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Chris Hennes

Your Daily Sweets: What are you making and baking? (2012–2014)

572 posts in this topic

Thank you for reminding me of her! :) I want to try making branches for Easter. Some people use freezing-cold alcohol as she uses the ice water, maybe I'll try both to see which gives better results.

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Pumpkin pie (for people that don't like pumpkin pie).

I'm sure the traditional is a great dessert with lots of history, but it's stodgy and heavy and will always remain in pecan pie's shade.

Here's mine: pâte sucrée, a butternut squash crémeux and spiced golden syrup meringue. It's nice to grate some spices onto the meringue before torching it, it amplifies the aroma. I used tonka, cinnamon and nutmeg.

I just saw this and it looks amazing. Any chance I could get a recipe, please? :)

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For Burns night, a slightly updated Cranachan.

Cranachan.jpg

From top to bottom:

Oatmeal tuiles

Whisky mini babas

Honey glaze

Honey vanilla Chantilly

Raspberry crémeux

Whisky-soaked genoise

Flapjack

Oatmeal milk chocolate crunch.

Cranachan cut.jpg

Goes down nicely with a dram :)

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Pumpkin pie (for people that don't like pumpkin pie).

I'm sure the traditional is a great dessert with lots of history, but it's stodgy and heavy and will always remain in pecan pie's shade.

Here's mine: pâte sucrée, a butternut squash crémeux and spiced golden syrup meringue. It's nice to grate some spices onto the meringue before torching it, it amplifies the aroma. I used tonka, cinnamon and nutmeg.

I just saw this and it looks amazing. Any chance I could get a recipe, please? :)

Thanks, I'll put it up on recipegullet when I get the chance.

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For Burns night, a slightly updated Cranachan...

Yikes ! I want some.

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QUIET!  People are trying to pontificate.

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For Burns night, a slightly updated Cranachan.

attachicon.gifCranachan.jpg

From top to bottom:

Oatmeal tuiles

Whisky mini babas

Honey glaze

Honey vanilla Chantilly

Raspberry crémeux

Whisky-soaked genoise

Flapjack

Oatmeal milk chocolate crunch.

attachicon.gifCranachan cut.jpg

Goes down nicely with a dram :)

You are extremely talented. I saw your pumpkin pie recipe, WOW!

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For Burns night, a slightly updated Cranachan.

attachicon.gifCranachan.jpg

From top to bottom:

Oatmeal tuiles

Whisky mini babas

Honey glaze

Honey vanilla Chantilly

Raspberry crémeux

Whisky-soaked genoise

Flapjack

Oatmeal milk chocolate crunch.

attachicon.gifCranachan cut.jpg

Goes down nicely with a dram :)

You are extremely talented. I saw your pumpkin pie recipe, WOW!

Thanks, you're very kind. I love doing the more elaborate entremets and preparations. Especially when serving specialties like haggis to non-British diners, you really need something memorable for dessert :)

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Jmacnaughtan, what's the "flapjack" layer? I've only ever heard the word in its American context, as a pancake, and that sure don't look like a doughy pancake to me!


"Commit random acts of senseless kindness"

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I love doing the more elaborate entremets and preparations. Especially when serving specialties like haggis to non-British diners, you really need something memorable for dessert :)


Did you not once make a V8 entremet with 8 different layers featuring vanilla? Either way, this one looks fantastic as well. Can you recommend a good book focusing on entremets? I noticed you sometimes reference Philippe Conticini's Sensations.

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Jmacnaughtan, what's the "flapjack" layer? I've only ever heard the word in its American context, as a pancake, and that sure don't look like a doughy pancake to me!

Interesting, I thought this sort of flapjack was an American invention. It's just a very simple oat cookie made from rolled oats, golden syrup, butter and muscovado sugar. This is the first time I've used it as anything other than a petit four, though. Here's a recipe that's not too far off the one I used.

I love doing the more elaborate entremets and preparations. Especially when serving specialties like haggis to non-British diners, you really need something memorable for dessert :)

Did you not once make a V8 entremet with 8 different layers featuring vanilla? Either way, this one looks fantastic as well. Can you recommend a good book focusing on entremets? I noticed you sometimes reference Philippe Conticini's Sensations.

Haha, yes, that was a challenge. I saw that on Masterchef Australia and had to try it... For books with good entremet techniques and recipes, I like Francisco Migoya's "the Modern Café" and "Elements of Dessert" (although I find several of his recipes flawed, the technique is good), and Conticini's "Sensations" is a wonderful book. So many great techniques, flavors and preparations. I think it's only available in French, though. There are a couple of good entremets in Adriano Zumbo's "Zumbo", including the V8, but I'm not convinced it's worth shelling out 30€ for.

I find that entremets are technically easier than many "home-cooking" layer cakes. If you have a couple of metal cake rings, a freezer and a few basic recipes to adapt, it's feasible to make a professional looking cake at home. I know I'll never have the technical skill to pull off a perfect buttercream-coated cake, my spatula skills are just too weak.

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Jmacnaughtan, what's the "flapjack" layer? I've only ever heard the word in its American context, as a pancake, and that sure don't look like a doughy pancake to me!

Interesting, I thought this sort of flapjack was an American invention. It's just a very simple oat cookie made from rolled oats, golden syrup, butter and muscovado sugar. This is the first time I've used it as anything other than a petit four, though. Here's a recipe that's not too far off the one I used.

I'm with judiu – the only thing I've ever heard "flapjack" used to describe is a pancake (I'm Canadian, but I've heard Americans refer to them as such). That recipe sounds good tho!

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I'm gonna go bake something…

wanna come with?

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If you say "flapjack" in the UK - maybe in commonwealth countries - you mean the same sweet caramelly oat bars that jmacnaughton's talking about. They're pretty good - you can bake to anywhere between crunchy like Nature's Valley bars, to soft and chewy.

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QUIET!  People are trying to pontificate.

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Chocolate Espresso Torte !

Looks great- what's the veil you've put over it? Is it white chocolate?

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jmacnaughtan,

Its a White Chocolate Plastic the I spray it with a chocolate cocoa butter mix. Thank you !

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I had to use up a couple of cans of coconut milk and solid pack pumpkin which are necessary for making buchi buchi -- Guam's version of fried pumpkin turnover. I ran out of filling so I opted to use whatever I had on hand -- cream cheese with jam, and ricotta cheese with ham-egg-and-cheddar. I don't know how the cream cheese and ricotta will hold up in the fryer, but I guess I'll see whenever I cook them -- maybe today. The fried pumpkin turnover picture is from a previous batch:

Guam buchi buchi

IMG_8498.jpg

1623749_10202298363012266_756975794_n.jp

Miscellaneous pies -- jam and cream cheese

1545052_10202298363052267_992561565_n.jp

Ricotta with ham, cheddar cheese, and eggs

1690184_10202298362972265_543711461_n.jp


Edited by pquinene (log)
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Ruth – I love the sharp edges on your Christmas cookies (post #391). Do you share the recipe?

Patrick – your desserts are gorgeous! How in the world did you pipe that chocolate cream pie?

Lovely work, y’all!

BBC mini eclairs/cream puffs for a friend’s tea:

Vanilla bean custard and a 10x glaze.

med_gallery_3331_172_145813.jpg

Inside:

med_gallery_3331_172_138012.jpg

These were absolutely delicious, but the eclairs were just too small to fill with custard, so I’ll make only cream puffs from now on.

Jessica’s family birthday celebration – Happy 30th!!! She requested cheesecake:

med_gallery_3331_172_112158.jpg

Served with caramel apple and blueberry lemon toppings.

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Kim,

Thank you, I use a st honore tip.. Every pie is similar but different, I pipe 2 lines of whipped cream then 2 or 3 of chocolate whipped cream.

Patrick

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Kim, I read a hint in a church cookbook just today, if you dip your cookie cutter in warm oil, it will cut sharper lines!


"Commit random acts of senseless kindness"

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Mmm, eclairs! Haven't had one in ages, but I would love one now. Or ten. :)

Passion fruit curd and vanilla bean swiss meringue-filled macs.

image.jpg

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image.jpg

Carrot cake. Half will go to my daughter and family and the other half to my son's home. Since nobody cares for icing it is easy-peasy.

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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