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Jason Perlow

Rancilio Silvia and PIDs

110 posts in this topic

An interesting article on the effect of brewing temperatures on extraction and taste can be found here. Interesting that 95C is right in the middle of the temperatures that were trialled (92, 94, 96, 98).


Edited by nickrey (log)

Nick Reynolds, aka "nickrey"

"My doctor told me to stop having intimate dinners for four.
Unless there are three other people." Orson Welles
My eG Foodblog

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But aren't you brewing at 62C (based on the temperature of the water coming out of the portafilter)? I'd expect you to want to have it hitting the grounds at 95C, not coming out of the boiler at 95C, right? That's what I brew pour-over at.


Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

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Of course it is was 95C -- yesterday I put it in a cold cup which cooled the water before I measured its temperature. After pouring a number of shots to warm the cup before measuring, it read 95C. 


Nick Reynolds, aka "nickrey"

"My doctor told me to stop having intimate dinners for four.
Unless there are three other people." Orson Welles
My eG Foodblog

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It's attached to the outside of the brass boiler as per the instructions.

 

The result with the cold cup really highlights the need to warm cups before pouring.


Nick Reynolds, aka "nickrey"

"My doctor told me to stop having intimate dinners for four.
Unless there are three other people." Orson Welles
My eG Foodblog

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Pouring multiple shots presumably also had the effect of warming the internal plumbing: do you typically discard your first couple of shots so you are starting with a hot machine?


Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

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On the basis of experience and recommendations on coffee forums, I leave it for at least 20-30 minutes. I turn mine on when waking up and it is well and truly ready to go when I'm making breakfast.


Nick Reynolds, aka "nickrey"

"My doctor told me to stop having intimate dinners for four.
Unless there are three other people." Orson Welles
My eG Foodblog

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I'll add that it  is like preheating an oven with a heat sink in it (or, as in my case, a Baking Steel). I heat the oven for a good 45 minutes.  Silvia can get heated up nicely in 30 - what I do is generally run it through a cycle or two as it's warming up without any coffee...I run through both the portafilter and steam wand...that will drop the temp so the boiler fires up again. And, it's only water.


Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

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On December 20, 2015 at 0:47 AM, nickrey said:

On the basis of experience and recommendations on coffee forums, I leave it for at least 20-30 minutes. I turn mine on when waking up and it is well and truly ready to go when I'm making breakfast.

 

I have my Silvia on an electronic timer, a WeMo plug, but there are many on the market including very cheap electromechanical ones. I have it set for 6am to 7pm, and override it during the weekends.

 


Jason Perlow

Co-Founder, The Society for Culinary Arts & Letters

offthebroiler.com - Food Blog | View my food photos on Instagram

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