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Chocolates with that Showroom Finish, 2012 –


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Okay, so although it is past midnight here...

You can use any contrasting colors. I prefer natural, but anything will work. Two methods:

1. In the bowl of chocolate that you are using to dip in, pipe in contrasting chocolate in swirls, lines, circles etc (the more you practice,the more you can get the specific effect you want). Then dip your piece into this, making sure to "grab" the contrasting color as you lift the piece out. When you do what you typically do to get the extra chocolate off, the desired effect settles in. If you are dipping in a machine like chocovision,for ex. as the bowl turns, the piped chocolate gets swirled and then you dip while this is happening... Play around...

2. Best to work with someone,but possible all alone. As you remove the piece from being dipped, before scraping/tapping etc the extra chocolate off, pipe contrasting choc onto the piece and then tap/scrape etc the excess off. DOing circles inside circles and then quickly fethering with a toothpick, and then tapping the excess off, makes a great design. Again, play around!

Have fun! I would love to see your pictures!

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I saw that on the cover of the 2nd edition of chocolates and confections

http://www.amazon.com/Chocolates-Confections-Formula-Technique-Confectioner/dp/0470424419

Its a cool look. I dont work with chocolate much, in fact I try not too as much as possible, I hate tempering the stuff, I can never seem to hit it spot on. But out of my own curiosity, what do you do with the chocolate after your done? Would you mix it all together and use it for a ganache? Would you still use it with a polycarbonate mold? I'm asking because, like on the cover of the book above, if you mix dark and white, would it not change the way it needs to be tempered? Or am I just overthinking things?

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minas6907,hi! The picture on the cover of what you posted is not exactly the same method. When using a maching with an attached conveyor belt by which the chocoalte undergoes coating and vibrating the effect is quite easily attained. When dipping you dont have to use a huge bowl/amount of chocolate and the piping contasting color onto the chocolate is actually not a lot of chocolate at all. Using milk and adding dark doesnt change it too much and is often something I do in no connection to dipping effects, but for color, flavor etc. If this goes back into a larger pool of chocolate after use, it is mostly undetectable and certainly has never been noticed by others or self in a negative way. If strong contrasting colors are used, like purple onto white chocolate, well then, use a small bowl...??

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minas6907,hi! The picture on the cover of what you posted is not exactly the same method. When using a maching with an attached conveyor belt by which the chocoalte undergoes coating and vibrating the effect is quite easily attained. When dipping you dont have to use a huge bowl/amount of chocolate and the piping contasting color onto the chocolate is actually not a lot of chocolate at all. Using milk and adding dark doesnt change it too much and is often something I do in no connection to dipping effects, but for color, flavor etc. If this goes back into a larger pool of chocolate after use, it is mostly undetectable and certainly has never been noticed by others or self in a negative way. If strong contrasting colors are used, like purple onto white chocolate, well then, use a small bowl...??

I suppose if you were using purple chocolate - you could dip the item, then while it is still on the dipping fork, drizzle with the purple (second person would help), then tap and scrape over an empty bowl to get the colours to meld.

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 4 weeks later...

maybe not quite showroom, but the best I can manage...

544831_170865686374647_376596475_n.jpg

574672_148873528573863_2080469641_n.jpg

574672_148873531907196_658270285_n.jpg

Those are beautiful. I'd sell those! I especially like the "egg". What are the flavors? Is the 3 layer piece "Trifection"?

Steve Lebowitz

Doer of All Things

Steven Howard Confections

Slicing a warm slab of bacon is a lot like giving a ferret a shave. No matter how careful you are, somebody's going to get hurt - Alton Brown, "Good Eats"

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Thank you... probably should have remembered to put flavours in the post! :) The three layer piece is called "Tendre Praline" from Kirsten Tiballs' Savour School, I had a raspberry ganache in the egg and the ladybug was just a solid piece. I was quite proud of the eggs, that was the first time I'd worked with colour out of the classroom!

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  • 3 weeks later...
  • 2 weeks later...

Is the 3 layer piece "Trifection"?

ah, I've found the recipe you're referring to in Chocolates & Confections. No, the recipe used is similar, but uses almond praline paste and pure hazelnut paste. I use commercially available pastes and as a result, the finished product is very smooth, with no graininess that I get when I prepare my own praline pastes.

cheers

Chris

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Personal best for the first post here.

White chocolate and freeze dried raspberry powder

2m9N4.jpg

I love it! Did you just add raspberry powder to white chocolate to get that effect? The 'speckles' look too perfectly spaced for that... care to share your secret? :)

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I love it! Did you just add raspberry powder to white chocolate to get that effect? The 'speckles' look too perfectly spaced for that... care to share your secret? :)

Thanks. It is melted white chocolate and 2% freeze dried raspberry powder. I used one from http://fresh-as.com/index.html. Powder melts only partially in the chocolate, producing this effect.

Similar one with ground coffee:

xolSu.jpg

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I love it! Did you just add raspberry powder to white chocolate to get that effect? The 'speckles' look too perfectly spaced for that... care to share your secret? :)

Thanks. It is melted white chocolate and 2% freeze dried raspberry powder. I used one from http://fresh-as.com/index.html. Powder melts only partially in the chocolate, producing this effect.

Similar one with ground coffee:

xolSu.jpg

Thanks! What a great way to speckle - and add flavour :)

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First time posting any of my work.

Those are white shell chocolates with fresh ginger, key lime, candied orange and a bit of Limoncello liquor infused in a dark chocolate ganache.

Decoration is a spraying of cocoa butter over the frozen chocolates. It creates that velvety look.

Cheers!

KCcUh.jpg

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