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Diastatic Malt Powder in Australia


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Hi everyone,

I've just been watching the latest Modernist Cuisine video for potato puree (I think this recipe is in MC@H as well). They suggest using diastatic malt powder since it acts as an enzyme that can break down the potato starch into a smooth puree.

Does anyone know of anywhere one can purchase diastatic malt powder in Australia (preferably Melbourne)?

From the recipe (linked above) it suggests that it can be purchased at baking and brewing supply stores, but I've tried a few and none of them seem to sell it - they only sell varieties of non-diastatic malt powder. The closest I've found is this company, but they sell it pre-mixed with flour for baking purposes so I don't think this would work very well! I've tried my usual places (MFCD, The Red Spoon Company, Chef's Armoury) but they don't have it listed - at least not as 'diastatic malt powder'.

Thanks in advance,

John

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I sent an email to a friend of mine who works in the starch industry. He said that his company does not stock it. He suggested you try a beer brewing supplier. Apparently they use diastatic malt to help yeast ferment malt as well.

(edit) It only costs $9.32 to buy from Amazon.

Edited by Keith_W (log)
There is no love more sincere than the love of food - George Bernard Shaw
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I sent an email to a friend of mine who works in the starch industry. He said that his company does not stock it. He suggested you try a beer brewing supplier. Apparently they use diastatic malt to help yeast ferment malt as well.

(edit) It only costs $9.32 to buy from Amazon.

Just checked and they won't ship that product to Australia, sadly. I have the same problem as the OP. The search continues.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hi all,

Thanks very much for your help! I got in touch with Basic Ingredients, and even though they don't list it on their website they were able to sell me 200g for $5.50 + postage to Melbourne of $3.00. So that was pretty easy - it took a few days for them to get back to me but once they did, they sent it almost immediately and I received it yesterday.

Keith_W - thanks for your offer about splitting the bag, that was going to be my next choice if I couldn't get a small quantity!

John

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The mixing bowl - 2 locations in Melbourne (search on Google go to ingredients price list on their site, I live near by. So I picked it up, I'm guessing they would courier though).

I bought 200g for about $3. Made the visychoisse it was very nice. Though I'd have to do a blind test to see how much better than normal.

Btw creme brulee texture using rice cooker with PID as a bain marie from MCAH was wonderful & easy.

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  • 1 year later...
Guest John MacLeod

Basic Ingredient now charge a minimum of $15 domestic postage!!! Even for small items like their diastatic malt. I asked if they had any better options but they didn't. I'll report back if I find a more economic source.

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