Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Edit History

btbyrd

btbyrd

1 hour ago, lindag said:

I think a big factor is how cold your fridge is.

 i keep mine at maximum cold.  Recently I put a frozen chicken in the garage fridge and three days later it was still rock solid.

(I like my beer cold.)

 

No joke! This is a rule I also follow. People should have a thermometer in their oven, but they should also have two in their fridge -- one on the top and one on the bottom shelf. And you should organize it so that perishable foods that can contaminate things (like raw meat) are physically lower in your fridge so that they only "contaminate downwards." It's the "trickle down" theory of fridge safety. Anyway, double check that your fridge is actually cold where you plan to store your food, and keep it as cold as you can without things freezing.

btbyrd

btbyrd

1 hour ago, lindag said:

I think a big factor is how cold your fridge is.

 i keep mine at maximum cold.  Recently I put a frozen chicken in the garage fridge and three days later it was still rock solid.

(I like my beer cold.)

 

No joke! This is a rule I also follow. People should have a thermometer in their oven, but they should also have two in their fridge -- one on the top and one on the bottom shelf. And you should organize it so that perishable foods that can contaminate things (like raw meat) are physically lower in your fridge so that they only "contaminate downwards." It's the "trickle down" theory of fridge safety.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...