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punk patissier

Chocolates with that Showroom Finish, 2012 –

485 posts in this topic

First time posting any of my work.

Those are white shell chocolates with fresh ginger, key lime, candied orange and a bit of Limoncello liquor infused in a dark chocolate ganache.

Decoration is a spraying of cocoa butter over the frozen chocolates. It creates that velvety look.

Cheers!

KCcUh.jpg

Very Cool! (pun intended) :smile:

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First time posting any of my work.

Those are white shell chocolates with fresh ginger, key lime, candied orange and a bit of Limoncello liquor infused in a dark chocolate ganache.

Decoration is a spraying of cocoa butter over the frozen chocolates. It creates that velvety look.

Cheers!

KCcUh.jpg

Very Cool! (pun intended) :smile:

Those are really beautiful. Have you used this decorating technique before? How does it hold up over time?


Steve Lebowitz

Doer of All Things

Steven Howard Confections

Slicing a warm slab of bacon is a lot like giving a ferret a shave. No matter how careful you are, somebody's going to get hurt - Alton Brown, "Good Eats"

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I've used the same technique in the past, it looks great until warm fingers touch them and the "flocking" melts leaving finger prints, or at least that's what's happened to mine.


Sian

"You can't buy happiness, but you can buy chocolate, and that's kinda the same thing really."

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I've used the same technique in the past, it looks great until warm fingers touch them and the "flocking" melts leaving finger prints, or at least that's what's happened to mine.

Could they be served in paper wrapper to avoid touching them with fingers?

I love yours Salted Muscovado truffles, how did you achieve that effect, if it is not secret?

I was experimenting with big demisphere moulds and aerated chocolate, this is result:

Y2Drf.jpg

YgGK9.jpg

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I've used the same technique in the past, it looks great until warm fingers touch them and the "flocking" melts leaving finger prints, or at least that's what's happened to mine.

Could they be served in paper wrapper to avoid touching them with fingers?

I love yours Salted Muscovado truffles, how did you achieve that effect, if it is not secret?

I was experimenting with big demisphere moulds and aerated chocolate, this is result:

Y2Drf.jpg

YgGK9.jpg

Simply a case of playing with the airbrush and (in this case the tines of a fork) to get a large spatter pattern before casting as usual. One of the benefits of playing with colour is it's fun! It doesn't matter if it doesn't come out how you wanted as you don't have to mould until you're happy.


Sian

"You can't buy happiness, but you can buy chocolate, and that's kinda the same thing really."

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strawberry_and_balsamic_daddy.jpg

muscovado_truffle_daddy.jpg

Again, as with Justin's moulds, these are large 7cm moulds.


Sian

"You can't buy happiness, but you can buy chocolate, and that's kinda the same thing really."

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I've used the same technique in the past, it looks great until warm fingers touch them and the "flocking" melts leaving finger prints, or at least that's what's happened to mine.

Could they be served in paper wrapper to avoid touching them with fingers?

I love yours Salted Muscovado truffles, how did you achieve that effect, if it is not secret?

I was experimenting with big demisphere moulds and aerated chocolate, this is result:

Y2Drf.jpg

YgGK9.jpg

Aerated! Is that aerated chocolate or aerated ganache? Some time ago I started a thread to figure out how to do a mousse ganache that resembled the ones I had at La Maison du Chocolat and Patrick Rogers when I was in Paris. So light and airy! The answers I got were whip the ganache when cool (poor shelf life life this way as it collapses) or use a frappe. There are no frappe ingredients on the ingredients list of the ones mentioned. I kept one of the maison du chocolat mousse ganache chocolates for months and it held up without collapsing. Anyways, after all that ramble... if you're doing an aerated ganache, how are you going about it? I would love to perfect this type of ganache...

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Aerated! Is that aerated chocolate or aerated ganache? Some time ago I started a thread to figure out how to do a mousse ganache that resembled the ones I had at La Maison du Chocolat and Patrick Rogers when I was in Paris. So light and airy! The answers I got were whip the ganache when cool (poor shelf life life this way as it collapses) or use a frappe. There are no frappe ingredients on the ingredients list of the ones mentioned. I kept one of the maison du chocolat mousse ganache chocolates for months and it held up without collapsing. Anyways, after all that ramble... if you're doing an aerated ganache, how are you going about it? I would love to perfect this type of ganache...

What were the ingredients listed?

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What were the ingredients listed?

I got the ingredients off of the 'maison' website. It's a boxed assortment ingredients list but you'll see there's no egg product or gelatin... This assortment includes the caramel mousse and the milk chocolate/hazelnut mousse. It was the caramel mousse that enthralled me - both theirs and Patrick Rogers. Stupidly good and sooooo light.

"Dark chocolate, milk chocolate, cream, sugar, butter, hazelnuts, almonds, invert sugar, fruits pulps, mint, orange extract, whole milk powder, glucose syrup, alcohol, citrus fruits rinds (orange, lemon), sweeteners (maltitol, sorbitol), colors : E100 curcumin, E160c paprika"

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First time posting any of my work.

Those are white shell chocolates with fresh ginger, key lime, candied orange and a bit of Limoncello liquor infused in a dark chocolate ganache.

Decoration is a spraying of cocoa butter over the frozen chocolates. It creates that velvety look.

Cheers!

KCcUh.jpg

Those are really beautiful. Have you used this decorating technique before? How does it hold up over time?

Hello lebowits!

You actually let them dry for 24 hours (I prefer 48 hours) at room temp (18-20°C) and can be manipulated normally after that.

It is a really beautiful technique to use, but the only downside is that you need to let them dry at least 1 day.

Cheers!

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First time posting any of my work.

Those are white shell chocolates with fresh ginger, key lime, candied orange and a bit of Limoncello liquor infused in a dark chocolate ganache.

Decoration is a spraying of cocoa butter over the frozen chocolates. It creates that velvety look.

Cheers!

KCcUh.jpg

Those are really beautiful. Have you used this decorating technique before? How does it hold up over time?

Hello lebowits!

You actually let them dry for 24 hours (I prefer 48 hours) at room temp (18-20°C) and can be manipulated normally after that.

It is a really beautiful technique to use, but the only downside is that you need to let them dry at least 1 day.

Cheers!

Thanks for the tip! I didn't know that!


JB Chocolatier

www.jbchocolatier.com

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Here are some I just finished putting together. Top left is a Red Wine truffle; Top right is a a Hot Chili infused truffle I call Fire and Ice; bottom left is Guinness and bottom right is a variation of a "Hella" (Wyabau) caramel, chocolate and xtabentunTasteTV Entry September 2012.jpg

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Gorgeous as always, Bob! I'd love to hear more about the techniques you used, especially the blue one and the orange/yellow/red.

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Tikidoc - most of my "technique" is airbrushing - Fire and Ice is three colors blended together - the Hella is splattered cocoa butter, a solid color (airbrushed) and then both are backed with white cocoa butter - I burned up my cheap airbrush in the middle of the work and had to go buy another - I upgraded to "not as cheap" airbrush...

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Here are some I just finished putting together. Top left is a Red Wine truffle; Top right is a a Hot Chili infused truffle I call Fire and Ice; bottom left is Guinness and bottom right is a variation of a "Hella" (Wyabau) caramel, chocolate and xtabentun

Wow, they look amazing! Are you using Chef Rubber colours?

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DianaM - yes, all the colors are Chef Rubber -

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76560_230287333765815_2107302828_n.jpg

Lime from "Chocolate to Savour" by Kirsten Tibballs, released recently. I shall be making plenty from this book.

Chris

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76560_230287333765815_2107302828_n.jpg

Lime from "Chocolate to Savour" by Kirsten Tibballs, released recently. I shall be making plenty from this book.

Chris

Gorgeous!!! How did you get that effect? I looked for the book on Amazon and it says it is out of print. Where did you get the book?

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tyvm :) I applied a streak of tempered green cocoa butter with my finger, when that was set, brushed in gold metallic, then a streak of white over the green, when that was set, created the dark shell. I got the book direct from the school that the author runs here in Melbourne - pre-ordered for a discount :D

cheers

Chris

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Very nice, Chris!

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beautiful chocolates keychris. How did you like the flavor of the piece? What are you using for the lime flavor (just juice?)?

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thanks all! Curls, I used Boiron (? spelling) frozen puree, plus zest :)

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Lime from "Chocolate to Savour" by Kirsten Tibballs, released recently. I shall be making plenty from this book.

Chris

Your mould painting technique is beautiful, and those chocolates look like gems. Really beautiful, keychris!

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