FMM), or place the eggs in a bag filled with hot water from the SV bath and suspend the bag on a skewer to avoid uncontrolled movements and to make retrieval easier. For hard eggs with a slightly creamy yolk you might use the delta-T method described in the sous vide page of wikiGullet, cooking at 75°C for the time required for the yolk to reach the desired consistency, then setting the white in boiling water. Note that the times in Douglas Baldwin's table are not valid when setting the white beforehand, as thermal diffusivity of set egg white is different from (i.e. lower than in) liquid egg white.

Peter F. Gruber aka Pedro

eG Ethics Signatory

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I'm having some problems with SV potato: I've been trying to make fondants and have found that cooking the potato rounds SV in butter and salt then browning gives a great visual appearance, however I'm not sure about the temp/time as the texture is still a little al dente at 85C for 60 mins. Any suggestions for different time/temp combos to try? The rounds are about 3/4" thick.

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I'm having some problems with SV potato: I've been trying to make fondants and have found that cooking the potato rounds SV in butter and salt then browning gives a great visual appearance, however I'm not sure about the temp/time as the texture is still a little al dente at 85C for 60 mins. Any suggestions for different time/temp combos to try? The rounds are about 3/4" thick.

I have had the same problem, tried them again for 2 hours at 84C and they were much better with a soft buttery texture.

Tom

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SV grass-fed 'CSA' beef: what's your experience compared with conventional 'feed-lot' finished beef?

i have two CSA sirloin steaks that id like to SV. I like my beef 'rare' ie 131. Ive repacked them with the type of seasoning I prefer and would like them to end up being tender yet not mealy. They seem to have very little marbling. Im trying to compare their flavor with that of a similar supermarket steak, also SV'd to similar tenderness. they are about 1/2 thick.

I had some bookmarks that Ive lost that suggested that CSA grass-fed beef be treated very differently in the SV bath.

thanks.

Edited by rotuts (log)
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SV grass-fed 'CSA' beef: what's your experience compared with conventional 'feed-lot' finished beef?

It will depend on how the farm raised the beef. The farm I buy beef from lets that animals wander around the pastures. They can eat grain if they want. The meat flavor is rich and complex, but steaks are a little tough compared to most market steaks. They also have less fat.

I have not SV'd steaks, but have done short ribs and shank sections. The flavor remained, and the tenderness was close. There were often thicker strips of connective tissue that remained chewy.

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I am back with my access of frozen/fresh iberico meat at trade prices! Hou would you guys approach it? It is served usual medium/ medium well

Ι have a whole loin (well, the trimmed peace after they make lomo, presa, cheeks and a piece of jowel which looks very promising.

I ve' done the pressa before in a watervbath and went for a beef ribeye method cooked meium rare on sous vide dash (iirc)

Edited by Toufas (log)
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I am back with my access of frozen/fresh iberico meat at trade prices! Hou would you guys approach it?

I prepare all tender cuts of ibérico at 55ºC, time as needed for heat to reach core according to tables/apps (or longer for pasteurization), then quick sear. Works well with loin, tenderloin, and presa (pictures on dinner thread).

Ibérico cheeks have become my all-time best meat for sous-vide, 36 hours at 65ºC, pictured on the dinner thread.

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I am back with my access of frozen/fresh iberico meat at trade prices! Hou would you guys approach it?

I prepare all tender cuts of ibérico at 55ºC, time as needed for heat to reach core according to tables/apps (or longer for pasteurization), then quick sear. Works well with loin, tenderloin, and presa (pictures on dinner thread).

Ibérico cheeks have become my all-time best meat for sous-vide, 36 hours at 65ºC, pictured on the dinner thread.

What about collar? We used to do a foie gras burger with it but I don't have a mincer at home (or trade prices foie!)

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I'm planning on using a charcoal chimney to emulate a salamander for some burgers coming from an SV bath.

To what degree should I allow the beef to cool before starting to sear? Should I go for uniformity of cooling or do I want just the outside cooled down? Will I get faster browning if I spritz on a glucose solution a la Baldwin? Does it really matter with the heat from the chimney?

Modernist Cuisine suggests submerging the already low temperature cooked burgers in liquid nitrogen then deep frying in very hot oil. The technique freezes the outer layer of the meat, but not the inner. As the burger cooks at a high heat the frozen portion defrosts and browns while the inner portion is insulated from the heat. From all reports, the result is a rare, but extremely crisp burger.

If I were in your situation (assuming you don't have access to liquid nitrogen), I would probably get dry ice, wrap it in cheese cloth and set it on both sides of the burger for 30 seconds to a minute, then grill. This should mimic liquid nitrogen closely. I would also probably skip the glucose. To be honest, I've never found it necessary. I get great maillard reactions without any additional additives, just a smoking hot pan and some high temp oil.

So I seared the burgers three ways: on a NG grill, with a blowtorch, and with a charcoal chimney, in order of worst to best. The grill took way too long to develop a good sear, and while the blowtorch could certainly deliver the BTUs, the heat was disproportionately transferred to the asperities of the meat, leading to blackened spotting before the whole of the surface developed good color. The charcoal chimney gave a nice, progressive, uniform sear, which was both fast and easily moderated.

For anybody else interested in searing atop a charcoal chimney, I would recommend filling the chimney at least 3/4 full otherwise the heat output will be lacking.

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What about collar? We used to do a foie gras burger with it but I don't have a mincer at home (or trade prices foie!)

Hi Toufas, is collar a part of the shoulder? In that case you won't find them here for Ibérico as they're always used for hams, only for "standard" pork, called "white pork" here. I think I've cooked those 60ºC/48 hours.

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The collar steak is the extension of the loin into the neck. The cut is traditionally used for the coppa. Even so, it is my favorite cut of pork, hands down. I normally sear mine medium rare. Collar steaks tend to have more flavor than a chop or loin at the cost of slightly decreased tenderness. If cooking sous vide, I would probably cook it somewhere between 57-60C depending on my mood. For a more tender product I would probably cook the collar for 12-16 hours, for a little more bite I would probably just let it hit core temperature and sear it.

IMG_6717+edit.jpg

Andrew Vaserfirer aka avaserfi

Host, eG Forums

avaserfirer@egstaff.org

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