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bethesdabakers

Paris: Bread & Tagines

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Off to Paris next weekend for the first time in a couple of years. Apart from having a good time, celebrating aniversaries, etc. my chief interests are bread and food related.

I know the main kitchen shops and Librairie Gourmande, and I've done the famous boulangeries but does anyone have any suggestions or personal favourites or new arrivals in these fields?

Plus, this time we're not flying, so can stagger back on Eurostar with a decent tagine in addition to the Martinique rum. Where's the best place reasonably near the centre to find North African cookware?

Thanks

Mick

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Actually, the area around Gare du Nord is rather ethnic, so you may not have to venture too far (though most apparent is Tamiltown, literally in the shadow of the station. Seek out a restaurant called Ganesha Corner....). If in doubt, head away from the centre of town from the station and you will definitely be in North African territory soon.

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Thanks, I should have thought of that but normally would be heading into the centre from Gare du Nord, probably directly onto the metro without leaving the station.

Mick

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Well, the story did end up north of Gare du Nord - in Liverpool. See here

Had a great weekend in Paris but it rained as bad as North Wales. We walked for miles but among the ethnic shops we never came across anything North African. But thanks again for the suggestions - we made plent of new discoveries.

Mick

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