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Confections! What did we make? (2012 – 2014)


Chris Hennes
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Today I made my first transfer sheet for chocolates, and it turned out much better than I had anticipated. I used some colored cocoa butters (from Chef Rubber) that I had lying around. I didn't make an explicit attempt to temper them (there is a difference of opinion on this subject, I have learned), but I did stir the mostly melted cocoa butter with some unmelted until it thickened somewhat. So for the bottom layer (which would become the top) I used a small whisk to splatter some of the rose-colored cocoa butter (being more careful this time not to splatter the walls of my kitchen as well!). I let that dry, then finger-painted the blue in sort of crescent shapes. I sprinkled half of the transfer with gold glitter to see how that would turn out. I was alarmed that the cocoa butter was in rather thick blobs in some places--unlike professional transfers--but that did not seem to matter in the unmolding process later. I cut the sheet to the size of the mold and made shells with some milk chocolate. To my great surprise, the shells turned out rather well. The gold glitter barely showed up; I am guessing it melted when I poured in the milk chocolate--so far I have had no luck with using glitter.

For those who have been thinking of making their own transfer sheets, I highly recommend giving this process a try. It is a lot of fun. I can't become a convert to this method since I recently bought a large supply of PCB sheets from Qzina and have to use those first.

transfer-sheet.jpg

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Heres a few things I just did for an event. Gold dusted caramels, espresso caramels, and sea salt caramels, along with blackberry and peach pate de fruit.

For my part, I can't get over the caramels. I have several different formulas, but none of them turn out firm enough to stand alone like those; dip or wrap in less than 10 minutes is required! Do you mind sharing a recipe? I can't decide if I should start troubleshooting my formulae or my technique.

Little surprises 'round every corner, but nothing dangerous

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For my part, I can't get over the caramels. I have several different formulas, but none of them turn out firm enough to stand alone like those; dip or wrap in less than 10 minutes is required! Do you mind sharing a recipe? I can't decide if I should start troubleshooting my formulae or my technique.

Thanks! Glad you like them! The folios is from Chocolates and Confections. Specifically, the sea salt caramels use the formula that include sweetened condensed milk, and the espresso caramels use the formula that contains evaporated milk and fresh cream. For as many recipes as you've tried, I'm going to assume you have Greweling book. There's a note on each caramel recipe that the temp of 239f or so is just an estimate, and that the caramels should be tested by hand. When making caramels, I add the butter at 230f or so, then when it nears 235ish I remove the thermometer and test a little bit of the mixture in cold water every few minutes, and you'll just see what the caramel feels like as you cook it a little longer. Just make some caramels and cook them a little longer then your inclined to. They will set up firmer, and have nice sharp edges when you cut them. Let me know if you want grewelings recipe if you don't have it already.

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Sooooo pretty Minas!

What is that Apple filled with if anything?

Thanks! The apple is hollow, just a blown piece. It was just to see if I could do it, then after 15 tries I finally got the shape!

This looks amazing, the form and colours and both really nicely nuanced.

Michaela, aka "Mjx"
Manager, eG Forums
mscioscia@egstaff.org

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nothing quite as fancy from me this weekend as minas' apple ;) Just boring old chocolates :P

Chris,

Very nice. I especially like the hearts. How did you get that nice splatter on them? Mine sometimes comes out in blobs or dribbles. The most successful time was when I used a toothbrush, but it was a total mess--I am still finding dots of cocoa butter all over the kitchen!

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Heres the rest of this weekends activities. Had another try at macarons, this was from the book 'Patisserie,'french meringue method, and it worked wonderful, got much more of a feel for making these shells. Next is a marzipan I made this morning, and then some marshmallows that will be at a hot cocoa bar at a wedding. Marshmallow flavors, left to right, are ginger, cinnamon/nutmeg, and cocoa.

Baking Macs.jpg

Jam Macs.jpg

Marzipan.jpg

Wedding Mallows.jpg

Edited by minas6907 (log)
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Kerry : It works both ways... Have you tried airbrushing that mixture? 80% high alcohol (90+% from Quebec works great) 20% powder

ZMaster : I don't mind explaining the processes, but truthfully it's indicated all over the forum. If you do need let me know.

Minas6907: if I may give you a little advice, you should mix gently (macaronner) your mixture a little more. It should be slightly runny (au ruban) and tap your tray with the flat of your hand to flatten the macaron just a little bit, or drop it on the table twice. For the rest, I love your products and confiserie, great job.

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Rodney, do you airbrush the mixture on finished piece or the mold?

For the heart, it was after. I bought a bottle of velvet spray from a supplier, thinking I was gonna save time and money. And unfortunately saved none of the two.

The other 7 are airbrushed, brushed, or finger painted prior to chocolate molding. It takes too long when you don't have enough molds.

Have a great day

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I have airbrushed a similar mixture that I got as a sample at the PMCA a few years back. Strangely it had something along with the alcohol in it and I've never been able to wash it out of the molds since. I suppose I need to give them a rinse with some lacquer thinner - but that's probably not food safe!

I have Clear Spring 190 proof alcohol that I buy on the american side at the duty free.

I've not been happy with any of those sprays that I've bought - the airbrush seems to do a better job.

Rodney - what sort of airbrush are you using at the shop?

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IMG_0590.jpg

Snapping turtles - milk chocolate with poprocks. I'm packaging them 3 in a cello sleeve. Working on a bunch of items for an upcoming fun fair at my child's school.

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