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What kind of duck? Some of the farm raised birds are incredibly fatty, while wild ducks are lean. Makes a big difference in how to cook.

I would imagine it's farm raised since as far as I know it's illegal to sell wildlife.

thats true, but if its wild ,it is not worth eating ,they are bad tasteing(why I do not hunt them any more,If I am not gonna eat it I am not gonna kill it,,,)

bud..

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Pomegranate Lacquered Duck or Chicken

This easy lacquering technique takes only minutes and works equally well with duck breast or chicken thigh ‘chops’, skin on.

Simply score the skin side of 2 free-range duck breasts or chicken thighs but without going as deep as the meat layer. Season with pepper only and brown, skin side down in a medium heated pan for 7 minutes, reduce the heat and after 2-3 minutes more flip and cook 4-5 minutes on the second side, the exact time depends on the size and thighs will need more. Add a splash of cognac/brandy if you have it and flame off the alcohol and remove meat and rest, covered with foil. Pour any excess fat from the pan and de-glaze with equal amounts of pomegranate concentrate* and honey. Reduce to a syrup, remember it will thicken as it cools, taste, adjust seasoning, adding salt if necessary. Off the heat, add chopped walnuts, pomegranate avrils, orange slices. Lacquer the meat with the sauce. Serve sliced, on a bed of steamed spinach or mash, topped with the juices and extra sauce. Good with a big bowl of steamed spinach or a shaved fennel, walnut and orange salad.

Instead of concentrated pomegranate juice, you can also use pomegranate molasses + a little stock or balsamic vinegar.

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  • 1 year later...

Duck under used product.

 

Duck is amazing I am not talking the wild stuff with no fat which has spent its life running or flying from its natural enemies

 

Instead  the carefully raised farm product.

 

True you loose a lot of the product to fat dripping but what is left is great.

 

Tonight I did nothing to season the duck just set it up and roasted it   it up right  letting the fat drain out. 

 

I lost 40% of the duck by weight but the meat left was amazing  served it quartered over a bed of  celery root roasted in a bit of the duck fat with Kale and lemon salt.  I used the tasty part of  lemon rind as well as the lemon juice to brighten up taste.  All it needed on top of this was a bit of salt and pepper.

 

Really great.

Mike Macdonald Calgary

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Don't lose the fat. Gather it and store in the fridge. It keeps forever and is wonderful for frying or roasting potatoes.

And cassoulet and duck confit.

If the OP won't save duck fat, I propose he send us both some. ;)

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Love duck. Rotisserie on the BBQ works well if one wishes to avoid the oven mess that can result. A large drip pan with a little water underneath the duck will collect all that lovely fat. It takes awhile, I.e. 90 minutes or so. Pricking the skin all over helps it to crispen up.

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We cook duck about once every other week. We usually have crispy duck confit. For duck breast, I make stir fry. I take the skin off, cut it in strips and fry til crispy. The meat sliced thin, marinaded and goes in whatever vegetables we have. Crispy skin goes on top once the stir fry is done.

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I'll agree supermarket duck is quick, easy and delicious. I can't really understand the price hike on duck breasts compared to whole duck or duck legs. I like breast, but...

 

Yesterday: Roasted duck thighs (cheap, 6 for £7) with extra virgin olive oil, a bit of salt and pepper and Ras al Hanout, served with roasted pomodoro tomatoes and king oyster mushrooms (thank you Morrison's). Reserved the duck fat and 2 thighs.

 

Today: parboiled quartered potatoes, roasted in the duck fat, and re-cooked the duck thighs in the duck fat, allowing further rendering of the skin. With peas and finely chopped smoked bacon. A lovely lunch for two. Very close to confit...

 

I'm really looking forward to trying the celeriac, kale and lemon salt suggested by the OP.

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I love duck, but rarely get it; it's difficult to find in our grocery stores and expensive then I find it, and I'm no duck hunter. Like gfweb, I'd like to know how the wild fowl compares to the domestic; I'm guessing that the domestic is fatter and the wild is more flavorful provided it's cooked properly. So - Shelby, please tell us what you can about what you cook, how you cook it, and how the flavors work out. Anyone else who can make the comparison, let's hear it!

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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I eat a lot of duck. Because I like it. It is also widely available and cheap here in China; cheaper than chicken.

 

95% of what I buy is farmed duck which I usually get directly from the farm near my country home. If I'm in the city, the local farmer's market does just as good birds.

 

Very occasionally, I will get my hands on a wild duck. They are great when they are great and miserable when they are not. The meat is very favoursome when you get a good, relatively young one, but often they are old, tired and stringy. The lack of fat doesn't help and the end result can be dry as .... No matter what you do to counteract the dryness.

 

Farmed duck are a lot more consistent and have enough flavour. Plus you get all that lovely fat.

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...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

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Um, the "wild stuff with no fat that has spent it's life flying" is what we eat.

Interesting how is the wild stuff different than the farm product?

Frankly I can not see the farmed product flying around when I cooked them lost 40% by weight and had quite a bit of duck fat.

With the wild I would imagine not the same fat content but no "hands on" knowledge.

Mike Macdonald Calgary

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Interesting how is the wild stuff different than the farm product?

Frankly I can not see the farmed product flying around when I cooked them lost 40% by weight and had quite a bit of duck fat.

With the wild I would imagine not the same fat content but no "hands on" knowledge.

I've only had domestic duck a couple of times.....wild duck meat is darker, more iron-y tasting.  Less grease.  Leaner.  It must be cooked right, or it's awful.  We eat ours pretty rare.

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Interesting exactly the opposite to the farmed approach where the entire cooking process I used is designed to render most of the fat leaving a very succulent tasty finished product with a crispy skin.

How do you cook it? Debone then pan fry?

Mike Macdonald Calgary

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I've been reading/following threads on here awhile but this might be my first post. 

 

The most obvious difference between domestic and wild duck is the "no fat" part.  Wild game, ducks, geese, quail, pheasant, deer, et al, has very little if any fat.  In the kitchen that means the meat is not forgiving to overcooking - it will dry out quickly and develop the gamey, liver like flavor that is not good.  A high heat very quick cooking method works best for me (though I have a pheasant in the freezer that I'm thinking about introducing to my Anova...)

 

IMO the most significant difference between them are the species available.  The species of domestic duck is predetermined.  Long Island ducks are popular domestics products.  Muscovey ducks are popular in the asian markets near me. When I'm preparing domestic duck I like the product from the Hudson River Valley that is available at RD.  All of these are raised and sold because they are good eaters.

 

With wild ducks first you have to harvest (shoot) them.   While a hunter can target a specic species, a mixed bag is common.  There is no catch and release.  Ducks such as Mallards, Widgeon, Teal, Wood Ducks, Redheads, Mottled and others are all excellent table fare.  Shovelers, Bluebills, Meganzars and others cannot be made fit to eat.

 

The differences between wild and domestic geese are pretty much the same.

 

Hope this helps.

Edited by daveb (log)
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I've only had domestic duck a couple of times.....wild duck meat is darker, more iron-y tasting.  Less grease.  Leaner.  It must be cooked right, or it's awful.  We eat ours pretty rare.

Ever Sous vide it?

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Interesting exactly the opposite to the farmed approach where the entire cooking process I used is designed to render most of the fat leaving a very succulent tasty finished product with a crispy skin.

How do you cook it? Debone then pan fry?

Yep, breast it out and throw it in a hot skillet, or wrap in some bacon and grill it.  

 

Ever Sous vide it?

 

I'm still a sous vide virgin.

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Shelby

 

hope you've never SV'd  wild duck 'rare'  hope you don't tell us its beyond superb.

 

After the Anova, the CuisiSteamBoy, the next Toy  culinary assistant might be something from

 

Remington  :  one of these ?

 

http://www.remington.com/product-families/firearms/shotgun-families/autoloading-model-1100.aspx

 

Winchester ?   i like the scrollwork on these :

 

http://www.cabelas.com/catalog/browse/winchester-shotguns/_/N-1103080+4294736119/Ne-4294736119?WTz_st=GuidedNav&WTz_stype=GNU

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this thread is going to make me want to schlep to Chinatown one of these days and get some Cantonese roast duck.

maybe this weekend, come to think of it. it's been a while since I went to Noodletown. I can pick up a duck on the way home....

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this thread is going to make me want to schlep to Chinatown one of these days and get some Cantonese roast duck.

 

Not that 's there is anything wrong with Cantonese roast duck, but I think you can do better. Sichuan roast duck is great too. (I won't even bother you with Peking/Beijing. duck Done well, it is wonderful. Usually it isn't done well, especially in Beijing. Too many tourist clip joints.).

 

But I think China's best duck dishes aren't the roasts. Braised in a hundred ways. Hunan braised duck is to die for. I regularly ate Hunan duck hotpot when I lived there in the 1990s.I still wake up at night craving it.

 

Round here beer duck is a favourite. Its what it says on the label. Duck cooked in beer - with the usual Chinese aromatics, garlic ginger and chill peppers.

 

Duck of choice round here is the Pekin duck (note; that is a species of duck, not the famous duck dish, although the Pekin duck is used for Peking/Beijing Duck.Confused yet? A little 'g' can make a huge difference in Chinese. That's one reason why they don't use an alphabet)

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...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

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Not that 's there is anything wrong with Cantonese roast duck, but I think you can do better. Sichuan roast duck is great too. (I won't even bother you with Peking/Beijing. duck Done well, it is wonderful. Usually it isn't done well, especially in Beijing. Too many tourist clip joints.).

 

But I think China's best duck dishes aren't the roasts. Braised in a hundred ways. Hunan braised duck is to die for. I regularly ate Hunan duck hotpot when I lived there in the 1990s.I still wake up at night craving it.

 

Round here beer duck is a favourite. Its what it says on the label. Duck cooked in beer - with the usual Chinese aromatics, garlic ginger and chill peppers.

 

Duck of choice round here is the Pekin duck (note; that is a species of duck, not the famous duck dish, although the Pekin duck is used for Peking/Beijing Duck.Confused yet? A little 'g' can make a huge difference in Chinese. That's one reason why they don't use an alphabet)

I could probably get Sichuan roast duck if I knew which restaurants had them in NYC's (Manhattan) Chinatown. I put Manhattan in parentheses because the City has two other Chinatowns, one in Queens and a less well-known nabe in Brooklyn.

The one I'm referring to is predominantly (or maybe "was" is the operative word now) Cantonese, but seems to be majority Fuzhounese these days with a Cantonese minority.

Most of the restaurants I'm familiar with are Cantonese though, and so those are the ones I go to.

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I just made duck last night and it was great. I think I've discovered my favorite way of making duck legs.

 

The bones were made into a stock with ginger, garlic, leek greens and spring onions. The legs were briefly blanched in the stock, chilled in ice water, pricked all over the skin with a fork and then marinated in soy, honey, star anise and coriander. Legs went into a low oven (250F), covered for a few hours while the stock was cooking.

 

After taking out and cooling the legs, the juice that was rendered out was defatted, combined with more soy and honey and reduced down into a glaze while the stock was fortified with some salt and soy. The legs were then put under the broiler and periodically glazed until the outside was sticky and well browned.

 

Into the soup went bok choy, rice noodles and cilantro. Put some soup in a bowl, top with chopped up pieces of glazed duck and it was heaven.

 

The breasts, I made a pasta sauce from kale & leeks sauteed in duck fat, some white wine, reduced duck stock, garlic, cream, a bit of lemon juice, pureed until smooth. Mixed with fettuccine & duck cracklings with pan seared duck breasts on top was also fabulous.

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PS: I am a guy.

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