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chefmd

Breakfast! 2013

483 posts in this topic

I was preparing breakfast when I cracked open my last duck egg and discovered it was twins.

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Anyway, I poached it and served it with duck fat fried potatoes and baked beans from a can. A proper breakfast! Washed down with lashings of coffee.

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Edited by liuzhou (log)
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B'fast today: Another iteration of slow-simmered chicken broth w/ carrots & celery, eaten w/ another brand of "mee sua". (See here for a previous version) The chicken broth was made using chicken legs (drumsticks) only, some pretty big ones, with big knobby joints which gave nice fall-off tender caps loaded w/ gelatin/softened joint caps. :-) The oil droplets are chicken fat (an appreciable amount was skimmed off), no additional oil was added to the stock/broth. The mee sua was a Taiwanese brand [Hung-Ming].

The package is labeled 台灣 (Taiwan)(white characters on a red ellipse) 手工麵線 (big red characters)("handmade noodle threads"). There is no English name on the package, neither front nor back. The 'Nutritional Facts' panel (on the back) is in both English and Chinese; but there is no ingredient list in English. The name of the distributor in the USA is in English. (p.s. This is sold in a large-ish Chinese/Asian grocery where the clientele is overwhelmingly of Chinese extraction, probably 95+%) :smile:

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Sometimes it seems that dinner just naturally segues into breakfast! When I opened the 'fridge this morning I immediately spotted the fried shallots leftover from the duck larb last evening. So a simple omelet topped with the re-heated and re-crisped shallots and some spicy Indian tomato chutney:

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Never call a stomach a tummy without good reason.” William Strunk Jr., The Elements of Style

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Scrambled eggs with stir-fried baby bok choy and carrots.

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Never call a stomach a tummy without good reason.” William Strunk Jr., The Elements of Style

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Where is everybody?

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Nigella Lawson's Eggs in Hell.

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Never call a stomach a tummy without good reason.” William Strunk Jr., The Elements of Style

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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its easy to forget how good eggs are with tomatoes.

thanks AnnaN

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I'm not familiar with egg dish. It is something that I know my husband would love. Thanks Anna.

Very easy. Saute a little garlic and a pinch of hot pepper flakes, add half a can (200 ml more or less) canned tomatoes and salt to taste. Bring to a simmer, break two eggs into the tomatoes, grate some parmesan over the eggs. Partially cover and simmer until eggs are done to your taste. If you are not low carbing then bread to sop up the sauce. If you are, then eat with a spoon!

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Never call a stomach a tummy without good reason.” William Strunk Jr., The Elements of Style

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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The Italians call it uova al purgatorio, or "eggs in purgatory". Not sure why Nigella changed it to Hell.

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Half a pomegranate.


There's nothing better than a good friend, except a good friend with CHOCOLATE.

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Parsi scrambled eggs. I only had a bird's eye chili and despite seeding it the heat level was a bit much for breakfast!

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Never call a stomach a tummy without good reason.” William Strunk Jr., The Elements of Style

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Breakfast today:

• Chicken broth w/ celery leaves & carrots & mee sua [Hung-Ming]. Broth made w/ a stewing chicken (chopped up), leafy celery, orange & yellow carrots, sliced ginger, sea salt; simmered about 6 hrs. Flesh & bones discarded, skin retained.

• Three soft-boiled (light green shelled) farm eggs. Drizzled w/ light soy sauce & dusted w/ white pepper.

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Beautiful dishes. Being from the the deep south it's difficult to appreciate the nuances between breakfast, lunch and dinner in eastern cooking . In the south breakfast has a sweet component and the noon meal can be either dinner or lunch depending on the volume and composition of the meal. It you performed manual labor the noon meal was dinner (meat and three) and supper (at least in my family) was leftover cornbread and buttermilk. What's the hierarchy in eastern cooking regarding the daily meal structure.

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Breakfast today, buttermilk scones and crab apple jelly.


Edited by Yellowbridge (log)
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Welcome, Yellowbridge.

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Leftover meat (beef and pork) and jarred antipasto.

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Never call a stomach a tummy without good reason.” William Strunk Jr., The Elements of Style

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Breakfast today:

Part 1: Nongshim Kimchi Bowl Noodle (this one), with lots and lots of additional fresh scallions added in.

Part 2: Last of the chicken broth from Sunday (broth only)(see here also), simmered w/ fresh yellow & orange farm-fresh carrots & conventional Western celery heart pieces, plus rounds of the remnant of a leftover pan-fried Merguez sausage (see here).

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Beautiful dishes. Being from the the deep south it's difficult to appreciate the nuances between breakfast, lunch and dinner in eastern cooking . In the south breakfast has a sweet component and the noon meal can be either dinner or lunch depending on the volume and composition of the meal. It you performed manual labor the noon meal was dinner (meat and three) and supper (at least in my family) was leftover cornbread and buttermilk. What's the hierarchy in eastern cooking regarding the daily meal structure.

Hi Steve,

I actually asked Huiray something similar here.

Steve, yes, do look at what I said in response to Plantes - perhaps that might answer your question at least in part?

As I mentioned there I may not be the best person to look to for an illustrative guide to the most typical and formularized breakfast-lunch-dinner sequence of dishes in "Eastern Cooking", as I tend not to draw sharp lines between types of food for any of the meals. I simply eat what pleases me. Note that I do tend to make lunch my main meal of the day (although I do not engage in manual labor) but, again, with many exceptions.

In any case, "Eastern Cooking" covers an awful lot of ground, and what might be thought of as frequently/often eaten for each of the meals will vary enormously between regions, countries, cuisines, sub-continental areas each bearing their own internal regionalities. One thing that can be said is that although buns and breads are often found here and there (and dumplings of some sort hither and yon) (i.e. other than dim-sum, which is well known to all, I imagine) - for breakfast, for example, and which can be sweet in nature - in the majority of cases (not all) the prevailing taste profile for breakfast dishes will tend to be savory, not sweet.

Have you heard of Kaya Toast, often served in Hainanese kopitiams in Malaysia & Singapore with soft-boiled eggs and thick Hainanese coffee (w/ sugar & evaporated/condensed milk = "Kopi-C") for breakfast? :-) For those unfamiliar with this (and the combination thereof) this might be a twist on Eggs & Toast w/ marmalade in the West... :-D


Edited by huiray (log)

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Percyn, welcome "home"! Glad to see you back!


"Commit random acts of senseless kindness"

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I was wondering the same thing. Strips of corn tortillas?

In Spain? My immediate impression was potato fries. Hmm??

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I was wondering the same thing. Strips of corn tortillas?

In Spain? My immediate impression was potato fries. Hmm??

Google suggests they are crisp, shoestring fries.

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Never call a stomach a tummy without good reason.” William Strunk Jr., The Elements of Style

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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