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Confections! What did we make? (2012 – 2014)


Chris Hennes
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I'm really interested in how to achieve this effect as well - very cool!

I bought the transfer sheets from Amazon. I had to read up on it a bit and do trial and error, Using the flat top of your candies, you just lay the sheet on top and press down lightly and it transfers to it. Just don't press too hard!! I had to eat a couple of the first ones!! :rolleyes: cause I smashed them.

Edited by grammacake12 (log)

Stressed spelled backwards is DESSERTS!!

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So you touched the transfer sheets to the unmolded chocolates after they were crystallized and hardened?

yes, I  pressed them down on it with a small at first, but didn't have as much control as I did with my fingernail, I tried a few more today. I think I am getting the hang of it.

 

1912256_10152028581058207_1739863743_n.j

Edited by grammacake12 (log)

Stressed spelled backwards is DESSERTS!!

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How do you do it? This is the first time I have tried it. I ordered some more transfer sheets today. I am getting ready for a craft show in a couple weeks, so need to get several different things made.

1625648_10152028581078207_1648225647_n.j

Stressed spelled backwards is DESSERTS!!

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Two ways - either in the bottom of a magnetic mold (as shown here) or placed on top of a dipped piece (as shown here) - go down to almost the bottom of the pictures to see the transfers placed on top of the dipped items.  

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Thanks Kerry!

 

 

What a great job of dipping!  Did you do them by hand?  If so, how did you get them so perfect?

 

Heh, far too much practice ;) All by hand into a little 3kg melt bowl! It took about 1 1/2 hrs to do 120 pieces, but the kids were being pretty distracting. Would usually do that in about an hour.

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IMG_20140215_2042371.jpg

S'mores on a stick. Vanilla bean marshmallow dipped in chocolate and graham cracker crumbs.

The chocolate behaved like good temper, but took a very long time to set. I suspect oil infiltration from a prior use hand-dipping gianduja.

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Little surprises 'round every corner, but nothing dangerous

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It's been a loooooong time since I've been able to make anything new, but heres something. I made some chocolate hearts I made, and I also was playing with some luster dust. I'm actually rather pleased with the results, especially the copper colored pieces.

Chocolate Hearts.jpg

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Minas,

Those look good.  Did you brush the luster dust dry into the molds, or did you use some other method to apply it (such as mixing it with liquor)?  I ask because I have luster dust on order (from a place you recommended) and will be doing some experimentation with it.  I have used a copper metallic cocoa butter (from Chef Rubber) that results in a similar look.

 

Jim

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A little late, but these was made as christmas presents for family and friends.

 

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Mango/passionfruit and white chocolate ganache

 

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Salted caramel

 

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Goatcheese and lemon thyme ganache

 

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Hazelnut praliné with homemade fuilletine

 

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Grand Marnier mazipan layer and orange ganache layer

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1655722_458146064313273_288684753_o.jpg

a lime ganache (I've made this one and posted before, I think)

1912467_458146110979935_164127969_n.jpg

A cherry/raspberry jam with a vanilla ganache. I might dust these with some red dust as the small amount I put in the mold hasn't shown up terribly well - you can see it in the light, but that's it!

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