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Chris Hennes

Lunch! What'd ya have? (2012–2014)

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I'm probably going to get kicked out of this thread for this, but it was for lunch today and it was too fun to pass up showing you....

attachicon.gifLonchy.jpg

You must explain the octopus - is that a carved mushroom?

Heh. Looks fun, indeed. Yes, is that what Heidi suggests it is? It certainly doesn't seem to be part of the "contents" of the advertised product! :-)

http://www.lonchys.com/

Hmm, seems one is supposed to get generously overflowing noodles and stuff - including BIG bowls of it... http://www.quebakan.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/8.jpg But you must have already gobbled down a good deal of it. :-D

I eat instant noodles in bowls or from packets all the time too. :-) With the ones from packets I do tend to gussy them up with extra veggies and stuff.

ETA: Ah, IowaDee suggests a hot dog. Heh.


Edited by huiray (log)

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I'm probably going to get kicked out of this thread for this, but it was for lunch today and it was too fun to pass up showing you....

attachicon.gifLonchy.jpg

You must explain the octopus - is that a carved mushroom?

You mean to say you've never had an octodog? The one in my Lonchy is a chicken hotdog carved to look like an octopus.


Elizabeth Campbell, baking 10,000 feet up at 1° South latitude.

My eG Food Blog (2011)My eG Foodblog (2012)

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Duckburger with a Pico de Gallo type salad and (duck fat fried) chips.

attachicon.gifduckburger and chips.jpg

attachicon.gifduckburger cooked.jpg

attachicon.gifPico de Gallo.jpg

I am not a fan of hamburgers but a duck burger.......we could talk.


Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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It's been a while since I've posted here due to some health issues but I followed everyone's amazing lunches as best I could. Things are looking up again so I hope to post more frequently. Today's lunch was my take on cold, spicy ramen noodles by Joe Yonan from his latest book "Eat Your Vegetables".

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Kerry - is that mashed avocado amped up with kimchee?

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For some reason I was expecting it all to be hotter...

I have not found Cajun food to be particularly "hot spicy" though pepper sauces are always on the table for individual adjustment and add-ins. Here is a snippet from an interview with Chef John Folse giving a a good explanation:

"Cajun food is always seasoned, but not always hot and spicy. Spicy insinuates that the food is highly flavored with peppers such as cayenne, Tabasco, etc. However, highly seasoned, which Cajun cooking certainly is, refers to flavor in our food: onions, celery, bell pepper, garlic, green onions, parsley and even herbs, such as basil, thyme, tarragon and rosemary. "

Heidi - that is certainly helpful for a cajun-virgin (sounds like a band name). By that description, I'd say my meal above hit all the high points quite well!

Cajun is all about the blending of flavors not necessarily just the heat. One of the best explanations I have read.


Dwight

If at first you succeed, try not to act surprised.

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Cajun is all about the blending of flavors not necessarily just the heat. One of the best explanations I have read.

I would imagine that "blending of flavors" is a common thread in most cuisines, not just Cajun, no?

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Some recent meals.

-------------------------

• Pressed beef tongue [Claus’] & “Dodge City Salami” [Goose the Market].

• Semolina bread [Amelia’s].

• “Marbled” scrambled eggs, in the juices left over from sautéeing Merguez sausages + a little more oil added in.

• Blanched “yu choy sum” drizzled w/ ponzu (soy) sauce & dusted w/ ground black pepper.

DSCN9277aa_1k.jpg

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• Cucumber soup. Made w/ Indian cucumbers (hardened yellow-brown skin; deseeded), pork spare ribs, Chinese jujubes (“lam jou” variety), garlic, dried oysters, dried scallops. Salted to taste.

DSCN9280b_1k.jpg

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• Stir-fried “Seng Choy” (edible amaranth), red-green variety; w/ soaked dried prawns (“har mai”), soy oil - prawn paste, chilli paste, garlic.

• Stir-fried bittergourd w/ beef & garlic.

• White rice.

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• Pan-fried “Schnecken” sausage, boiled small purple & red/rose-Yukon potatoes, sautéed chopped de-ribbed Tuscan kale.

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• Spaghetti w/ pesto.

• Stir-fried sliced lotus root, trimmed “wong nga pak” (Napa cabbage) heart, sliced sweet red pepper, softened snow fungus (Tremella fuciformis), soaked “kum chum” (lily buds).

DSCN9304a_1k.jpg

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• Pea soup. Made w/ dried whole skin-on peas, a “ham nugget”, fresh green/yellow carrots, fresh red-skin carrots, small red/rose Yukon potatoes, a few bay leaves. Seasoned to taste. I was reminded why I seldom make pea soup – it gives me indigestion.

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Some of the veggies before adding to the soup:

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• Angled loofah (Luffa acutangula), pork spare ribs & garlic soup; with cellophane noodles [Lung Kow].

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• Steamed yellowtail snapper. Done in a Cantonese style.

• Winter melon soup.

• White rice (Himalayan Basmati).

DSCN9336a_1k.jpg

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• Jamón Serrano, sliced Purple Haze & Amazon Chocolate tomatoes, sautéed halved Roma beans, pieces of an ‘Epi’ “wheat stalk” loaf.

DSCN9349a_1k.jpg


Edited by huiray (log)
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Cajun is all about the blending of flavors not necessarily just the heat. One of the best explanations I have read.

I would imagine that "blending of flavors" is a common thread in most cuisines, not just Cajun, no?

Not necessarily. A lot of Latin American cooking is based on allowing the balanced, individual flavours of the ingredients to shine, rather than creating new flavours based on blending. This means that the recipes look deceptively simple (the Shrimp Encocado I posted recently in Dinner! has exactly 5 ingredients), but are frustratingly difficult to get right unless you've got access to extraordinarily fresh everything and the right touch in terms of proportions.


Elizabeth Campbell, baking 10,000 feet up at 1° South latitude.

My eG Food Blog (2011)My eG Foodblog (2012)

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image.jpg

Pork and chive potstickers

Though I much prefer my own home made potstickers there are times when the supermarket freezer case variety must suffice.

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Cajun is all about the blending of flavors not necessarily just the heat. One of the best explanations I have read.

I would imagine that "blending of flavors" is a common thread in most cuisines, not just Cajun, no?

Not necessarily. A lot of Latin American cooking is based on allowing the balanced, individual flavours of the ingredients to shine, rather than creating new flavours based on blending. This means that the recipes look deceptively simple (the Shrimp Encocado I posted recently in Dinner! has exactly 5 ingredients), but are frustratingly difficult to get right unless you've got access to extraordinarily fresh everything and the right touch in terms of proportions.

Well, I consider "allowing the balanced, individual flavours of the ingredients to shine, rather than creating new flavours" to be a variation of blending as a general category. I don't draw a sharp line between "balancing" and "blending" - to me they are facets of the same principle, to get things to harmonize or, alternatively, to come to a condition where one feels that eating the dish is a nice sensation of flavors that do not fight with each other or that leaves one with the feeling of being sullied in some way. Some combinations may not be an orchestra of rhapsodic harmony but they work together nevertheless, e.g. such as in cases where tastes pleasantly contrast with each other in the same dish. I would also consider that to be a "blending" - even if they may be of disparate characters.

In contrast and as an example of an "extreme case" of blending, I once knew a guy who took pride in his concoction of a "curry mix" which had more than 30 ingredients in it, and he was actually looking to increase the number of components in it to "enhance it's complexity and "depth" " as he claimed. I thought it quite excessive.


Edited by huiray (log)

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image.jpg

Leftover seasoned pork (from Dan dan noodles) added to stir-fired onion and cabbage. Simple but tasty.


Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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We had a couple of great looking burger patties given to us by a local farmer, and the kids are back at school so me and Mrs Meshugana had these for lunch:

y5e9ugeb.jpg

Fried bacon in the cast iron, then fried mushrooms and jalapeños in the bacon renderings with the burgers. Pepper jack cheese and cheap bread - was delicious.

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PastaMeshugana

"The roar of the greasepaint, the smell of the crowd."

"What's hunger got to do with anything?" - My Father

My eG Food Blog (2011)

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image.jpg

Kimchi pancakes (made with home-made kimchi) and a spicy dipping sauce.


Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Kimchi pancakes

wow. I pretty much get the idea: scallion pancakes with Kimchi subbed.

nice artistque points on them.

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Kimchi pancakes

wow. I pretty much get the idea: scallion pancakes with Kimchi subbed.

nice artistque points on them.

Much simpler to make than scallion pancakes! Even simpler if you use a pre-made mix as I did.


Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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We had a couple of great looking burger patties given to us by a local farmer, and the kids are back at school so me and Mrs Meshugana had these for lunch:

y5e9ugeb.jpg

Fried bacon in the cast iron, then fried mushrooms and jalapeños in the bacon renderings with the burgers. Pepper jack cheese and cheap bread - was delicious

Great burgers on cheep white bread is a wonderful thing.


Dwight

If at first you succeed, try not to act surprised.

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Few days ago:

Green pepper with rice and pork or a beef in the bechamel sauce and cheese.

20130823_153551.jpg


Edited by rod rock (log)

"The way you cut your meat reflects the way you live."

Franchise Takeaway

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A few meals from the past week or so:

------------------------------

Lunch

• Beef shin slow-braised w/ bamboo shoots, garlic, bay leaves, cinnamon sticks, cloves & various sauces and condiments.

• White rice (Basmati).

DSCN9360bb_1kP.jpg

The shin was bought intact then cut up into rounds.

DSCN9351a_1k.jpg

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Lunch

• Fresh orecchiete tossed in the pan w/ a sauce prepared from sliced “Kitchen Sink” sausages, Roma beans, Chocolate Stripe tomatoes, garlic, shallots, EV olive oil.

DSCN9378b_1k.jpg

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Dinner

• Pan-fried swordfish. (Marinated O/N in a ziplock bag w/ ripe lime juice (from one large lime), lime zest, smashed & chopped garlic (Purple Glazer), fresh chopped rosemary, sea salt, some rice wine [MRT ryori-shu] & sweet mirin [Honteri])

• Fresh red durum wheat semolina angel hair pasta, tossed w/ the pan juices & fond from the frying of the swordfish deglazed w/ ryori-shu [MRT] plus more oil.

• Sautéed French filet beans.

DSCN9384b_1k.jpg

DSCN9385a_1k.jpg

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Lunch

• Chicken leg quarters (browned in the pan first) braised w/ fingerling potatoes (Russian Banana & Red Thumb; also pan-browned first), red & orange carrots, cipollini onions, two heads of garlic (Purple Glazer; parchments left on but broken up into several chunks of cloves), sea salt, rice wine, mirin; and fresh thyme (leaves only) plus fistfuls of fresh tarragon (leaves only) towards the end.

DSCN9392a_1k.jpg


Edited by huiray (log)
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Huiray, you make the most amazing lunches.

image.jpg

Green beans in sa cha sauce. Not quite as good as Dunlop's dry-fried beans with pork but for a simple dish it grew on me. I'll be making it again.


Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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