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solera


rhumbustion
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anyone know of any rums produced using the solera method? That's when they stack barrels on top of each other, oldest one on the bottom, bottling from the bottom only, filling the top with new rum. Produces consistency. This is used to produce sherry, I believe, and I've heard certain rums. Anyone?

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anyone know of any rums produced using the solera method?  That's when they stack barrels on top of each other, oldest one on the  bottom, bottling from the bottom only, filling the top with new rum.  Produces consistency.  This is used to produce sherry, I believe, and I've heard certain rums.  Anyone?

The technique was established in the mid 1800's in Spain to make Brandy De Jerez (Sherry brandy), which I'm writing an a article on for eGullet's home page.

Jason Perlow

Co-Founder, The Society for Culinary Arts & Letters

offthebroiler.com - Food Blog | View my food photos on Instagram

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This may be but I honestly doubt it, since this is only a small part of Bacardi's product line and they don't mention Solera blending in their marketing material for this rum. But I could be wrong.

Edward Hamilton

Ministry of Rum.com

The Complete Guide to Rum

When I dream up a better job, I'll take it.

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Santa Teresa 1796 Solera

"Traveler, you who sail into the Caribbean in silvered yacht or gilded cruise ship, pause as you enter these waters to remember that deep below rest three men of honor who helped determine the history of this onetime Spanish Lake: Sir John Hawkins, builder of the English navy; Sir Francis Drake, conqueror of all known seas; Admiral Ledesma, stubborn enhancer of his king's prerogatives and the interests of his own strong family"

James A. Michener - Caribbean

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I just saw this process described in commandant Perlow's article on Spanish brandies. It sounds similar to the method for producing balsamic vinegars. Is it similar, in design, purpose and/or effect? Is this system used for anything else? Do other cultures use it?

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