• Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

  • product-image-quickten.png.a40203b506711f7664fc62024e54a584.pngDid you know that these all-volunteer forums are operated by the 501(c)3 not-for-profit Society for Culinary Arts & Letters? This holiday season, consider a tax-deductible Quick Ten Bucks to support the eG Forums and help us remain completely advertising-free. Thanks to all those who have donated so far!

Chris Hennes

Confections! What did we make? (2012 – 2014)

574 posts in this topic

Preparing a peach pate de fruit for a springtime wedding.

Peach Pate de Fruit, Alyssa.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As always, your work is gorgeous, sir. :wub:


Darienne

learn, learn, learn...

Cheers & Chocolates

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, its been a while! Thought i'd post just a few photos of what we've done at the shop this year! Hoping to get to the eG conference, but lots of personal and professional things have things up in the air...but for all the newbies, welcome to eG! It's actually with the help of my eG family that i took the leap to go from an on-line business to a shop 3 yrs ago. Will try to update more frequently and be a bit more interactive on eG...but here's a start!

autism.jpg

chocbars.jpg

dorothy.jpg

peppermint-bark-tcs.jpg

stpat.jpg

mallows.jpg

shoes.jpg

red.jpg

peel.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Beautiful stuff Erika! Hope you can join us at the workshop.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I tip my hat to the shoes. So much easier than the other way 'round!


Little surprises 'round every corner, but nothing dangerous

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sounds delicious! And their texture looks quite beautiful.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

minas6907, lovely caramels and Turkish Delights. For the Turkish Delights, whose recipe did you use and what kind of starch did you use?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey thanks, both of you! The recipe I used is from chocolates and confections 2nd edition, using the native starch. I do add to it, though, corn syrup in the amount of half of whatever the sugar is. I say that because I usually make 1/3 of the full recipe, so its 8oz corn syrup. I've seen that if its made without it, as the recipe says, the candies crystallize rather quickly and lose the supple texture they should have.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey thanks, both of you! The recipe I used is from chocolates and confections 2nd edition, using the native starch. I do add to it, though, corn syrup in the amount of half of whatever the sugar is. I say that because I usually make 1/3 of the full recipe, so its 8oz corn syrup. I've seen that if its made without it, as the recipe says, the candies crystallize rather quickly and lose the supple texture they should have.

Thank you for the information; I'll make a note of that in my book.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Espresso caramels for an upcoming wedding.

Those caramels look fabulous!! If you don’t mind my asking how did you get the espresso infused into the caramel recipe? I’ve tried a couple different recipes, and they turned out okay but yours look so much better.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Espresso caramels for an upcoming wedding.

Those caramels look fabulous!! If you don’t mind my asking how did you get the espresso infused into the caramel recipe? I’ve tried a couple different recipes, and they turned out okay but yours look so much better.

It wasn't anything complicated, just ground the espresso and steeped it in the cream and evaporated milk the day before, then strain and proceed with the caramel recipe!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mina,

I usually only steep the espresso in the cream for about 30 minutes, so I will try doing it the day before and see if I can produce better espresso caramels. Thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Heres some peppermint meltaways I made today. Weather was cool, so took advantage of it for some chocolate work.

Meltaways.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Heres a few things I just did for an event. Gold dusted caramels, espresso caramels, and sea salt caramels, along with blackberry and peach pate de fruit.

Gold Dusted Caramels.jpg

Caramel Plating.jpg

Pate de Fruit Plating.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Heres a few things I just did for an event. Gold dusted caramels, espresso caramels, and sea salt caramels, along with blackberry and peach pate de fruit.

Minas,

As is always the case, your items are beautiful. You have a real gift. I am interested in the peach pate de fruit. What did you use for the peach flavor? I spent some time recently trying to get adequate peach flavor in a ganache for molded chocolates. I used frozen peaches to make a purée, and they had no flavor at all (in spite of beautiful yellow color). Canned peaches had better flavor, but (even when I reduced the purée by boiling) were overwhelmed by the addition of chocolate (white). I added some peach powder, but I eventually threw the powder out--its flavor (whatever tiny amount there was) was bland. Finally I used peach compound, but found it had an off-taste, nowhere close to peaches (aside from raspberry and strawberry, I have not been thrilled with compounds). So I am intrigued by how you got your flavor.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The peach flavor is just from the pureed peaches. Making the jellies is a bit different then a ganache, where you have chocolate as a base then you flavor that mixture. The pate de fruit is completely fruit based and gelled with pectin, so I didn't have chocolate as a factor in my items that would affect the taste. I guess what I'm trying to say, is a peach jellie is of course going to have a strong peach flavor, where as a peach ganache it isn't going to be as pronounced, the items aren't really comparable, they are different in many ways.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Heres a few things from the last few days. First, a piped ginger marshmallow, and second is a blackberry lavender truffle.

Piped Marshmallow.jpg

Black-Lav Truffles.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Today I made my first transfer sheet for chocolates, and it turned out much better than I had anticipated. I used some colored cocoa butters (from Chef Rubber) that I had lying around. I didn't make an explicit attempt to temper them (there is a difference of opinion on this subject, I have learned), but I did stir the mostly melted cocoa butter with some unmelted until it thickened somewhat. So for the bottom layer (which would become the top) I used a small whisk to splatter some of the rose-colored cocoa butter (being more careful this time not to splatter the walls of my kitchen as well!). I let that dry, then finger-painted the blue in sort of crescent shapes. I sprinkled half of the transfer with gold glitter to see how that would turn out. I was alarmed that the cocoa butter was in rather thick blobs in some places--unlike professional transfers--but that did not seem to matter in the unmolding process later. I cut the sheet to the size of the mold and made shells with some milk chocolate. To my great surprise, the shells turned out rather well. The gold glitter barely showed up; I am guessing it melted when I poured in the milk chocolate--so far I have had no luck with using glitter.

For those who have been thinking of making their own transfer sheets, I highly recommend giving this process a try. It is a lot of fun. I can't become a convert to this method since I recently bought a large supply of PCB sheets from Qzina and have to use those first.

transfer-sheet.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.

  • Similar Content

    • By Jim D.
      Host's note: this topic was split from Pâte de Fruits (Fruit Paste/Fruit Jellies) (Part 2)
       
       
      I took a look. Rather manipulative site: you have no idea what your selection will cost until you have finished choosing chocolates. And the descriptions are a masterpiece of marketing:  dulce de leche is "succulent homemade milk jam"--a rather grand description of cooked sweetened condensed milk. Really! But you are so right, they look amazing.
    • By jedovaty
      Good morning!
       
      Long story short: I am doing a spin off the coconut/chocolate/almond candy (almond joy), and trying to create a specific shape out of the almond.  My hands are cramped after a couple dozen failed attempts whittling roasted almonds, so now I'd like to try a different approach, and instead, create some kind of sub-candy or cookie with roasted almonds that I can put into a mold or use a mini cookie cutter.  I'm fairly new to sweets, my knowledge in this area is pretty slim.  Some ideas so far, I don't like any, but it might help turn some gears:
      1. dusting almond over a stencil, but that's not enough almond nor crunchy enough
      2. almond brittle, but that's too hard and sweet, I'd like it more of a soft crunch, and bringing the almond flavor forward
      3. meringue with almonds (sort of macaron-ish), however, weather has been humid and raining here, and I'm ending up with a gooey mess instead of that soft crunch
       
      In addition to having almond-forward taste and soft crunch texture, it'd be fun to explore something modernish - I have a accumulated a few tools and ingredients not customarily found in homes.
       
      There are dietary considerations I will have to account for, however, no need to worry about that now, I am just looking for ideas and a place to take it from there
       
      Thank you for your time in reading!
    • By ChristysConfections
      Hey there wise E-gullet-ers!
       
      I have another question to put out there. I am interested in making a rose jelly - one that I can layer with a chocolate ganache similar to a pâte de fruit. I don't really know how to go about this. Do you infuse water with dried rose petals and make a syrup? What's the best way to gellify it? I'm very curious. Has anyone made jellies with any other botanicals? Is anyone willing to share their recipe as a guideline?
       
      Many thanks!
      Christy
    • By JesseK
      Hello,
       
      hoping someone can help me with some workflow questions. I've recently taken over the pastry role in a small tasting menu restaurant and we'd like to produce molded chocolate truffles for either mignardise or take-aways. We have 5 poly trays of molds that hold 40/tray and we'd like to produce roughly that many per week (200). Time and space is tight so I'd like to do this in one go, once per week. The problem I'm having is I don't know the proper workflow for creating this many candies at once. We do not have a tempering machine so it would be stovetop tempering. Is it possible to do that in one go with one big bowl of chocolate? In the past I've made truffles, but always discarded the chocolate after filling the molds. Is it a bad idea to put chocolate from the molds back into the large batch of tempered chocolate? (i.e. fill the molds with chocolate, let the shell set (1-2 mins) then when tipping the chocolate out, can that be tipped back into the large batch?) Also, any tips for large batch tempering of chocolate? We don't have a marble slab so the seeded method is really the only one. The real question is how can I keep a large batch of chocolate tempered for the time it takes to produce 200 molded candies? We have minimal equipment for this kind of operation and I'd be tempering over a double boiler then using ambient heat from a frenchtop to maintain temperature. 
       
      Is this too much to do without a tempering machine? I'm worried about maintaining the temperature of the tempered chocolate during the time it takes to fill 200 molds with filling. I know I can retemper if I lose it but I really need to work fast and efficiently to get this done in the timeframe that I have (~1hr). If anyone has some insight into a workflow it would be much appreciated. 
       
      Thanks,
       
      Jesse
    • By curls
      Looking for your opinions and experiences... I am planning to put some wire shelving in my chocolate & confections kitchen. The kitchen has a concrete floor. This shelving will hold ingredients, colored cocoa butters, and packaging. Wondering if I should get casters for this shelving... what are your thoughts on this oh so important question?  ;-)
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.