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ElsieD

Pressure cooker cookbooks

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I have finally ordered a pressure cooker and would like to get some recommendations for a couple of recipe books. Does anyone have any suggestions for which ones to get? Thanks!

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I've tried a number of recipes from a number of places and the ones I like the most came from the Modernist Cuisine at Home cookbook.

They really show the versatility of this piece of equipment.

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Yes, I have Modernist Cuisine at Home but I am hoping to get another cookbook for pressure cookers.

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Elsie,

I have several. Lorna Sass' books are excellent, everyone seems to like them.

I also like the 'Miss Vickie PC Cookbook' a lot because it is so extensive.

I think my actual favorite is The New Pressure Cooker Cookbook by Pat Daily, I've found I use this one the most for actual recipes.

The others I use more for technique.

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The original Modernist Cuisine books have even more than the at Home version.

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Yes I've got the pressure cooker bug too recently. Excellent for blasting pigs cheeks in half an hour, making congee in even less. Don't know how I lived without it. Really want to try octopus in it soon.

Actually the original Modernist Cuisine set doesn't have much on pressure cookers. It recommends them for making stocks, but while it admits they have their uses cooking tough meats the preferred method is sous vide, hence much more on that. There is a table in there of recommended pressure cooker times for meats but I can never find it as the PC stuff is poorly index. The Modernist Cuisine @Home book seems to use pressure cookers much more, presumably because its a more accessible piece of kit.

re: books here are two recent ones I've had my eye on:

The Pressure Cooker Cookbook by Catherine Phipps

80 Recipes for your Pressure Cooker by Richard Ehrlich

Happy blasting!

J


More Cookbooks than Sense - my new Cookbook blog!

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I have a number of pressure cooker cookbooks, the one you mention is pretty good but the one that I've found most useful is this one:

New Pressure Cooker Cookbook

Lorna Sass books are good as is the Cooks Illustrated one.

 

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I've read several but I prefer the pressure cooker book by @pazzaglia

 

The cooking times in the CI book seem strange.

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