Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Making pie dough in walk-in freezer/outside in winter?


Recommended Posts

I live in HOT Tucson, and also do a lot of pie baking in the hot, humid summers of New England. No reason to have tough pastry, in any weather. I don't refrigerate my flour--I use it too fast--but you could. Your fat should be cold (but not frozen) and you should use ice water. And chill your pastry (freezer or fridge) before rolling. But other than that, it sounds like you are over-working. I use my fingers, working rapidly. Try that, or a fork.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I've generally found that the shortening becoming warm tends to make the dough greasy; I agree with Jane, if your dough is tough, it's probably being overworked.

Even in mid-winter, in the unheated kitchen in our last flat (effectively a walk-in refrigerator, according to the thermometer), my hands seemed to warm up enough to soften the shortening (and I hate using metal tools, because the sound/vibration of them moving against the bowl makes me cringe), so I'd cut the butter into slices, then thin strips, then tiny cubes (tossing the butter in a little rice flour between each set of cuts, to keep the bits from sticking together), then chill (not freeze, since that's like trying to work together flour and pebbles) the butter while I was getting the rest of the ingredients gathered and set to go. The tiny cubes of butter work in very quickly, so the dought is light rather than grasy and heavy.

In terms of avoiding tough dough, what worked for me was switching to a recipe that replaced part of the water with vodka (gluten doesn't develop well in the presence of alcohol). Swapping in a bit of rice flour for the wheat or spelt I usually use also gives good results.

Michaela, aka "Mjx"
Manager, eG Forums
mscioscia@egstaff.org

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the suggestions. One more question: what can I do with overworked pie dough? I'll try the new techniques, but there are a few mounds in the fridge that I know are overworked.

Roll out, maybe season it, and make crackers?

I second Mjx's idea. Grate lots of cheese on top, that will help with the taste, because plain pie dough tastes very bland.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...