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Derek J

Reseasoning cast iron, flaxseed v. grapeseed oil

30 posts in this topic

I'm planning to reseason a couple cast iron pans. Cooks Illustrated had a note a year or so ago about how to do this by applying repeated coats of flaxseed oil and baking at high temperatures. I am having trouble finding flaxseed oil, but I can get grapeseed oil. Does anyone know if substituting grapeseed oil for flaxseed oil in this process is viable?

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If you have a decent health food store in your area, they're sure to have flax seed oil. Whole Foods might also have it...


So we finish the eighteenth and he's gonna stiff me. And I say, "Hey, Lama, hey, how about a little something, you know, for the effort, you know." And he says, "Oh, uh, there won't be any money. But when you die, on your deathbed, you will receive total consciousness."

So I got that goin' for me, which is nice.

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We don't have a Whole Foods, but we do have a nice hippie place with lots of grains and granolas and whatnot. I hadn't thought of checking there. Thanks for the kick in the right direction!

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FYI, it won't be with the other cooking oils. It's be with supplements, in a refrigerator case. Probably simplest to ask.

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I've used grape seed oil with no problem at all, find it less gummy than the available flax seed oil (and more reasonably priced). In a pinch I've used all sorts of things (rather than leave the bare iron vulnerable and exposed; an oil that gums is a drag, but can be removed, unlike the pits caused by rusting).


Michaela, aka "Mjx"
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mscioscia@egstaff.org

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as Mjx says. go with grape seed flax has all sorts of bits in it that will probably burn and cause the gummyness.

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Actually flax seed oil is felt to be one of the best because of it's tendency to oxidize more easily than other oils. You want to put as thin a layer down as you can before each heating - but I've used it to get fabulous results on cast iron and steel.

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interesting. guess oxidizing in this case is good. generally its bad!

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Flax seed oil is a 'drying oil', meaning it can polymerize into a tough solid and resilient form.

That's what makes it best for seasoning cast iron.

Poppy seed oil and walnut oil are a couple other 'drying oils'.

~Martin


Edited by DiggingDogFarm (log)

~Martin

Unsupervised rebellious radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, self-reliant homesteader and adventurous cook. Crotchety cantankerous terse curmudgeon, nonconformist, contrarian and natural born skeptic who questions everything!

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it! 

 

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FYI, it won't be with the other cooking oils. It's be with supplements, in a refrigerator case. Probably simplest to ask.

Exactly. I found an organic variety at Walmart supermarket in the supplement section. A little goes a long way. It's been the best seasoning I've done on my pans. I used a method outlined by Sheryl Canter

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if one were to get one of those newer Lodge 'pre-seasoned' pans: would the next layers of flax stick to what's there?

its probably better to get a non-seasoned one and go from there.

thanks

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Yes, it'll stick to what's there, but as you said, it's best to get an unseasoned pan and start from there.

In my experience, whatever Lodge is using for seasoning doesn't hold-up well.

~Martin


~Martin

Unsupervised rebellious radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, self-reliant homesteader and adventurous cook. Crotchety cantankerous terse curmudgeon, nonconformist, contrarian and natural born skeptic who questions everything!

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it! 

 

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I got a Lodge pre seasoned, removed the seasoning via a self cleaning oven and then re-seasoned. Better to take it down to the bare iron then try to season over a less than stellar seasoning

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FYI, it won't be with the other cooking oils. It's be with supplements, in a refrigerator case. Probably simplest to ask.

I wish I'd read your post before going to the hippie store. I was filled with despair when I found every kind of oil imaginable except for flax seed. They had macadamia oil, walnut oil, almond oil, safflower oil, apricot kernel oil, rice bran oil, avocado oil, and even (I kid you not) something called "olive oil for children." Fortunately, the friendly lady at the checkout register pointed me toward the refrigerated foods section and I got my flax seed oil.

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I got a Lodge pre seasoned, removed the seasoning via a self cleaning oven and then re-seasoned. Better to take it down to the bare iron then try to season over a less than stellar seasoning

That's where I'm at. I bought 2 Lodge cast iron pans and the seasoning failed fairly epicly with both. I cooked a hamburger in a brand new one and it stuck to the pan so badly that scrubbing off the meat residue took off the seasoning. My project this week is stripping off the remaining seasoning from both pans and reseasoning with flax seed oil. I baked the first coat this morning. I should be able to do 2 coats per day until I'm done.

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Id love to see a pic of your final pans!

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Here are a couple of mine. The skillet is a Lodge which was taken to bare iron and reseasoned. The comal was an old one that didn't have a good seasoning. It was also taken down to bare metal and reseasoned at the same timeImageUploadedByTapatalk1356916048.844292.jpg

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I bought a large Lodge pre-seasoned frying pan some years ago, and all has gone well. So I thought I knew what I was doing. But I recently bought a little cephalon cast iron pan and am having trouble - black stuff keeps coming off the interior. When I wipe it with a paper towel the towel turns black. There seems to be no end of black stuff, like I could wipe forever and still get black. Is this the "preseasoning" coming off? Should I just nuke it in the oven?

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I think the black is iron, but others will know more. try several layers of new seasoning and see it that changes.

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I think the black is iron, but others will know more. try several layers of new seasoning and see it that changes.
You were right. Thanks!

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Here is the article that explains it nicely.

Thanks for that link, Kerry. It's an excellent article and fascinating reading! I learned a lot from it.


Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
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I don't wish to present myself as a no-brain Luddite though I might be. The magic seasoning ingredient is bacon fat, really. Cast iron, preseasoned or raw , can be stick free if you cook two batches of bacon and clean it gently -- no steel wool.


Margaret McArthur

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1912-2008

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The magic seasoning ingredient is bacon fat, really.

I used to think the same thing, until I tried the drying oils.

Bacon fat will certainly work, but it doesn't produce the very tough resilient seasoning of a drying oil.

~Martin


~Martin

Unsupervised rebellious radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, self-reliant homesteader and adventurous cook. Crotchety cantankerous terse curmudgeon, nonconformist, contrarian and natural born skeptic who questions everything!

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it! 

 

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