Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Chris Hennes

Lunch! What'd ya have? (2012–2014)

Recommended Posts

• Hainanese Chicken Rice. Small (3 lb) Bell & Evans chicken, skin exfoliated w/ coarse Kosher salt, rinsed off, stuffed w/ sliced ginger and scallion pieces, poached [brought to boil then heat shut off] to ~ 160ºF in the thigh, dumped in ice water; rice (cooked w/ additional chicken fat, rendered in the rice pot; chopped garlic, ginger, pandan leaves, the poaching stock); young collard greens (hydroponic) in the poaching stock; grated ginger/chopped scallion/salt/hot oil dipping sauce.

attachicon.gifDSCN9650a_1k.jpg

it is as authentic as can be. The collard greens in stock looks like a v good innovation - hawker stalls normally just drop in chopped scallions.

however, i would also have the chilli+ginger+garlic+sugar+salt+rendered chicken fat dipping sauce...for me, i cant do without chilli in HCR.

Maybe its the photography, and YMMV but the chicken looks too pale and white - did you brush it with soya sauce and/or sessame oil right after you finished cooking it? The skin looks a bit thin: did you do the dipping in hot stock and ice/cold water 3 times or more? I was told that this technique increases the thickness of the skin's gelatinous collagen, but i still cannot get consistent results, and i blame it on the chicken, and not my technique :-))).


Edited by jsager01 (log)

It's dangerous to eat, it's more dangerous to live.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

• Hainanese Chicken Rice. Small (3 lb) Bell & Evans chicken, skin exfoliated w/ coarse Kosher salt, rinsed off, stuffed w/ sliced ginger and scallion pieces, poached [brought to boil then heat shut off] to ~ 160ºF in the thigh, dumped in ice water; rice (cooked w/ additional chicken fat, rendered in the rice pot; chopped garlic, ginger, pandan leaves, the poaching stock); young collard greens (hydroponic) in the poaching stock; grated ginger/chopped scallion/salt/hot oil dipping sauce.

attachicon.gifDSCN9650a_1k.jpg

it is as authentic as can be. The collard greens in stock looks like a v good innovation - hawker stalls normally just drop in chopped scallions.

however, i would also have the chilli+ginger+garlic+sugar+salt+rendered chicken fat dipping sauce...for me, i cant do without chilli in HCR.

Maybe its the photography, and YMMV but the chicken looks too pale and white - did you brush it with soya sauce and/or sessame oil right after you finished cooking it? The skin looks a bit thin: did you do the dipping in hot stock and ice/cold water 3 times or more? I was told that this technique increases the thickness of the skin's gelatinous collagen, but i still cannot get consistent results, and i blame it on the chicken, and not my technique :-))).

Authenticity is a slippery word. Still, thank you

Unlike ayam kampung in M'sia these and most non-free range chickens here do not have that deep yellow skin and darker flesh. (This chicken also had very thin skin to start with) I don't do the soy sauce brush or the sesame oil brush - I don't particularly care for them. I may brush the chicken after poaching w/ a neutral vegetable oil on occasion. I sometimes drizzle the assembled dish of chopped chicken pieces w/ sang chow, though, as I did here. I did the ice-water dipping just once. I frequently don't even do this - I like the extra gelatin that pools beneath the chicken (and gels into nice flavorful tidbits) when I don't. I'm not terribly concerned if I don't do precisely what some favored hawker or other does, I take into account what I feel like and what pleases me. I use many other kinds of vegetation and whatnot in the soups accompanying the HCR I make - I've described them in several other previous posts on HCR here on the forum. I use other sauces too, like a chicken liver sauce which I have also described elsewhere here. I also use various formulations for the chilli sauce for the HCR when I do have chilli sauce, also described elsewhere here.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some lunches from the last few weeks.

--------------------------

• Fried rice. Made w/ Chinese sausages (lap cheong; liver & wine-flavored varieties), smashed chopped garlic, broccoli florets, day-old Basmati rice.

DSCN9651a_800.jpg

--------------------------

• Red chard, “stir-fried” w/ minced pork, garlic, plus splashes of this-and-that (don’t exactly remember what now).

• Spaghetti [Garofalo] w/ leftover “Marcella Hazan” tomato sauce.

DSCN9654b_800.jpg

DSCN9659b_800.jpg

---------------------------

• Fresh wood-ear fungus (muk yee; 木耳) sautéed w/ small fresh Chinese mushrooms (shiitake-type; tung koo; 冬菇), scallions & coriander leaves.

• Romaine hearts stir-fried w/ garlic & fermented bean curd (fu yee; 腐乳).

• Leftover Teochew-style Bak Kut Teh (from here).

• White rice (Basmati).

DSCN9697a_800.jpg

----------------------------

• Chinese rose wine & shrimp soup. I had been thinking of this off-and-on since Anna N’s post and finally got around to it.

• Fried rice w/ chopped Chinese long beans, lots of chopped scallions, chopped celery, farm eggs scrambled in situ. (Not pictured)

DSCN9740b_800.jpg

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

image.jpg

Dry-fried beans with ground chicken instead of pork and I added some bean sprouts rather than let them die.

  • Like 2

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Couple of past lunches.

---------------------------

Lunch

• Salad of romaine & red leaf lettuces, red Russian kale, a Marconi pepper, and Napa cabbage heart. Dressed w/ a vinaigrette of smooth Dijon mustard [Grey Poupon], ‘Stoneground Xxspress Mustard’ [Local Folks Foods], sugar, sea salt, ‘Aged Gourmet Rice Vinegar’ [Kong Yen], EV olive oil [Fresh Foods], generous fresh ground black pepper, fresh lime juice, generous rice wine (ryori-shu) [Morita].

• Leftover beef short ribs stewed w/ young daikon, lily buds, bamboo shoots, Chinese-type shiitake mushrooms (far koo), garlic, mutenka shiro miso paste [Maruman] (see here and here for more info). Gussied up w/ more of some ingredients & re-stewing for a bit.

DSCN9788a_800.jpg

DSCN9790a_800.jpg

-----------------------------

Lunch

Part I.

• Steamed char siu bao [Prime Food].

• Steamed pork, scallop & shrimp dumplings (shui gow) [Wei Chuan], dressed w/ chopped scallions. (no pic, I was tucking into it before I remembered the camera)

Part II.

• Teochew-style steamed fresh striped bass. Live fish from the tank the day before. Dressed w/ Shaoh Xing wine [Lam Sheng Kee], sliced ripe tomato, sliced scallions & ginger (also stuffed into fish cavity), vegetable oil, sea salt, slight drizzle of light soy sauce, sliced preserved sour mustard (syun choi/harm choy) [Pigeon brand], pickled plums [Hana]; then steamed till just done.

• Cauliflower florets “stir-fried”/sautéed w/ garlic in vegetable oil.

• White rice (Basmati).

DSCN9817a_1k.jpg

DSCN9814a_1k.jpg

DSCN9819a_1k.jpg

DSCN9822a_1k.jpg


Edited by huiray (log)
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just because I managed to reach the exalted age of 72 without ever having made real honest to goodness chicken soup... I do have some trouble eating chicken because of all the little extra bitsies which are involved unless you eat straight chicken breast meat which is not fascinating. .

Used a leftover gifted B-B-Q chicken with Martha Stewart's recipe leaving out the bay leaves and the garlic. Incredibly delicious. Was blown away.

  • Like 1

Darienne

learn, learn, learn...

Cheers & Chocolates

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Late lunch/early dinner yesterday:

• Pan-fried Merguez sausages [smoking Goose, this one; via Goose the Market]; a chunky cultivar of Maitake mushrooms (see here) sautéed in the pan residues & oil; Austrian Crescent & Purple Peruvian fingerling potatoes simply simmered in salted water & tossed in the pan remnants to coat w/ a little oil.

• Chicken broth w/ fresh leafy celery wilted in it.

DSCN9831a_800.jpg

DSCN9830a_800.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am always amazed by huiray's lunches but especially by his use of chicken broth. I think a light finally went on in my head and I realized that he takes chicken broth as a base and then adds whatever tasty bites he has on hand, fresh and/or leftover. I doubt I can come close to his access to amazing ingredients or to his imagination in combining them but this was still tasty.

image.jpg

Chicken broth simmered with some ginger, garlic and star anise. Wontons, meatballs and chopped spinach added once it had a chance to develop some flavour.

  • Like 3

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks yummy, Anna N. You are too kind in your comments about my lunches.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yesterday's lunch:

De-ribbed Tuscan kale blanched in boiling oiled water; couple of natural-case Wieners [Dietz & Watson] cooked in that oiled boiling water; "Vegetarian Noodles" (dried) [White Elephant brand] cooked in salted water then tossed w/ leftover Marcella Hazan tomato sauce.

DSCN9874a_800.jpg


Edited by huiray (log)
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

image.jpg

Stir-fried ginger beef with tomatoes from Stir Frying to the Sky's Edge. I served it over shirataki noodles. This was initially quite disappointing. There are any number of Asian ingredients but all were buried by the tomatoes. But it grew on me. I am not a fan of Italian pasta with tomato-based sauces yet I would make this again. So perhaps those Asian ingredients played a larger role than I give them credit for.

There was enough for two meals so I re-heated it for dinner and added some bok choy on the side.

Must learn less messy plating techniques.

  • Like 2

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

(This is a re-post of something posted a couple of days ago. The original post got eaten by the nasties lurking in the system. Intrepid investigators are investigating intrepidly.)

One egg omelette - One goose egg.

Goose egg omelette with beef bone marrow and mixed mushrooms.

A new supermarket in town has goose eggs and beef marrow bones

goose eggs 3 (Large).jpg

marrow bone (Large).jpg

So, I removed the marrow from the bones and sliced it up a bit, rehydrated some cépes and sliced some button mushrooms.

bone marrow and mushrooms (Large).jpg

I put the marrow into a dry pan and let it render / cook. Some of the rendered fat was poured off and saved for another day.

bone marrow rendering (Large).jpg

The mushrooms were added and fried till cooked through, then set aside.

bone marrow and mushrooms cooking (Large).jpg

The pan was cleaned and some butter melted. A goose egg was cleaned, cracked and beaten with s+p and some dried Herbes de Provence (sure, fresh would have been better, but what you ain't got you don't have. I'm a long way from Provence.)

The egg mixture was tipped into the pan and swirled to coat the base. As the egg on the bottom set, the unset egg on top was tipped to the edge in the time-honoured fashion.

omelette3 (Large).jpg

When almost set, the mushroom and marrow mixture was added to one side of the thing

omelette3 unfolded (Large).jpg

and the omelette folded around the filling.

omelette3 folded (Large).jpg

It was then plated

omelette3 plated (Large).jpg

Seconds later it looked like this

omelette3 eating (Large).jpg


Edited by liuzhou (log)
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Glad you were able to re-post. It has never occurred to me to re-hydrate mushrooms to use in an omelette. It reveals how my thoughts are pigeon-holed for no good reason! Must incorporate dried mushrooms into other things than stews and Asian dishes. Thanks.


Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

image.jpg

A kitchen sink soup based on cheater's Asian chicken broth.


Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In most ways this was a very simple light lunch, but it was also rather special.

I was given a wonderful gift of some beautiful Jinhua Ham (金华火腿), generally regarded as China's finest. And fine it is! One of the world's finest, I would say - certainly up there with the Spanish wonders.

jinhua.jpg

So I added a bit to a chicken stock made using free-range chicken legs (they range with the rest of their body, too) with shallots, garlic, and ginger.

Then once the stock was ready, I used it to cook some chicken leg meat, added some more of the ham, some (very) fresh rice noodles handmade by my neighbour (no oil!), a little salt (Beihai sea salt from near the Chinese/Vietnamese border) , a sprinkling of Shichimi Togarishi (Japanese 7 spice mixture) and a scattering of chopped Chinese chives (these were added right at the end and allowed to wilt in the residual heat while I took the photos.

jinhua and chicken noodles2.jpg

jinhua and chicken noodles.jpg

Happy mouth.


Edited by liuzhou (log)
  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some recent lunches.

------------------------

• Beef shin & veggie soup.

Whole beef shin, trimmed, cut into 1½ - 2 inch rounds, browned in oil seasoned w/ lightly crushed garlic cloves (reserved); quenched w/ water, sautéed garlic added back in, sea-salt added, simmered for 30-40 min; whole cloves & stick cinnamon & a couple whole star anise added in together w/ halved scrubbed purple potatoes & halved baby scrubbed daikon; simmered some more. Halved (lengthwise) fresh carrots & generous quartered red & white onions added, simmered some more. Seasoning adjusted. [The only thing that had its “skin” removed was the garlic, and the onions with the dry skin taken off. ;-) ]

• Broccoli florets, stir-fried w/ smashed garlic & fu yee (fermented beancurd) [Chan Moon Kee] simmered down in the sautéeing mixture.

• White rice (Basmati).

DSCN9664b_1k.jpg

-------------------------

Kon Lo Mein, using skinny wonton noodles; dressed w/ a sauce of minced beef & veal (1:1) sautéed w/ garlic and ginger & various sauces including oyster sauce [LKK], “Luscious Soy Paste” [Kim Lan], sesame oil [Dragonfly], mirin, light soy sauce, ryori-shu.

• Steamed har gow & siu mai [commercial], eaten w/ a dipping sauce of mixed soy sauces w/ rice vinegar & chopped scallions.

DSCN9882a_1k.jpg

DSCN9884a_1k.jpg

--------------------------

• Fried rice. Roughly chopped char siu (Chinese BBQ pork), chopped smashed garlic, a sliced-up Carmen Italian sweet pepper, 2-day-old white rice (Basmati), frozen peas, lots of trimmed Thai basil, sliced-up plain 3-egg omelette (fried separately; hot oil, hot pan, sizzle, flip).

• Chicken broth w/ carrots & leaf celery.

DSCN9897a_800.jpg

--------------------------

Kangkong belacan, with dried prawns (har mai) added in as well.

Babi pongteh, with sliced pork belly (*definitely* skin-on). This time I loosely patterned it after this recipe but using peanut oil and Red Thumb & Austrian Crescent fingerling potatoes. I used palm sugar (gula melaka).

• White rice (Basmati).

DSCN9904a_800.jpg

DSCN9906a_800.jpg

There are discussions about removing (!) pork belly skin elsewhere on the forum as well as discussions that largely dwell on getting great puffed and crispy skin etc. IMO soft, yielding, fall-apart skin w/ lovely gelatinous textures (such as in this dish) are quite wonderful too, but perhaps not all will appreciate that. :-)


Edited by huiray (log)
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

image.jpg

Tebasaki chicken wings from a Cooking with Dog recipe. (For those not familiar, the dog is the host not the main ingredient.)

  • Like 3

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

image.jpg

The last of a supermarket rotisserie chicken. Torn romaine, grape tomatoes, shredded chicken, few parmesan strips all dressed with a faux caesar dressing.

  • Like 1

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Remember this topic

http://forums.egullet.org/topic/145656-instant-lunch-half-an-hour-to-make-and-eat-for-unexpected-visitor-suggestions-anyone/?hl=lunch

Where I asked for help coming up with speedy lunches for unexpected guests?

When all your suggestions poured in I realized,

a. You must have thought I'd finally lost all my marbles

and

b. I had neglected to share a very limiting parameter - my guest(s) are low or no carbers!

So today I was challenged again but pulled together this:

image.jpg

Romaine lettuce, grape tomatoes, smoked oysters, hearts of palm, mayo, faux caesar dressing, store bought antipasti and (not shown) homemade roasted tomatoes.

  • Like 3

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ashamed to say...my lunch today was half of a pint of Ben and Jerry's "What a Cluster". I think I cured my ice cream craving for a while. :blush:

  • Like 3

"Only dull people are brilliant at breakfast" - Oscar Wilde

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just half a pint? Aw shucks, you should have gone for a whole pint, half a pint seems hardly worthwhile. Sounds like a nice lunch, though. ;-)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...