• Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

weinoo

Pierre Ferrand's Dry Curacao

28 posts in this topic

I just picked up a bottle of this relatively new spirit and was wondering if anyone has tried it?

Any ideas for cocktail use?

I have it and really like it. I've had good results in a Maiden's Prayer and a Daiquiri no. 2. I think that it would be great in a Corpse Reviver no. 2 as well.

In margaritas, I still prefer Cointreau. Makes a more rounded margarita.


Edited by FrogPrincesse (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A recipe I like where I use it is the El Presidente from David Wondrich in the Sep/Oct 2011 Imbibe magazine although it doesn't use much. I just picked up a bottle of Oronoco rum which would probably work well in this drink!

El Presidente

This classic rum cocktail is refreshing and full of flavor. Be sure to use real grenadine for the best-tasting results.

1½ oz. rich white rum

1½ oz. Dolin Vermouth Blanc (Martini & Rossi or Cinzano Bianco are fine substitutes)

1 barspoon orange Curaçao or Grand Marnier

½ barspoon real grenadine

Thinly cut orange peel

Cracked ice

Tools: barspoon, mixing glass, strainer

Glass: cocktail

Garnish: maraschino cherry (optional)

Stir ingredients well with cracked ice and strain into a chilled glass. Twist a swatch of thinly cut orange peel over the top and drop in or discard as you prefer. Garnish, if desired, with a cherry.

Leon's in Decatur had another version of the El Presidente that I liked and where I think this curacao would work well but I don't have the full recipe. It included Scarlet Ibis rum, Punt e Mes, Curacao (their house version but I think the Ferrand would be good too), grenadine and orange bitters.


Edited by tanstaafl2 (log)

If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous, he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and a man. ~Mark Twain

Some people are like a Slinky. They are not really good for anything, but you still can't help but smile when you shove them down the stairs...

~tanstaafl2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As it's formulated for vintage recipes, it works best with same. The two drinks I've been going to consistently are a straight-up, dry Brandy Cocktail:

2 oz brandy (I use that great Marie Duffau armagnac)

1/2 oz PF curacao

2 dashes Angostura

2 dashes orange bitters (half Fee's half Regan's)

orange twist

And this No Name of my own:

2 oz Ransom Old Tom gin

1/2 oz PF curacao

1/2 oz Russo nocino

2 dashes Regan's orange bitters

I made this Arid, Extra Dry for the crew at Cook & Brown: bartenders liked it but chef thought it too dry, hence the square bracket:

1 oz Marie Duffau Napoleon Bas Armagnac

1 oz Ransom Old Tom gin

3/4 oz Pierre Ferrand dry curacao Ancienne Methode

[dash simple syrup if too dry]

dash Bitter Truth Jerry Thomas Decanter bitters

orange twist


Chris Amirault

camirault@eGstaff.org

eG Ethics Signatory

Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll second Chris in saying that this stuff and Ranson Old Tom are a marriage made in heaven (though not cheap!), and it makes a first rate Sidecar. Haven't tried it with light rum, must restock some Doulin Bianco . . . .


"The thirst for water is a primitive one. Thirst for wine means culture, and thirst for a cocktail is its highest expression."

Pepe Carvalho, The Buenos Aires Quintet by Manuel Vazquez Montalban

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Last night I did a side-by-side comparison of the Maiden's Prayer with the dry curacao vs. Cointreau. I liked the the dry curacao version, but in the end I preferred the Cointreau version. It had more depth and was more vibrant. The dry curacao version was a bit flat and bitter in comparison.

Note that I made the cocktail with Moro blood oranges, hence the color.

Maiden Prayer

1.5 oz gin

1 oz curacao

0.5 oz orange juice

0.5 oz lemon juice

8412176297_c109836c75_z.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not yet, I haven't passed by the AU area in a while and I don't really need anything else from there.

I mean, I could buy more rum, but that would just be irresponsible at this point....but I'm with you on thinking they're most likely to have it. By the way there's a new place on 14th Street, near Cork, that has a small but very impressive selection of stuff, lots of Haus Alpenz products. (Can't remember the name, and Ace is cheaper, I think)


Edited by Hassouni (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Last night I did a side-by-side comparison of the Maiden's Prayer with the dry curacao vs. Cointreau. I liked the the dry curacao version, but in the end I preferred the Cointreau version. It had more depth and was more vibrant. The dry curacao version was a bit flat and bitter in comparison.

Note that I made the cocktail with Moro blood oranges, hence the color.

Maiden Prayer

1.5 oz gin

1 oz curacao

0.5 oz orange juice

0.5 oz lemon juice

The recipe that I have for the Maiden's Prayer only calls for 1/2 ounce of Conintreau. Also, I would think the blood oranges add a hint of bitterness that, say, Valencia's won't.


Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

mweinstein@eGstaff.org

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The recipe that I have for the Maiden's Prayer only calls for 1/2 ounce of Conintreau. Also, I would think the blood oranges add a hint of bitterness that, say, Valencia's won't.

I posted what I used because I know that there are many versions if this cocktail. The Savoy version (3/8 oz dry gin, 3/8 oz Cointreau, 1/8 oz orange juice, 1/8 oz lemon juice) is even heavier on the Cointreau.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Have you tried a Pegu Club with it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, I'd start by dialing back the lime if you'er using PF Dry Curacao. Am I the only one that finds a Pegu Club a little ... boring?


Kindred Cocktails | Craft + Collect + Concoct + Categorize + Community

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes :raz:

I find the standard recipe uses far too little curaçao, though. Apart from the tartness, it's not as complex with the typical 1/4 oz or whatever usually called for.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, I'd start by dialing back the lime if you'er using PF Dry Curacao. Am I the only one that finds a Pegu Club a little ... boring?

Sorry to high jack, but someone mentioned a Pegu Club being boring.

I find this version to be unboring.

2 oz Tanqueray Gin

1/2 oz lime juice

1/2 oz Cointreau

1/4 oz Grand Marnier

2 dashes Angostura

2 dashes Regan's orange bitters

If I'm wanting dryer I'll skip the grand marnier(well right now it would be grand gala)

Beefeater has worked in this drink for me, but Plymouth has not. I haven't tried other gins yet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I loves me an equal parts drink:

1 oz Laird's BIB apple brandy

1 oz Ransom Old Tom

1 oz PF dry curacao

1 oz Rothman & Winter pear

2 dashes Aphrodite bitters


Chris Amirault

camirault@eGstaff.org

eG Ethics Signatory

Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Apple, juniper, malt, orange, pear, coffee, chocolate... that sounds like a hell of a drink.


DrunkLab.tumblr.com

”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, I'd start by dialing back the lime if you'er using PF Dry Curacao. Am I the only one that finds a Pegu Club a little ... boring?

Sorry to high jack, but someone mentioned a Pegu Club being boring.

I find this version to be unboring.

2 oz Tanqueray Gin

1/2 oz lime juice

1/2 oz Cointreau

1/4 oz Grand Marnier

2 dashes Angostura

2 dashes Regan's orange bitters

If I'm wanting dryer I'll skip the grand marnier(well right now it would be grand gala)

Beefeater has worked in this drink for me, but Plymouth has not. I haven't tried other gins yet.

I've tried a TON of different Pegu Clubs, and while they're all drinkable (with the exception of the Savoy version, which is awful), only a few have really impressed me. Here's my personal favorite:

2oz Bombay Sapphire

3/4oz lime juice

1/2oz Grand Marnier

1 dash Angostura bitters

1 dash orange bitters

Stir (DON'T SHAKE) and strain into a chilled glass

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, I'd start by dialing back the lime if you'er using PF Dry Curacao. Am I the only one that finds a Pegu Club a little ... boring?

Pegu Club with Hayman's Old Tom and the dry curacao was a huge hit at the gin cocktail class I taught Monday. We used proportions from Kindred, but I dialed back the lime to compensate for drier curacao.

1.5 gin

.75 curacao

.5 lime

dash angostura

dash Regan's


Tammy's Tastings

Creating unique food and drink experiences

eGullet Foodblogs #1 and #2
Dinner for 40

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Any updates?

 

For what it's worth, I find the Pegu Club to be an awfully dry cocktail to begin with

Yes - almost a year later.

 

12705304223_4bf02aff50_z.jpg

 

I used the ratios from Bartender's Choice (same as the Wondrich version although he only uses 1 dash of Ango). 2 oz (Junipero) gin, 3/4 oz lime juice, 3/4 oz (Pierre Ferrand dry) curacao, 2 dashes Angostura bitters, 1 dash (1 each Regan and Fee) orange bitters. It was quite dry but I did not mind.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.