• Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Bombdog

Curing and Cooking with Ruhlman & Polcyn's "Charcuterie" (Part 4)

600 posts in this topic

My only real complaint is, in spite of what the pics show, that the fish was a bit drier than I am used to.  Lox, as I know it, is much oilier.  I attribute this to the use of curing salt but I'm not sure that's accurate.  What I do know is that the fish's texture changed very little after it had been smoked.  After 36 hours of curing, it was much stiffer than I am used to when I make gravlax, which contains only Kosher salt.  Next time out, I will almost certainly omit the pink salt and see how it affects the final product.

=R=

I have not used the curing salt and the mosture seems fine. I have found that whenever I make the gravelox - a couple of days in the fridge - esp in a food saver package - helps the texture immensely - frankly seems to get better after a week or two. The dry edge and the more wet middle seem to have a little osmosis going on...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
So here we all are making and eating salted, smokey pork fat to our hearts content...

So last week  - Well - I went to the doc for a check-up....

He freaked - BP way high, cholesterol high, blood sugar high...weight up.....

Interesting. I've had just the opposite happen to me. I've lost just a tad over 60 lbs in the past 11 months. My b/p is down and my cholesteral has dropped so much my Dr removed me from the meds.

I admit to a pretty aggressive work out regimen, but I eat ALOT of my own stuff, nearly every day.

Interestingly, I too am quite active - daily excersie regimen - however there is only so much Na2 that my body can process....

Getting older doesn't help either....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Getting older doesn't help either....

Rub it in, will ya? That's exactly what caused me to lose 60 lbs!

Just to keep us on topic. I just finished stuffing 13 lbs of sopressata. It's in the oven to inoculate as we speak.

No doubt, this is my favorite of all the cured salami I've made. But, even with the Grizzly, this is a labor of love. Dicing all that pork and fat by hand is a CHORE!


Dave Valentin

Retired Explosive Detection K9 Handler

"So, what if we've got it all backwards?" asks my son.

"Got what backwards?" I ask.

"What if chicken tastes like rattlesnake?" My son, the Einstein of the family.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Is the soppressata from the book? What size casing did you use?

And yes, dicing meat and fat is a lot of flippin' work.

Yep, right there on page 186. I'm using beef middles.


Dave Valentin

Retired Explosive Detection K9 Handler

"So, what if we've got it all backwards?" asks my son.

"Got what backwards?" I ask.

"What if chicken tastes like rattlesnake?" My son, the Einstein of the family.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

interesting notes on blood pressure etc. mine went down after working on the book, both bp and cholesterol. i think that if we eat natural foods our body helps us to regulate what we need and what we don't. we're super sensitive to salt concentration when it's not in soda and lean cuisines, so when we gorge on bacon, we eat less salt the next day. cholesterol, i don't know. i just suspect pork fat isn't as bad as other animal fats, especially when combined with a diet low in processed food.

ron, the reason for pink salt in smoked salmon is to prevent botulism, which can grow on the outside of the salmon in a smokey warm environment. it doesn't have anything to do with dryness. i'll bet that comes from curing a really good lean wild fish--which requires considerably less time on the cure than grocery store salmon. because it doesn't affect flavor much, i'd leave the pink salt but cut down on the cure time.


Edited by Michael Ruhlman (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ron, the reason for pink salt in smoked salmon is to prevent botulism, which can grow on the outside of the salmon in a smoky warm environment.  it doesn't have anything to do with dryness.  i'll bet that comes from curing a really good lean wild fish--which requires considerably less time on the cure than grocery store salmon.  because it doesn't affect flavor much, i'd leave the pink salt but cut down on the cure time.

Gotcha. Thanks for the input, Michael. Coho is somewhat lean but it was definitely the 'best available' at the time. I'll cut it back to 24 hours of curing next time around and see what goes. The piece of salmon from Costco was so much smaller, comparing the results (on that level) is probably not relevant.

I too just had a physical and while the results weren't fantastic, my bp and cholesterol were both lower than at my last visit to the doc.

FWIW, I didn't mention my new hobby :wink:

=R=


"Hey, hey, careful man! There's a beverage here!" --The Dude, The Big Lebowski

LTHForum.com -- The definitive Chicago-based culinary chat site

ronnie_suburban 'at' yahoo.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Getting older doesn't help either....

Rub it in, will ya? That's exactly what caused me to lose 60 lbs!

Just to keep us on topic. I just finished stuffing 13 lbs of sopressata. It's in the oven to inoculate as we speak.

No doubt, this is my favorite of all the cured salami I've made. But, even with the Grizzly, this is a labor of love. Dicing all that pork and fat by hand is a CHORE!

Yum!! What kind of casings? I just bought some beef casings to try and make some bigger salamis...

... and I can't disagree on the labor of cutting up all the meat by hand...

... is there such thing as a meat cuber? (kidding..)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
interesting notes on blood pressure etc.  mine went down after working on the book, both bp and cholesterol.  i think that if we eat natural foods our body helps us to regulate what we need and what we don't.  we're super sensitive to salt concentration when it's not in soda and lean cuisines, so when we gorge on bacon, we eat less salt the next day.  cholesterol, i don't know.  i just suspect pork fat isn't as bad as other animal fats, especially when combined with a diet low in processed food.

Huh - that is 3 of you. I guess I should examine other parts of my diet - I assumed it was the salt pork and fat... though I am not one to eat alot of processed foods, I will eat my fair share from time to time.


Edited by mdbasile (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Huh - that is 3 of you. I guess I should examine other parts of my diet - I assumed it was the salt pork and fat... though I am not one to eat alot of processed foods, I will eat my fair share from time to time.

Beef middles, Mark.

As Michael mentioned...the processed foods might be the kicker. I pretty much do not eat ANY processed foods. I realize that some slip in on a rare occasion. But I'm pretty hard on myself about that.

Edited to add:

Wow, Charcuterie as health food! Who'd a thunk it!


Edited by Bombdog (log)

Dave Valentin

Retired Explosive Detection K9 Handler

"So, what if we've got it all backwards?" asks my son.

"Got what backwards?" I ask.

"What if chicken tastes like rattlesnake?" My son, the Einstein of the family.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Huh - that is 3 of you. I guess I should examine other parts of my diet - I assumed it was the salt pork and fat... though I am not one to eat alot of processed foods, I will eat my fair share from time to time.

Beef middles, Mark.

As Michael mentioned...the processed foods might be the kicker. I pretty much do not eat ANY processed foods. I realize that some slip in on a rare occasion. But I'm pretty hard on myself about that.

Edited to add:

Wow, Charcuterie as health food! Who'd a thunk it!

How many links from the 13 lbs? - photos to come I assume...

I will obviously need to work on the purity of my foods...

I raise a glass to the new health food!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would like to have your thoughts on the pros and cons of injecting brine in larger pieces of meats, like turkey breasts and ham. There is no mention of injecting brine in 'Charcuterie'. Does it change the texture of the finished product?

At first glance, it seems that it would be a good technique.

Injecting brine will of course have quite an influence on brining time. Any guidelines?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Everyone,

First off, I've got to admit that I've been lurking in this thread for quite some time and am just now posting for the first time.

My only real projects from the book so far have been bacon and fresh sausages, both of which have been fantastic revelations in home-processed porky goodness. Just recently (past week or so), I've built a small curing chamber out of a tall dorm fridge. By modifying the interior a bit, I've been able to stabilize the temperature to right at 60F, and have a remote thermo/hygro sensor in there just to keep an eye on things. This past Sunday, I rolled up and hung a pancetta, and am patiently (read: taking progress photos every 24 hours and comparing) awaiting the results.

So, here's my question. The hot-smoked items calls for pink salt (nitrite), which makes perfect sense. Salamis call for cure #2 (nitrate), which also makes sense. Now, here's where I'm confused: the pancetta (to be hung for a long period and not heated in to the unsafe food zone) uses pink salt, and the cured ham calls for no curing salt. What's the scoop?

Jmolinari and others talk about hanging pancetta for months at a time. Are you guys using the curing salt #2/nitrate as a substitution?

I just feel like I'm missing something. Maybe it's obvious, but I just can't seem to figure it out.

Thanks,

-Dan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dan, welcome! Glad we enticed you over here. I can't answer you questions, but will make a request. Can you give us more details on your fridge and the modifications you made? Photos and instructions, please?


Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How many links from the 13 lbs? - photos to come I assume...

I will obviously need to work on the purity of my foods...

I raise a glass to the new health food!!

Mark, I make some pretty large sticks, about 12". I think I got 10 from this batch. I'll get a picture tomorrow when I remove them to hang.


Dave Valentin

Retired Explosive Detection K9 Handler

"So, what if we've got it all backwards?" asks my son.

"Got what backwards?" I ask.

"What if chicken tastes like rattlesnake?" My son, the Einstein of the family.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dan, welcome!  Glad we enticed you over here.

Glad to be here! I may have come to the party late, but I plan on making up for lost time...

I can't answer you questions, but will make a request.  Can you give us more details on your fridge and the modifications you made?  Photos and instructions, please?

Sure thing. Here you'll see my very sophisticated modifications of foil and masking tape (fwiw, I plan on upgrading to duct tape soonly).

Bascially, I just wanted to box in the coil with the fridge's temp sensor... It was working a bit too well and staying too warm, so I up'd the fridge's setting from the absolute lowest, to just a bit higher.

gallery_27805_3593_14745.jpg

Cheers,

-Dan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok, yet another reason I should keep my copy of On Food and Cooking on hand at all times. Harold McGee has a nice sidebar (page 174) on the "Enigma of Hams Cured Without Nitrite". To summarize, Parma and San Daniele hams are cured without nitrate or nitrite, and aquire their rosy color from some "ripening bacteria". He goes on to remark that the lack of protection afforded to the pork fat due to the absense of nitrite may actually increase the delicious hammy nature of the prosciutto.

Apparently French and Spanish hams do have nitrites.

I tell you, I do not know what I'd do without this book.

So, with that said, who around here is using nitrates and who's isn't?

Cheers,

-Dan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ron, the reason for pink salt in smoked salmon is to prevent botulism, which can grow on the outside of the salmon in a smokey warm environment.  it doesn't have anything to do with dryness.  i'll bet that comes from curing a really good lean wild fish--which requires considerably less time on the cure than grocery store salmon.  because it doesn't affect flavor much, i'd leave the pink salt but cut down on the cure time.

Michael - do you think there is a risk of botulism in a cold smoke of 2 hours w/out the sodium Nitrate?


Edited by mdbasile (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

depends on what's being smoked. if the spores are there, then there could be trouble. are they likely to be there? probably not but you never know. there are a lot of spores in the ground, so if it's cured with a veg or garlic, there might be.

re nitrites and nitrates.

you must use sodium nitrate (DQ #2) for dry cured sausages; this has nitrite and nitrate, which is like time released nitrite. the spores can be ground into the interior of the sausage.

use sodium nitrite (DQ #1), pink salt, for anything that's going to be smoked, or anything that you want a cured effect. but that's not going to be hung at room temp for a weeks.

you don't need pink salt for whole muscles that are hung to dry, eg ham, because there is no risk of botulism (spore can't be inside the muscle; and outside the bacteria can't grow because of oxygen).

A pancetta hung for two weeks is probably fine with pink salt, one because the pink salt prevents the bacteria and second, it's usually cooked till it's very hot, which would disable the toxin. if you were hanging it for a long time, however, i would use DQ #2 as a precaution.

i'm going to talk to brian about this issue, because no recipes or methods i know of call for sodium nitrate in pancetta cure.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How many links from the 13 lbs? - photos to come I assume...

I will obviously need to work on the purity of my foods...

I raise a glass to the new health food!!

Here is the sopressata, tied, weighed and ready to hang. Pre hang wt is 15 lbs 15.5 oz.

gallery_16509_1680_218303.jpg


Dave Valentin

Retired Explosive Detection K9 Handler

"So, what if we've got it all backwards?" asks my son.

"Got what backwards?" I ask.

"What if chicken tastes like rattlesnake?" My son, the Einstein of the family.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My only real complaint is, in spite of what the pics show, that the fish was a bit drier than I am used to.  Lox, as I know it, is much oilier.  I attribute this to the use of curing salt but I'm not sure that's accurate.  What I do know is that the fish's texture changed very little after it had been smoked.  After 36 hours of curing, it was much stiffer than I am used to when I make gravlax, which contains only Kosher salt.  Next time out, I will almost certainly omit the pink salt and see how it affects the final product.

I have not used the curing salt and the mosture seems fine. I have found that whenever I make the gravelox - a couple of days in the fridge - esp in a food saver package - helps the texture immensely - frankly seems to get better after a week or two. The dry edge and the more wet middle seem to have a little osmosis going on...

...

ron, the reason for pink salt in smoked salmon is to prevent botulism, which can grow on the outside of the salmon in a smokey warm environment.  it doesn't have anything to do with dryness.  i'll bet that comes from curing a really good lean wild fish--which requires considerably less time on the cure than grocery store salmon.  because it doesn't affect flavor much, i'd leave the pink salt but cut down on the cure time.

While I understand and appreciate the wish of the book to emphasise the association between cured gravadlax and cured & smoked salmon, the recipe on pages 96/97 (in proposing 36 hours dry salt curing, 4/24 hours drying and 6 hours of cold smoke), is giving an unusually heavy cure and a somewhat light smoke.

In the UK (at the very least) the practice is a very much lighter cure and rather more smoke.

And the smoke would be Oak, not fruit. (Though maybe old Oak from Whisky barrels.)

More typical of the British product would be an overnight dry cure and then rinse, or just 3 hours (maybe as little as 1 hour) in an 80% of saturated brine, followed by 24 hours of *hanging* to drip dry to a good pellicle for smoke adhesion, followed by 12 hours or more (up to 4 days!) of cold smoke - and then importantly allowing rest time (24 hours minimum) after smoking to allow the smoke flavour to permeate the fish. Of course the cold smoking doesn't have to be continuous, and the fish may be rested (helping the deep permeation of the flavour) when smoking isn't convenient.

While I do appreciate that it is very much a matter of taste, the most prestigious smokers, Forman & Field, use their "London Cure" of 12 hours on salt and (I think) 12 hours of thin smoke to produce the product sold in Fortnums and exported to the USA.

Keith Erlandson (Home Smoking and Curing - an established classic) prefers brining and reduces the brine time from 3 hours for poorer quality (lower fat) fish.

However we also have to deal with the fact that Pacific "salmon' are actually somewhat different fish, especially as compared to the Atlantic Salmon.

Its not just wild vs farmed, its actually a matter of zoologically different fish species.

Kate Walker of Innes Walker, a manufacturer of commercial smokehouses, writes in her Practical Food Smoking (at page 17) that because of botulism fears, the sale of cold-smoked Oncorhynchus Pacific salmon ("sockeye, coho,, chinook, chum, humpbach") is "prevented" in the USA. It seems that these fish are more susceptible than the Atlantic salmon - I don't believe its only a risk of it picking it up by cross-contamination. It seems that with the Pacific fish, there is a risk that they actually contain Botulinum.

Hence it would seem that nitrite or nitrate is especially important for *Pacific* salmon.

Both Walker and Erlandson use a touch of saltpetre in their pre-smoking cures. I have to say that Cure No 1 (using Nitrite) should be even better than saltpetre, not requiring bacterial activation. Saltpetre is the traditional curing salt, Nitrite a relatively modern variation - its used in even tinier quantities and is more dangerous (hence its available only diluted into mixed cures). However, Nitrite does have a shorter shelf life, oxidising to nitrate (saltpetre) and hence losing its potency.

However, I do wonder if the quantity of Nitrite being used in the book isn't maybe a little high.

6 g of pink salt at 6.25% Nitrite means 0.375g of Nitrite total. As compared to 450g of Salmon that is 833ppm. For dry cured ham, the US FSIS limit is 625ppm... 4g would give 555ppm.


"If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch ... you must first invent the universe." - Carl Sagan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
re nitrites and nitrates.

...

i'm going to talk to brian about this issue, because no recipes or methods i know of call for sodium nitrate in pancetta cure.

The USA deprecates the use of Nitrates (saltpetre) in items (like bacon) to be cooked at high temperature (like frying).

The use of Nitrite (and ascorbate accelerator) has been found to reduce the formation of nitrosamines on such high heating.

Hence I'm sure the US practice would be to use Nitrite, not Nitrate, for Pancetta.

However, Nitrate use is permissable in Europe, where the whole nitrosamine (carcinogenicity) question is seen as being imperfectly understood. Saltpetre has been used for hundreds, maybe thousands, of years - and at much higher levels than currently - without obvious epidemiological effect.

And nitrosamines, IIRC, are formed in the gut on the digestion of "health food" spinach...

The general point about using nitrate/saltpetre is to remember that it can't start "curing" until it has been first broken down by bacteria - into nitrite.

That first step is achieved only by bacteria - accelerators work *with* nitrite, but they don't help you get the first step, *to* nitrite.

Because of relying on bacterial action, saltpetre curing is seen as 'unreliable' or as the book says "inconsistent" in this age of refrigeration. Personally, I do a little room temperature "incubation" before curing with saltpetre.

Michael - For Charcuterie v1.1, could the bit about Cure No2 on pages 38 and 177 be tweaked to make clear that No2 *contains* some (4%) Nitrate (as well as 6.25% Nitrite) - its not ideally clear to say that Nitrate is "sold as" Cure No 2... or "sold under the brand names {of No 2}".

Saltpetre and Cure No2 are to be used in very different proportions, as I'm sure you well know, they are definitely not interchangeable.

Hey, minimally you might just change the "as" to "in"... :cool:


Edited by dougal (log)

"If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch ... you must first invent the universe." - Carl Sagan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
... I do wonder if the quantity of Nitrite being used in the book {for smoked salmon} isn't maybe a little high.

6 g of pink salt at 6.25% Nitrite means 0.375g of Nitrite total. As compared to 450g of Salmon that is 833ppm. For dry cured ham, the US FSIS limit is 625ppm... 4g would give 555ppm.

I agree that 6g is high. 28g/1oz of pink salt is used to cure 25lbs of meat, so for 1lb you should be using somewhere around 1.1-1.5g of pink salt.

Its not as simple as "1 oz is used to cure 25 lbs of meat".

There are different levels permitted for different cures and products.

The 625ppm that I quoted is the highest Nitrite level permitted, however that maximum limit is specified for the most analogous process - dry curing of meat. Its just 200ppm for injection or immersion cured meat...

Now, as to whether it needs to be anywhere near the maximum permitted level - well, that's another question entirely...


"If you wish to make an apple pie from scratch ... you must first invent the universe." - Carl Sagan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Similar Content

    • By JoNorvelleWalker
      Started in on Rob's book tonight.  Nice pictures, interesting philosophy.  The bit about grapevines reminded me ever so much about my balcony.  My grapevine has been growing ten or twenty years, planted by the birds.  Never a grape, ever.  Only recently did I learn that unlike European grapes, the native grapevines are sexual.  This one is undoubtedly a boy.  He provides lovely leaves and shade, and something for the tomatoes to hang onto.
       
    • By Bon Appetit Cookbooks
      This topic was hijacked from the Vancouver Board.
      What cookbooks do you love to cook out of at home?
      Is there a specific recipe that is your favorite?
      Or is there a book you just can't live without?
      If you have pictures, even better! Lets see how it turns out!
      Some of my favorites to cook out of:
      The Balthazar Cookbook - The Beef Tartar is amazing! As is the Chicken Liver Mousse
      The Babbo Cookbook - The Strawberries & Peaches with Balsamic Zabaglione
      Barefoot in Paris - The Blue Cheese Souffle looks JUST LIKE THE PICTURE!
      The Bouchon Cookbook - The Roast Chicken will seriously change your life
      Gordon Ramsey Makes it Easy - The Chocolate Pots are the easiest dessert in the world and tastes so good....especially with the Amedei #7
      There are lots more. Hopefully I can take pictures and show you.
      Hopefully this post can be an ongoing thing.
      I think we are all interested in what eachother cooks!
      Happy Cooking

      J
    • By Dave the Cook
      Those of us that have been following Rob Connoley's (aka gfron1) trek from home cook to down-and-literally-dirty locavore James Beard-semi-finalist chef are justifiably proud of his well-deserved transformation to a published author, which he has faithfully detailed in an earlier topic. If you're not familiar with his story, I urge you to catch up, then come back here, because we're ready to move on to the next step.
       
      Rob's book, Acorns & Cattails: A Modern Foraging Cookbook of Forest, Farm & Field, is finally, officially available. This alone is awesome news, and you should totally order your copy today. Or . . . 
       
      . . . we want to continue the conversation about Rob, his book and his future plans in this topic. And just to up the awesomeness, Rob is offering a free book to a randomly selected participant here.
       
      Simply post a question or comment in this topic between now and 11:59 p.m. CST (US), 13 September 2016 and you'll be eligible to "win," based on a random drawing to be conducted, with each participant getting one chance, not including Society volunteers (and Rob himself. Multiple posts will not improve your chances, so don't get overheated.)  The winner will be announced on 14 September.
       
      Rob will be along shortly to add his encouragement and whatever late-breaking news he has -- he's busy guy these days, so be patient -- but there's no need to wait to post questions or comments.
       
       
      P.S. And if you don't win, you should still get this book.
    • By liuzhou
      A few weeks ago I bought a copy of this cookbook which is a best-selling spin off from the highly successful television series by China Central Television - A Bite of China as discussed on this thread.   .
       

       
      The book was published in August 2013 and is by Chen Zhitian (陈志田 - chén zhì tián). It is only available in Chinese (so far). 
       
      There are a number of books related to the television series but this is the only one which seems to be legitimate. It certainly has the high production standards of the television show. Beautifully photographed and with (relatively) clear details in the recipes.
       
      Here is a sample page.
       

       
      Unlike in most western cookbooks, recipes are not listed by main ingredient. They are set out in six vaguely defined chapters. So, if you are looking for a duck dish, for example, you'll have to go through the whole contents list. I've never seen an index in any Chinese book on any subject. 
       
      In order to demonstrate the breadth of recipes in the book and perhaps to be of interest to forum members who want to know what is in a popular Chinese recipe book, I have sort of translated the contents list - 187 recipes.
       
      This is always problematic. Very often Chinese dishes are very cryptically named. This list contains some literal translations. For some dishes I have totally ignored the given name and given a brief description instead. Any Chinese in the list refers to place names. Some dishes I have left with literal translations of their cryptic names, just for amusement value.
       
      I am not happy with some of the "translations" and will work on improving them. I am also certain there are errors in there, too.
       
      Back in 2008, the Chinese government issued a list of official dish translations for the Beijing Olympics. It is full of weird translations and total errors, too. Interestingly, few of the dishes in the book are on that list.
       
      Anyway, for what it is worth, the book's content list is here (Word document) or here (PDF file). If anyone is interested in more information on a dish, please ask. For copyright reasons, I can't reproduce the dishes here exactly, but can certainly describe them.
       
      Another problem is that many Chinese recipes are vague in the extreme. I'm not one to slavishly follow instructions, but saying "enough meat" in a recipe is not very helpful. This book gives details (by weight) for the main ingredients, but goes vague on most  condiments.
       
      For example, the first dish (Dezhou Braised Chicken), calls for precisely 1500g of chicken, 50g dried mushroom, 20g sliced ginger and 10g of scallion. It then lists cassia bark, caoguo, unspecified herbs, Chinese cardamom, fennel seed, star anise, salt, sodium bicarbonate and cooking wine without suggesting any quantities. It then goes back to ask for 35g of maltose syrup, a soupçon of cloves, and "the correct quantity" of soy sauce.
       
      Cooking instructions can be equally vague. "Cook until cooked".
       
      A Bite of China - 舌尖上的中国- ISBN 978-7-5113-3940-9 
    • By yoboseyo
      Novice at meat-curer looking for advice. I'm making 2 pancettas this season.
       
      The first one I used the over-salting technique. What I didn't expect was that the salt would all turn into brine in a day, and I expected that I could scrape away the excess salt at the end. Instead, I left it on the brine for too long, and the result was too salty. The meat firmed up in 2 days so I should've taken it out then.
       
      For my second one, which is currently in the fridge, I used the equilibrium salting technique. I added about 100g salt for 3.5kg meat. The problem now is that it's not firming up seemingly at all! It has been 9 days in the fridge, and flipping it every day or 2. After 6 days, however, there was no pool of brine left. I put the meat in a folded over but unsealed bag. Did the brine evaporate or resoak into the meat?
       
      Any advice on how to continue would be appreciated.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.