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I'm looking for Pierogi ideas. So far, I've only had them very basically, with sour cream, bacon, parsley etc, but what are other ways to serve them? I saw an America's Test Kitchen recipe for pierogis on a bed of mushrooms with (I think) a white wine-sour cream sauce, which sounded great.

Are there any soups/stews with them?

Any good meaty ideas?

For the record - I haven't tried making them myself yet, and generally put off making things with homemade dough, but I'm open to ideas for fillings too! (Might give Michael Symon's beef cheek pierogis to start.)

Cheers!

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My favourite is potato @cheese filled fried with onions and bacon . There are also sweet pierogi , which I have eaten but never made myself. Most of which are filled with some sort of fruit and traditionally still served with sour cream .


"Why is the rum always gone?"

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In my family they've always been filled with a mixture of potatoes, dry curd cottage cheese, sauerkraut and sautéed onions. Much more flavour in my opinion than the standard potato/cheese versions. We don't fry them unless they're leftovers to be served for breakfast the next morning, and they're always served with my grandfathers famous heart attack sauce: Fry bacon, mushrooms and onion. Add cream and reduce until you have a thick sauce. It's not something you want to eat every day, but it's at the top of my comfort food list.

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Funny, I just wrote a post on my blog about varenyky, which are the Ukrainian equivalent of pierogi. I basically make them with potato puree, pumpkin, or "cabbage" (Brussels sprouts and bok choy). I like serving them in various stews and braised dishes. For example, the potato pierogi go very well in a goulash.

venisongoulash1-small.jpg?w=614

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In my family, Pierogi are filled with mashed potato, sauteed red onions, parsely, and bacon; they're served with sour cream. My oma also makes a version that she calls Pedehe, which are stuffed with cumin-spiced fried ground beef and onions of some sort. Both are delicious.


Elizabeth Campbell, baking 10,000 feet up at 1° South latitude.

My eG Food Blog (2011)My eG Foodblog (2012)

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Check out this old topic for lots of ideas: pierogi recipes

Yes, I saw that thread but it seemed to be more ideas for fillings.

This is more what I'm looking for:

Funny, I just wrote a post on my blog about varenyky, which are the Ukrainian equivalent of pierogi. I basically make them with potato puree, pumpkin, or "cabbage" (Brussels sprouts and bok choy). I like serving them in various stews and braised dishes. For example, the potato pierogi go very well in a goulash.

venisongoulash1-small.jpg?w=614

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My oma also makes a version that she calls Pedehe, which are stuffed with cumin-spiced fried ground beef and onions of some sort.

Disregarding my last post, those do sound delicious!

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The Krakus Market grocery store in the heavily Polish neighborhood of Port Richmond here in Philadelphia usually has potato, cheese, potato & cheese, sauerkraut, mushroom, potato & onion, meat, potato/cheddar/jalapeno, apple. blueberry and cherry. They are all delicious. I love pierogi! They are so versatile. I like the savory ones with just butter and/or sour cream and sweet fruit ones with sour cream. They're all good. I've also had the frozen veal or lamb vareniki or pelmeni from the Russian market with butter, sauteed onions and a splash of vinegar. Those are good too. If there's a good Russian or Eastern European grocery near you see if you can find the frozen vareniki/pelmeni. They would work the same as pre-made tortellini in a soup I'm certain.


Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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Pierogi Ruski (potato cheese) are my favorite. After they're boiled, I like to fry them with a little bacon and onion. My husband's favorite is a creamed spinach, and speaking of spinach, one restaurant here in Poznan serves a meat pierogi (just boiled), with a drizzle of beef gravy over a mound of creamed spinach. You could certainly throw them in soup.


Edited by Food is my Love Language (log)

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