Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Home Made Ice Cream (2013– )


Recommended Posts

Jo, keep us updated! That thing looks great. You'll probably find a million non-ice cream uses for it too. I bet you could make stable emulsions without an emulsifier. Would be interesting to test a traditional vinaigrette (with mustard and a whisk) against one made without mustard but with the homogenizer. I wouldn't be surprised if the latter was more stable.

 

 

 

Note:  Jeni uses no eggs.  Neither in her commercial ice cream nor in her home recipes.  Though I am sure she would be among the first to affirm pasteurization is important.

 

She's just using the concentrated milk proteins as an emulsifier and stabilizer. It's a cool trick, but I can't imagine it offers any advantages over modern hydrocolloids, besides being easier to find and use. There are options which don't add any flavors, don't interfere with flavor release, work in minute quantities, and which can be tweaked to your heart's content to get the texture and other qualities you want.

Notes from the underbelly

Link to post
Share on other sites

This post and the next have been moved from the 'Fat in pate de fruits' discussion, as they are far more relevant here.
 

Oops.  There actually were two different recipes called jellies.  "Olive oil jellies", the recipe using gelatin, is at about 1:03 into the lecture.  The "soft creamy jelly" that uses carrageenan is at about 48 minutes.  I should have rewatched the whole video before commenting.
 
Fortunately I could find only the one recipe for "olive oil gummies".  That could really get confusing.
 
You realize that I am procrastinating from having to make ice cream?

 
Ha ha.  But ice cream is fun!  Maybe you should try making olive oil ice cream :)

Edited by Mjx
Note added. (log)
Link to post
Share on other sites

Ice cream is many good things, but it is seriously not fun.  So far into this batch I've had a muscle spasm in my leg, which among other things caused me to wet my pants.  My wrist is hurting so I had to pause for ibuprofen.  Not to mention an antispasmotic.

 

And I've only gotten as far as beating the yolks and sugars.

 

Olive oil ice cream would be easy.  I'd use the MC gelato recipe substituting olive oil for nut oil, and trehalose for all the sugar (if I wanted savory).  For the nut butter I'd choose a variety to complement the olive flavor -- off the top of my head, like walnut...I could be eating it by now.

 

I'll leave the pate de fruits science to you!

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I had but one project to accomplish all day.  Now it is 11:30 pm and I am finally sitting down with my first mai tai.

 

There is no pretense that this is a controlled experiment.  The main exercise was to see if I could maintain a constant temperature of mix near 161 deg F in the KitchenAid precise heat mixing bowl.  The bowl does well at keeping the contents just a degree or two below the setpoint as long as the lid is on.  But ice cream mix by Ruben's method must be stirred with the bowl uncovered for evaporation.  After much trial and error I found that by setting the bowl thermostat to 198 deg F I could hold the mix temperature in the range of about 159-160 while stirring.  This eliminates the chief source of grief trying to hold a constant temperature manually on the stove top for a full hour.

 

All in all the mix was in the KitchenAid for an hour and a half.  Much of this time the mix was as low as 149 deg F.  It was only close to the target temperature for about half an hour.  Note I had heated the mix on the stove top to 161 before adding it to the preheated 165 deg KitchenAid.  That's when the temperature dropped as low as 149 deg.

 

The mix was my usual:

 

heavy cream 750 ml

whole milk 250 ml

large egg yolks 6

sugar (sucrose) 90 g

trehalose 20 g

kosher salt pinch 

 

 

However for whole milk I used a new (to me) product:  Fa!rlife ultra-filtered whole milk (I wonder if they really mean nano?).  It is also ultra-pasteurized.  At least it was on sale.

 

After pasteurizing the mix I measured a reduction of 16% which is short of the 32% reduction called for by Ruben.  By about half, actually.

 

Sadly I have not been able to find literature on rotor-stator ice cream homogenization times.  Commercial ice cream typically employs high pressure homogenizers.  Modernist Cuisine uses a rotor-stator homogenizer for their gelato.  Since they do not hesitate to call out for a high pressure homogenizer when warranted I believe I am safe with using the rotor-stator homogenizer for ice cream.  I homogenized for about four minutes, approximately half on low and half on high.  This was partially determined by the BioSpec duty cycle of five minutes maximum.

 

When I tasted the cold mix it was not quite as sweet as I would have liked.  This is probably due to insufficient reduction.  But we shall see.

 

More tomorrow.

 

 

By the way, paulrapheal, if you know Michael Laiskonis let him know that his domain expired two days ago and his blog is off the air.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Laiskonis just moved his blog to luckypeach.com/category/columns/opusculum/ (to make it easier to remember?)

 

I've been investigating some of long cooking theories w/r/t protein denaturing and emulsification. Most of what's in the literature doesn't concern ice cream ... it acknowledges that sugar content can push temperatures up considerably, so there are a lot of question marks. Jenni Britton may know the most about this. She details her process on her site. Basically, she separates milk into skim and heavy cream, and then concentrates the skim portion with microfiltration, using no heat. She pasteurizes at 79°C for 2 hours (!) before homogenizing. her goal is like Ruben's ... to use the milk proteins as a stabilizer and emulsifier blend. This is related to what brands like Haagen Dazs do also, although they don't talk about their process.

 

I'm corresponding with Jenni about this. My primary concern is flavor. She believes that the long, slow cooking actually leads to more cooked milk flavor—which in her opinion is good in some circumstances and not in others. I may have to do a more regimented than usual experiment to see what time/temperature combination I like best in terms of flavor. I can deal with the texture through other means. For one, I'm happy to use hydrocolloids. For another, I'm ok with using some egg yolk, as long as I can't taste it.

 

Incidentally, I think you can come closer to Jenni's result by using nonfat dry milk than by reducing the milk with heat. The better nonfat dry milks are evaporated with a low-heat process, so you don't get that caramelized, condensed milk flavor.

Edited by paulraphael (log)

Notes from the underbelly

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Paul,

 

I think you are very likely to develop the cooked milk flavour, as well as the eggy hydrogen sulphide flavour, if you heat your mix to 79°C and hold it there for 2 hours. I found that my mix developed a cooked milk flavour when I heated it to around 73°C for 60 minutes. I wouldn't recommend going above about 72°C.

 

The sugar and total solids contents do indeed push up the temperature at which milk protein undergoes reversible unfolding. I haven't been able to measure the amount of irreversible denaturation that takes place but would love any information on this if you come across any.

 

All the best,

 

Ruben

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Ruben. 

 

With a little luck Jenni will tell me some more, or maybe point me to some of her sources. Some pastry chefs have the benefit of working directly with guys like Douglas Goff and Cesar Vega, so they get information that we might not be able to find online or in books.

 

In the mean time I think I'll do a taste test of different cook times and temperatures. Part of the issue is that cooked milk flavor is so subjective. Some people want it, some don't. So the real issue might be what milk flavor you personally prefer.

 

I'm not putting the highest priority on the functional properties of the milk proteins, since it's possible to get those elsewhere.

Edited by paulraphael (log)

Notes from the underbelly

Link to post
Share on other sites

So the real issue might be what milk flavor you personally prefer.

Not directly related to what's being discussed but, speaking of milk flavors, I tried the burnt milk gelato from Migoyas Frozen Desserts and that was a revelation. The word "burnt" in association with food is rarely an appealing thing. "Burnt" in association with milk elevates that lack of appeal even further... but the result was delicious. Probably now among my top 5 favorite flavors.

 

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Update.  This afternoon, after about seventeen hours of aging, I stirred in some vanilla paste and spun half the mixture.  It went sixteen minutes, though I had aimed for fifteen minutes and should have pulled it then.  At fifteen minutes it looked as hard as it was going to get.  I had the thermopen out to measure draw temperature but that didn't happen.

 

Had to try a bowl soft serve.  It was sweet enough.  It was as good as any I have had right out of the machine, but the proof is in the hardening.  

Link to post
Share on other sites

He says he just uses a stick blender after cooking the custard. Last he blogged about it (not that long ago) he didn't have a real homogenizer. 

I had originally misread this; I thought he blended it after aging, which is something I usually do to thin it enough so it can run through a strainer easily. But this probably has no homogenizing effect.

Notes from the underbelly

Link to post
Share on other sites

He says he just uses a stick blender after cooking the custard. Last he blogged about it (not that long ago) he didn't have a real homogenizer. 

I had originally misread this; I thought he blended it after aging, which is something I usually do to thin it enough so it can run through a strainer easily. But this probably has no homogenizing effect.

 

I've never tried straining the mix.  I figure after blending or homogenizing there is not that much left to strain.  Though I do take a look for egg shells before I whisk the yolks.

 

My batch has been hardening now for eight and a half hours.  Almost dinner time.  I can't decide what's for dinner besides ice cream and cake.

Link to post
Share on other sites

After ten and a half hours in the freezer, I tried it.  Nothing lacking, perfect yield stress, ideal sweetness, silky texture, pleasant meltdown, no defects.  I have not had better ice cream.  Still need to run it past my grandkids sensory panel...assuming I can actually reproduce the recipe.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Kind of looks like you could buy the rotostator and put on Bamix.

 

I've already searched for an attachment designed for it. No hits. BTW, in the homogenizer world, the rotor-stator is called a generator (don't ask me why).

 

Seems like homogenizers today are like immersion circulators were 5 years ago. Priced for the lab market. An attachment for a Bamix would an interesting project for someone with access to a CNC machine. Or maybe we can convince Anova to get to work ...

Notes from the underbelly

Link to post
Share on other sites

I've already searched for an attachment designed for it. No hits. BTW, in the homogenizer world, the rotor-stator is called a generator (don't ask me why).

 

Seems like homogenizers today are like immersion circulators were 5 years ago. Priced for the lab market. An attachment for a Bamix would an interesting project for someone with access to a CNC machine. Or maybe we can convince Anova to get to work ...

1.4 cm generator, 2.5 cm generator

Link to post
Share on other sites

The BioHomogenator uses a Bamix motor unit.  Whether or not the BioHomogenator generators are compatible with run of the mill (pun sort of intended) Bamix blenders I do not know.  You might try writing BioSpec to ask.  But since the cost is almost all in the generator, I'd say buy the complete BioHomogenator unit with warrantee unless you already have a Bamix.

 

BioSpec also sells the BioMixer, which as far as I can tell is a rebranded Bamix blender.  Or not really rebranded as the motors still say "Bamix".

 

BioSpec makes no secret that they use third party motors on their products.  The fact that the motors say Bamix is not necessarily a bad thing.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd be interested to know if there's an effect on final texture if you homogenize at the beginning of cooking rather than at the end. Maybe I can commission a batch.

 

Until I can afford a mixer that fits my precise heat mixer bowl I doubt I will be making this recipe much, unless there is an emergency.  I have achieved proof of concept.  But then what is rent and food?

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Until I can afford a mixer that fits my precise heat mixer bowl I doubt I will be making this recipe much, unless there is an emergency.  I have achieved proof of concept.  But then what is rent and food?

 

What's the advantage of the KA heat mixer bowl over a laboratory magnetic hot plate? I've seen ones with thermostats for under $200.

Notes from the underbelly

Link to post
Share on other sites

What's the advantage of the KA heat mixer bowl over a laboratory magnetic hot plate? I've seen ones with thermostats for under $200.

 

I suggested the idea of a temperature controlled stirring hot plate back in post #17.  The Corning one was close to $800.  When I bought the KitchenAid bowl I had hopes it would fit my old KitchenAid mixer, which would have made the combination quite cost effective, in my opinion.  Less so, perhaps, now that I would need to purchase a more modern mixer to work with it.

 

Besides, the bowl works nicely as a slow cooker, and (once I get a mixer) should work for dishes like risotto that are difficult on a stirring hot plate.  I could not foresee much culinary application for a hot plate besides ice cream and possibly hydrating hydrocolloids.

 

I also like that the bowl is light weight and induction heated.  It gets only slightly warm on the outside.  And there are other applications for a KitchenAid mixer.  Right now I think I shall go have some angel food cake and tea.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
  • Similar Content

    • By Kasia
      BANOFFE - MY DAUGHTER'S BIRTHDAY CAKE
       
      This year, mischievous nature tried to upset my daughter's birthday plans. Spending your birthday in bed with a thermometer isn't an excellent idea ¬– even for an adult. For a teenager it is a drama comparable to cancelled holidays. My daughter told me that you are thirteen only once. And she was right. Literally and figuratively.

      I wanted to sugar the pill for her on this day and cheer her up for a bit, so I prepared a caramel cake with bananas – banoffee in the form of a small birthday cake. My sweet magic and the dinner from her favourite restaurant worked, and in the end her birthday was quite nice.

      Ingredients (17cm cake tin):
      150g of biscuits
      75g of butter
      200ml of 30% sweet cream
      250g of mascarpone cheese
      2 tablespoons of caster sugar
      2 bananas
      300g of fudge
      1 teaspoon of dark cocoa

      Break the biscuits into very small pieces or blend them. Melt the butter and mix it up with the biscuits until you have dough like wet sand. Put it into a cake tin and form the base. It is worth rolling it flat with a glass. Leave it in the fridge for one hour. Spread the biscuit layer with fudge and arrange the sliced bananas on top. Whisk the chilled sweet cream with the caster sugar. Add the mascarpone cheese and mix it in. Put the mixture onto the bananas and make it even. Sprinkle with the dark cocoa and decorate as you like. Leave it in the fridge for a few hours (best for the whole night).

      Enjoy your meal!

    • By Kasia
      SWIFT HOMEMADE NAPOLEON
       
      Sometimes we have days – may there be as few as possible – when nothing works out. I can even burn the water for tea. I have two ways of dealing with such days. The first is to sit in a corner and wait it out – maybe it will sort itself out. I can only do this when I'm alone. When I have a hungry family I have to look for another way. My second way is to use only well-known recipes and stick to them irregardless of how well I know them. Any experiments in this situation will end in failure.

      Last weekend was just difficult. My husband helped me prepare dinner, but the dessert was my problem alone. Following the rules, I used a recipe for napoleon that is so simple there is no way you could fail. I recommend it to anyone struggling with creative impotence or who likes glamourous results after not too much effort in the kitchen.
       
      Ingredients (for 9 napoleons)
      1 pack of chilled French pastry
      500ml of milk
      6 tablespoons of sugar
      1 packet of powdered blancmange
      50g of butter
      2 egg yolks
      1 teaspoon of vanilla essence
      1 tablespoons of potato flour
      2 tablespoons of flour
      caster sugar

      Heat the oven up to 180C. Cover a baking tray with some baking paper.
      Cut the French pastry in half. Bake one half for 20 minutes. Remove it from the tray. Cut the second part into 9 squares. A cake prepared in this way is easier to divide into portions. Put them on the paper and bake for 20 minutes.
      Now prepare the crème. Boil 400ml of the milk with the sugar, vanilla essence and butter. Mix the rest of the milk with the powdered blancmange, flour and potato flour and egg yolks. When the milk has boiled, take it off the heat and add it to the mixture, stirring constantly. Put it on the heat and boil, stirring until the mixture is coagulated. Take the pot off the heat. Put the warm mixture on the whole part of the French pasty and then cover it with the sliced part of the pastry. Cover the dessert with aluminium foil and leave in the fridge for a few hours. Cut and sprinkle with the caster sugar before serving.
       
       

    • By Kasia
      ORANGE CREME BRULEE WITH MILLET GROATS
       
      One of our friends said recently that he doesn't cook for himself. He eats what his wife prepares: sometimes it is something healthy and other times something yummy. It was a joke, of course, because his wife cooks really well, but this sentence is now in our friendly canon of jokes.

      Inspired by our talk about groats, flakes and healthy food, I prepared a dessert which combines excellent taste and healthy ingredients. The original recipe comes from the Lidl cookery book. I would like to share with you my version of this dish. I recommend Crème brûlée with millet groats to everybody who counts calories. It is mild, not too sweet, wonderfully creamy inside and with an incredible crunchy crust on top. That's why we love crème brûlée, don't we? I prepared a cranberry-orange preserve to offset the sweetness of the dessert. The whole dessert looked beautiful and tasted perfect.
       
      Ingredients (for 4 people)
      crème brûlée
      100g of dry millet groats
      350ml of almond milk
      1 teaspoon of vanilla essence
      2-3 tablespoons of brown sugar (3 additional tablespoons for the sugar crust)
      juice and skin from one orange
       
      confiture:
      150g of fresh cranberries
      juice and peel from one orange
      4 tablespoons of brown sugar

      Put the millet groats in a sifter, clean them with cold water and then douse them with hot water. Put the groats, almond milk, sugar and vanilla essence into a saucepan with a heavy bottom. Boil it with the lid on without stirring for 15-18 minutes until the liquid has evaporated. Leave to cool down. Add the orange juice and peel, mix it in and blend until the mixture is perfectly smooth. Put the dessert into small bowls and leave in the fridge for one hour. Wash the cranberries. Add the orange juice and peel and the sugar and boil for 10-15 minutes. Try it and add some sugar if you think the dessert is too sour. Take out the bowls from the fridge. Sprinkle them with the sugar and burn it with a small kitchen burner to make a crunchy caramel crust. Decorate the dessert with a small teaspoon of the cranberry preserve. Serve the rest of the preserve separately in small dishes.
       
       


    • By Kasia
      ON THE CHRISTMAS TABLE - CHRISTMAS EVE CRANBERRY KISSEL
       
      One of my friends from Ukraine told me about her traditional Christmas dishes. Except for stuffed cabbage with potatoes (which I have made already) I was surprised about cranberry kissel. I searched the Internet and I saw that in many Polish homes Christmas Eve supper ends with cranberry kissel. In my home we always drink compote with dried fruit, but maybe this year we will try a new dish on our Christmas menu.

      I wonder why cranberries are on the Christmas table. I didn't find any particular information about it (except the fact it is tradition). I think that a few years ago cranberries were treated as a natural cure which aids digestion, and this could be quite useful after a hefty Christmas meal!

      At my Ukrainian friends' home Christmas kissel is runny like a drink, but you can prepare it like a dessert with a more dense texture. I made the drink version, but you should choose which is better for you.

      Ingredients:
      500g of cranberries
      a piece of cinnamon and a couple of cloves
      6-8 tablespoons of sugar
      2-3 tablespoons of potato flour

      Wash the cranberries and put them with the cinnamon and cloves in a pan. Pour in 500ml of water and boil until the fruit is soft. Remove the cinnamon and cloves and blend the rest. Add the sugar and mix it until it has dissolved. Sieve the cranberry mousse to make a smooth texture. Mix the potato flour with a bit of cold water. Boil the cranberry mousse and add the mixed potato flour, stirring constantly so it is not lumpy. Boil for a while. Pour the kissel into some glasses.

      Enjoy your meal!

    • By Kasia
      CRANBERRY-APPLE CAKE
       
      The worst thing about my cranberry-apple cake is the way it looks. It didn't look impressive, but it was so yummy it disappeared from the baking pan before it had completely cooled down. My children said that it was a colourful apple pie, and it really was something like that. Apples with cinnamon are the basis of apple pie – one of my favourite cakes. However, the sour cranberries make it more fresh and interesting. The crumble topping was, for my son, the most important part of the cake. I had to drive him away, because otherwise the cake would have been deprived of its crunchy top.

      Ingredients (18×26cm cake tin ):
      dough
      200g of flour
      150g of butter
      3 eggs
      1 packet of powdered vanilla blancmange
      1 teaspoon of vanilla essence
      200g of sugar
      1 teaspoon of baking powder
      pinch of salt
      fruit
      250g of fresh cranberries
      1 apple
      3 tablespoons of brown sugar
      1 teaspoon of cinnamon
      crumble topping
      5 tablespoons of brown sugar
      100g of butter
      150g of flour
       
      First make the crumble topping. Put the cool butter, flour and sugar in a bowl. Knead them until you have small lumps. Leave it in the fridge.
      Heat the oven up to 180C. Cover a cake tin with some baking paper.
      Mix the flour with the baking powder and salt. Cream the butter with the sugar. Add egg after egg to the butter, stirring constantly. Add the flour, vanilla essence and powdered vanilla blancmange. Mix it together until you have a smooth dough. Put the dough into the cake tin. Wash the apple, remove the apple core and cube it. Mix the cranberries, apple, sugar and cinnamon in a bowl. Put the fruit on top of the dough. Cover the fruit with the crumble topping. Bake for 50 minutes.

      Enjoy your meal!

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...